Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) or search for Louisiana (Louisiana, United States) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cable, George Washington 1844- (search)
factory, and for a time a reporter on the New Orleans Picayune. In 1879 he gave himself up wholly to literature, making a specialty of describing Creole life in Louisiana. In 1887 he established the House-Culture Clubs, a system of small clubs The Faraday laying the Atlantic cable. for the purpose of promoting more cordial relaThe Faraday laying the Atlantic cable. for the purpose of promoting more cordial relations among the different classes of society. His writings include Old Creole days; The Grandissimes; Madame Delphine; The silent South; The Creoles of Louisiana; The negro question; Strange true stories of Louisiana; John March, Southerner, etc.The Faraday laying the Atlantic cable. for the purpose of promoting more cordial relations among the different classes of society. His writings include Old Creole days; The Grandissimes; Madame Delphine; The silent South; The Creoles of Louisiana; The negro question; Strange true stories of Louisiana; John March, Southerner, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Canals. (search)
,500,00018479Savannah River, Ga., to Augusta, Ga. Black River3,581,954184935Rome, N. Y., to Lyons Falls, N. Y. Cayuga and Seneca 2,232,632183925Montezuma, N. Y., to Cayuga and Seneca Lakes, N. Y. Champlain 4,044,000182281Whitehall, N. Y., to Waterford. N. Y. Chesapeake and Delaware3,730,230182914Chesapeake City, Md., to Delaware City, Del. Chesapeake and Ohio11,290,3271850184Cumberland, Md., to Washington, D. C. Chicago Drainage. See next page. Companys 90,000184722Mississippi River, La., to Bayou Black, La. Delaware and Raritan 4,888,749183866New Brunswick, N. J., to Trenton, N. J. Delaware Division2,433,350183060Easton, Pa., to Bristol, Pa. Des Moines Rapids4,582,00918777 1-2At Des Moines Rapids, Mississippi River. Dismal Swamp2,800,000182222Connects Chesapeake Bay with Albemarle Sound. Erie 52,540,8001825381Albany, N. Y., to Buffalo, N. Y. Fairfield 4 1-2Alligator River to Lake Mattimuskeet, N. C. Galveston and Brazos340,000185138Galveston, Tex., to Brazos River, Te
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Census, United States (search)
44334,821,550 Indiana5,641..21211813107666882,516,462 Indian Territory.............................39392,060 Iowa43,112..........292720111010102,231,853 Kansas107,206..............33292019221,470,495 Kentucky73,6771497666898811122,147,174 Louisiana76,556....181719191817212225231,381,625 Maine96,540111414121213162223273030694,466 Maryland319,7286781011151719202327261,188,044 Massachusetts378,7874557886777672,805,346 Michigan4,762....252727232016139992,420,982 Minnesota6,077...........9,99064,011 Idaho161,77284,38577,387 Illinois4,821,5503,826,351995,199 Indiana2,516,4622,192,404324,058 Indian Territory391,960180,182211,778 Iowa2,231,8531,911,896319,957 Kansas1,470,4951,427,09643,399 Kentucky2,147,1741,858,635288,539 Louisiana1,381,6251,118,587263,038 Maine694,466661,08633,380 Maryland1,190,0501,042,390147,660 Massachusetts2,805,3462,238,943566,403 Michigan2,420,9822,093,889327,093 Minnesota1,751,3941,301,826449,568 Mississippi1,551,2701,289,600261,670 Missour
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cherokee Indians, (search)
good — will of the Spaniards and Indians in Florida. He also held a conference with the chiefs of thirty-seven different cantons of Cherokees. He gave them presents, smoked with them the pipe of peace, marked the boundaries of the lands between them and the English settlers, regulated weights and measures, and appointed an agent to superintend their affairs. He then concluded a treaty of commerce and peace with the Creeks. About 1730 the projects of the French for uniting Canada and Louisiana by a cordon of posts through the Ohio and Mississippi valleys began to be developed. To counteract this scheme, the British wished to convert the Indians on the frontiers into allies or subjects, and, to this end, to make with them treaties of union and alliance. The British government accordingly sent out Sir Alexander Cumming to conclude such a treaty with the Cherokees. It was estimated that they could then put 6,000 warriors in the field. In April, 1730, Sir Alexander met the chie
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chickasaw Indians, (search)
said they came from west of the Mississippi, under the guardianship of a great dog, with a pole for a guide. At night they stuck the pole in the ground, and went the way it leaned every morning. Their dog was drowned in crossing the Mississippi, and after a while their pole, in the interior of Alabama, remained upright, and there they settled. De Soto passed a winter among them (1540-41), when they numbered 10,000 warriors. These were reduced to 450 when the French seated themselves in Louisiana. Wars with the new-comers and surrounding tribes occurred until the middle of the eighteenth century. They favored the English in the Revolution, when they had about 1,000 warriors. They joined the white people against the Creeks in 1795, and always remained the friends of the pale faces; and, in 1818, they had ceded all their lands north of the State of Mississippi. Some of the tribe had already emigrated to Arkansas. In 1834 they ceded all their lands to the United States, amoun
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chinese-American reciprocity. (search)
is imperative for the farmers and manufacturers of the United States to seek an outlet for their products and goods in foreign markets. But whither shall they turn? At first sight, Europe presents perhaps the most inviting field. Both blood and association point in this direction. But here the cottons of Lowell would have to compete with the fabrics of Manchester. The silk manufacturers of Paterson would stand small chance of supplanting the finished products of Lyons. The sugar of Louisiana would encounter a formidable rival in the beet-sugar of Germany. England could probably better afford to sell her coal and iron cheaper than Pennsylvania, and Russia could supply European markets with wheat and petroleum as well as could Ohio and Indiana. Competition would be keen and destructive. Central and South America have as yet too sparse a population for the immense territory they cover to meet the conditions of a market for American goods. Some decades must elapse before A
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Choctaw Indians, (search)
Choctaw Indians, A tribe mostly Mobilians, and a peaceful agricultural people. Their domain comprised southern Mississippi and western Alabama. De Soto fought them in 1540. They became allies of the French in Louisiana, where they numbered about 2,500 warriors, and formed forty villages. In the Revolution they were mostly with the English, but were granted peaceable possession of their lands by the United States government. On Jan. 3, 1786, a treaty was made with the leaders of the nation, of the same purport and upon the same terms as that made with the Cherokees the previous year. As early as 1800, numbers of them went beyond the Mississippi, and in 1803 it was estimated that 500 families had emigrated. They served with the United States troops in the second war with England and in that with the Creeks, and in 1820 they ceded a part of their lands for a domain in what is now the Indian Territory. In 1830 they ceded the rest of their lands and joined their brethren w
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cipher despatches. (search)
Cipher despatches. The result of the Presidential election of 1876 in the United States depended upon the electoral votes of Louisiana, South Carolina, and Florida, long in dispute. Mr. Hayes needed all three States, while any one of them would have elected Mr. Tilden. Pending the result, many despatches in cipher passed between Mr. Tilden's friends and persons in the South, which, when translated and published in the New York Tribune, 1877, suggested attempted bribery. A great scandal arose, and Mr. Tilden publicly disclaimed all knowledge of the despatches.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil service, United States colonial. (search)
n they be forced to sacrifice it without tyrannical oppression. Those who think differently should study the case of French Canada, or, even better, the case of Louisiana. It would have been natural to expect, in 1803, that the inflowing tide of American immigration would soon absorb or overwhelm the scattered little settlements of French creoles, numbering in all, masters and slaves, within the bounds of the present State of Louisiana, not more than 30,000. On the contrary, French life and manners still survive, the civil law has never been displaced by the English common law, and after nearly a century, over one-sixth of the native whites of the State ggers, will be even less qualified for the task. A repetition in the West Indies of the mistake of Jefferson, who committed the French and Spanish population of Louisiana to the government of Claiborne and Wilkinson, men grossly ignorant of their language, customs, institutions, and history, will make our rule less tolerable than
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
n of South Carolina.—10. The legislature of Louisiana voted $500,000 to arm the State. —22. The CFeb. 5. John Slidell and J. P. Benjamin, of Louisiana, withdrew from the United States Senate, the The Emancipation Proclamation published in Louisiana.—7. Mutiny of the 100th Illinois Regiment. wners.—22. Michael Hahn elected governor of Louisiana by the loyal vote. Moseby defeats Union cave Russy blown up by the National forces.—28. Louisiana State Constitutional Convention met at New Oakes command of the Department of the South. Louisiana State Constitutional Convention adopts a claquantity of cotton, provisions, and stores. Louisiana State Convention adopted a constitution abolan.—26. The Confederate governor (Allen) of Louisiana wrote to the Confederate Secretary of War th—26. This day was observed as a festival in Louisiana, by proclamation of Governor Hahn, in honor intendent Conway, in charge of free labor in Louisiana, reported that, during the year 1864, 14,000[1
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