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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 584 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 298 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 112 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 76 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 72 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 62 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 62 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 52 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 50 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 46 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition.. You can also browse the collection for Maine (Maine, United States) or search for Maine (Maine, United States) in all documents.

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George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition., Preface to the first edition (search)
uainted with the sources of our early history. I have dwelt at considerable length on this first period, because it contains the germ of our institutions. The maturity of the nation is but a continuation of its youth. The spirit of the colonies demanded freedom from the beginning. It was in this period, that Virginia first asserted the doctrine of popular sovereignty; that the people of Maryland constituted their own government; that New Plymouth, Connecticut, New Haven, New Hampshire, Maine, rested their legislation on the popular will; that Massachusetts declared itself a perfect commonwealth. In the progress of the work, I have been most liberally aided by the directors of our chief public libraries; especially the library at Cambridge, on American history the richest in the world, has been opened to me as freely as if it had been my own. The arrangement of the materials has been not the least difficult part of my labor. A few topics have been anticipated; a few, reser
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition., Preface to the first edition (search)
uainted with the sources of our early history. I have dwelt at considerable length on this first period, because it contains the germ of our institutions. The maturity of the nation is but a continuation of its youth. The spirit of the colonies demanded freedom from the beginning. It was in this period, that Virginia first asserted the doctrine of popular sovereignty; that the people of Maryland constituted their own government; that New Plymouth, Connecticut, New Haven, New Hampshire, Maine, rested their legislation on the popular will; that Massachusetts declared itself a perfect commonwealth. In the progress of the work, I have been most liberally aided by the directors of our chief public libraries; especially the library at Cambridge, on American history the richest in the world, has been opened to me as freely as if it had been my own. The arrangement of the materials has been not the least difficult part of my labor. A few topics have been anticipated; a few, reser
lowed. under the auspices of De Guercheville and Mary of 1613 Medici; the rude intrenchments of St. Sauveur were Chap. I.} 1613. raised by De Saussaye on the eastern shore of Mount 1613. Desert Isle. The conversion of the heathen was the motive to the settlement; the natives venerated Biart as a messenger from heaven; and under the summer sky, round a cross in the centre of the hamlet, matins and vespers were regularly chanted. France and the Roman religion had appropriated the soil of Maine. Meantime the remonstrances of French merchants had effected the revocation of the monopoly of De Monts, and a company of merchants of Dieppe and St. 1608. Malo had founded Quebec. The design was executed 1608. July 3. by Champlain, who aimed not at the profits of trade, but at the glory of founding a state. The city of Quebec was begun; that is to say, rude cottages were framed, a few fields were cleared, and one or two gardens planted. The next year, that singularly bold 1609. adv
2. May 14. far to the north of Nahant. Belknap's Biog II. 103. Williamson's Maine, i. 184, 185. He failed to observe a good harbor, and, standing for the south, l. It reached the American coast among the islands which skirt the harbors of Maine. The mouth Chap. III.} of the Penobscot offered good anchorage and fishing Pr danger. Purchas, IV. 1654—1656. Compare Belknap, II. 123—133; Williamson's Maine, i. p. 185—187. Pring, a few years later, 1606. repeated his voyage, and made a more accurate survey of Maine. Enterprises for discovery were now continuous. Bartholomew Gilbert, Purchas, IV. 1656—1658. returning from the West Indies, mican continent near Cape Cod. Turning to the north, he approached the coast of Maine, and ascended the western branch of the Penobscot beyond Belfast Bay; where theBrief Narration, c. II. Compare Belknap's Am. Biog. II. 134—150; Williamson's Maine, i. 191—195. Strange with what reckless confidence Oldmixon, i. 219, 220,
ony seemed firmly established; and its gov- 1613. ernor asserted for the English the sole right of colonizing the coast to the latitude of forty-five degrees. In 1613, sailing in an armed vessel, as a protector to the fishermen off the coast of Maine, Samuel Argall, a young sea-captain, of coarse passions and arbitrary temper, discovered that the French were just planting a colony near the Penobscot, on Mount Desert Isle; and, hastening to the spot, after cannonading the intrenchments, and a north; raised the arms of England where those of De Guercheville had been planted; threw down the fortifications of De Monts on the Isle of St. Croix; and set on fire the deserted settlement of Port Royal. Thus did England vindicate her claim to Maine and Acadia by petty acts of violence, worthy only of ma- Chap. IV.} 1613. rauders and pirates. In less than a century and a half, the strife for acres which neither nation could cultivate, kindled war round the globe. Meantime the people of
Purchas, IV. 1828. Smith, II. 173—175. Belknap, i. 350—354. i. Mass. Hist. Coll. i. 251, 252. Williamson's History of Maine, i. 197—203. Prince, 116, 117, 118, 119. Hubbard's N. E. 36, 37. After a tedious voyage, the adventurers reached the coocean at the same time with the little squadron of the French, who succeeded in building Quebec, the very summer in which Maine was deserted. The fisheries and the fur-trade were not relinquished; vessels were annually employed in traffic with thdo Gorges, and of friends in London, members of the Plymouth company, to establish a colony. Sixteen men Williamson's Maine, i. 212 The learned and very valuable historian of Maine confounds this design of Smith to found a colony with his previoMaine confounds this design of Smith to found a colony with his previous voyage for trade and discovery. were all whom the adventurers destined for the occupation of New England. The attempt was unsuccessful. Smith was forced by extreme tempests to return. Again renewing his enterprise, he suffered from the treache<
bard, 614-16. Prince, 215. Adams's Annals of Portsmouth, 9, 10. Williamson's Maine, i. 222, and ff. Belknap's New Hampshire, c.;—a truly valuable work, highly cree transformed into regular establishments of trade. For the early history of Maine, the original authorities are in Purchas vol. IV.; the Relation of the PresideNorth America, his first act with reference to the territory of the present state of Maine was, to invite the Scottish nation to become the guardians of its frontierility of the French minister, very different causes delayed the colonization of Maine. Hardly had the little settlement, which claimed the distinction of being the Except for the wealth to be derived from the forest and the sea, the coast of Maine would not at that time have been tenanted by Englishmen; and this again was fatifty inhabitants, when the first court ever duly organized on the soil of 1636 Maine was held within its limits. Documents in Folsom, 49—52. Josselyn, 200. Befo
he whole heaven. When we are gone, our posterity and children after us shall read, in our town-records, your loving-kindness to us, and our real endeavor after peace and righteousness. Far different were the early destinies of the Province of Maine. A general court was held at Saco, 1640 June 25. under the auspices of the Lord Proprietary, who had drawn upon paper a stately scheme of government, with deputies and counsellors, a marshal and a treasurer of the public revenue, chancellors, aitants of the towns of York, Kittery, Wells, Saco, and 1656 Cape Porpoise, yet not a majority, remonstrated on the ground of former experience. To sever them from Massachusetts would be to them the subverting of all civil order. Documents in Maine Hist Coll. 296. 299. Ms. Letter of Geo. Folsom. Thus did Massachusetts, following the most favorable interpretation of its charter, extend its frontier to the islands in Casco Bay. It was equally successful in maintaining its independence o