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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 584 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 298 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 112 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 76 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 72 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 62 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 62 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 52 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 50 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 46 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Maine (Maine, United States) or search for Maine (Maine, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 292 results in 145 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abenakes, or Abnakis (search)
Abenakes, or Abnakis ( Men of the Eastern land ), a group of Algonquian (q. v.) tribes of Indians, originally occupying the territory now included within the State of Maine. They included the Penobscot, Norridgewock, and Arosguntacook families, and in the disturbances of the day adhered to the French, whose missionaries converted most of them to Christianity.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abolition. (search)
doption of the Constitution, in 1787, which included the compromise resolution that provided for the continuation of the slave-trade, by permission, until 1808, caused very little change in the sentiment of the people, and all hoped that in some way, not yet imagined, the gradual and peaceful abolition of slavery would be accomplished. In 1777, Vermont, not yet admitted to the Union, formed a State constitution abolishing slavery. Like constitutions were adopted by Massachusetts, including Maine, in 1780, and by New Hampshire in 1783. Gradual abolition was secured by statute in Pennsylvania in 1780, in Rhode Island and Connecticut in 1784, in New York in 1799, and in New Jersey in 1804. Abolition of slavery in the Northwest Territory, north of the Ohio and east of the Mississippi, including the present States of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and part of Minnesota, was secured by the Ordinance of 1787. In 1807, Congress passed an act for the abolition of the slave-
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Acquisition of Territory. (search)
hode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. The boundaries of many of these States, as constituted by their charters, extended to the Pacific Ocean; but in practice they ceased at the Mississippi. Beyond that river the territory belonged, by discovery and settlement, to the-King of Spain. All the territory west of the present boundaries of the States was ceded by them to the United States in the order named: Virginia, 1784: Massachusetts, 1785; Connecticut, 1786 and 1800; South Carolina, 1787; North Carolina, 1790: Georgia, 1802. This ceded territory comprised part of Minnesota, all of Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio (see Northwest Territory), Tennessee, and a great part of Alabama and Mississippi. Vermont was admitted as a separate State in 1791; Kentucky, then a part of Virginia, in 1792; and Maine, till that time claimed by Massachusetts, in 1820.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alabama. (search)
eek before the Secession Ordinance was adopted, volunteer troops, in accordance with an arrangement made with the governors of Louisiana and Georgia, and by order of the governor of Alabama, had seized the arsenal at Mount Vernon, about 30 miles above Mobile, and Fort Morgan, at the entrance to Mobile Harbor, about 30 miles below the city. The Mount Vernon arsenal was captured by four Confederate companies commanded by Captain Leadbetter, of the United States Engineer Corps, and a native of Maine. At dawn (Jan. 4, 1861) they surprised Captain Reno, who was in command of the arsenal, and the Alabama Confederates thus obtained 15,000 stands of arms. 150, 000 pounds of gunpowder, some cannon, and a large quantity of munitions of war. The Alabama Senators and Representatives withdrew from Congress Jan. 21, 1861. On March 13, a State convention ratified the constitution adopted by the Confederate Congress. The authorities of the State seized the national property within its borders
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alexander, Barton Stone, 1819-1878 (search)
Alexander, Barton Stone, 1819-1878 Military engineer: born in Kentucky in 1819; was graduated at the Military Academy at West Point in 1842. He was made second lieutenant of engineers in 1843, and captain in 1856. For services at the battle of Bull Run. July, 186;1, he was brevetted major, and in March, 1863, was commissioned major of the engineer corps. For meritorious services during the Civil War, he was brevetted brigadier-general in March, 1865. Active during the war, he was consulting engineer in Sheridan's army in the Shenandoah Valley, and was at the Battle of Cedar Creek, Oct. 19, 1864. After the war he spent two years in charge of the construction of public works in Maine. He died in San Francisco, Cal., Dec. 15, 1878.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), America, discoverers of. (search)
sland and the main near, and in honor of the unmarried Queen the whole country was named Virginia. In 1602 Bartholomew Gosnold, sailing from England directly across the Atlantic, discovered the continent on May 14, near Nahant, Mass., and sailing southward also discovered a long, sandy point, which he named Cape Cod, because of the great number of that fish found there. He also discovered Nantucket, Martha's Vineyard, and the Elizabeth Islands. In 1604 Martin Pring discovered the coast of Maine. Again the French had turned their attention to North America. M. de Chastes, governor of Dieppe, having received a charter from the King, of France to form a settlement in New France, he employed Samuel Champlain, an eminent navigator, to explore that region. He sailed from Honfleur in March, 1603, went up the St. Lawrence in May to Quebec, and, returning to France, found De Chastes dead, and the concession granted to him transferred by the King to Pierre du Gast, Sieur de Monts, a weal
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Archdale, John, 1659- (search)
proprietors. In their scheme he had been a great helper. His eldest sister, Mary, had married Ferdinando Gorges, grandson of Sir Ferdinando, who was governor of Maine, and in 1659 published America painted from life. Archdale had been in Maine as Gorges's agent in 1664, was in North Carolina in 1686, and was commissioner for GoMaine as Gorges's agent in 1664, was in North Carolina in 1686, and was commissioner for Gorges in Maine in 1687-88. On his arrival in South Carolina as governor, in 1694, Archdale formed a commission of sensible and moderate men, to whom he said, at their first meeting, I believe I may appeal to your serious and rational observations whether I have not already so allayed your heats as that the distinguishing titles theMaine in 1687-88. On his arrival in South Carolina as governor, in 1694, Archdale formed a commission of sensible and moderate men, to whom he said, at their first meeting, I believe I may appeal to your serious and rational observations whether I have not already so allayed your heats as that the distinguishing titles thereof are so much withered away; and I hope this meeting with you will wholly extinguish them, so that a solid settlement of this hopeful colony may ensue; and by so doing, your posterity will bless God for so happy a conjunction. He told them why he had been sent, and said, And now you have heard of the proprietors' intentions of
of New Jersey), James Winchester (of Tennessee), John P. Boyd (of Massachusetts), and William Hull (then governor of the Territory of Michigan) were commissioned (April 8, 1812) brigadier-generals. The same commission was given (June) to Thomas Flournoy, of Georgia. John Armstrong, of New York, was also commissioned (July 4) a brigadier-general to fill a vacancy caused by the recent death of Gen. Peter Gansevoort. This was soon followed (July 8) by a like commission for John Chandler, of Maine. Morgan Lewis, of New York, was appointed quartermaster-general ´╝łApril 3), and Alexander Smyth, of Virginia, was made inspector-general (March 30)--each bearing the commission of a brigadier-general. Thomas Cushing, of Massachusetts, was appointed adjutant-general with the rank of brigadier-general. James Wilkinson, of Maryland, the senior brigadier-general in the army, was sent to New Orleans to relieve Wade Hampton (then a brigadier-general), who was a meritorious subaltern officer in S
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Aroostook disturbance. (search)
Aroostook disturbance. In 1837-39 the unsettled boundary between Maine and New Brunswick nearly led to active hostilities on the Aroostook River. Maine sent armed men to erect fortifications, and Congress authorized the President to resist the encroachments of the British. General Scott arranged a truce and joint occupation. The boundaries were finally adjusted by treaty, Aug. 9, 1842. See Ashburton, Lord; Maine; Webster, Daniel. Aroostook disturbance. In 1837-39 the unsettled boundary between Maine and New Brunswick nearly led to active hostilities on the Aroostook River. Maine sent armed men to erect fortifications, and Congress authorized the President to resist the encroachments of the British. General Scott arranged a truce and joint occupation. The boundaries were finally adjusted by treaty, Aug. 9, 1842. See Ashburton, Lord; Maine; Webster, Daniel.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bancroft, George, (search)
ion Abraham Lincoln has fallen a martyr. His death, which was meant to sever it beyond repair, binds it more closely and more firmly than ever. The blow aimed at him was aimed, not at the native of Kentucky, not at the citizen of Illinois, but at the man who, as President, in the executive branch of the government, stood as the representative of every man in the United States. The object of the crime was the life of the whole people, and it wounds the affections of the whole people. From Maine to the southwest boundary of the Pacific, it makes us one. The country may have needed an imperishable grief to touch its inmost feeling. The grave that receives the remains of Lincoln receives the costly sacrifice to the Union; the monument which will rise over his body will bear witness to the Union; his enduring memory will assist during countless ages to bind the States together, and to incite to the love of our one undivided, indivisible country. Peace to the ashes of our departed fr
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