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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
control of the armies under General Halleck, and the Federal flotilla sailed unmolested from St. Louis to Vicksburg. The Federal right was thrown forward into Mississippi. Its center occupied north Alabama, and its left was pressing the Confederates to the southern border of east Tennessee. The Confederate problem was to deviion of Cumberland Gap, June 18th, by a Federal division, and the approach of Buell's forces toward Chattanooga seriously threatened his department. Map of North Mississippi and West Tennessee. Map of the Corinth and Iuka region. General Bragg recognized the inadequacy of General Smith's force, and on June 27th he transfragg and Kirby Smith met at Chattanooga, and a joint movement into middle Tennessee was determined upon, Price and Van Dorn being left to confront Grant in northern Mississippi. On August 5th Bragg sent two of his brigades (Cleburne's and Preston Smith's) to General Smith at Knoxville. General C. L. Stevenson, with nearly nine t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
reased activity of small parties, were a part of these measures. It was at first in contemplation to move the Tupelo army upon my rear in middle Tennessee, but the wiser plan was adopted of concentrating in my front. One division of that army, and reeforcements from other quarters, reached Chattanooga in June. General Bragg arrived on the 30th of July, and by that time the transfer of his force from Tupelo was about completed. The nucleus of a force under Van Dorn and Price was left in Mississippi to neutralize the large Federal force on the Memphis and Charleston road, an object which was accomplished at first by inaction alone, and at last by bold though unsuccessful attacks with inferior numbers. The foreshadowing of an aggressive campaign from east Tennessee soon began to be seen. By report, and actually, as the record now shows, the objective was at first middle Tennessee and Nashville. Rumor, as usual, placed the force that was ready for the work at very large numbers--8
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The battle of Fredericksburg. (search)
ws's divisions; on Telegraph Hill, Pickett's division; to the right and about Deep Run Creek, Hood's division, the latter stretching across Deep Run Bottom. On the hill occupied by Jackson's corps were the divisions of A. P. Hill, Early, and Taliaferro, that of D. H. Hill being in reserve on the extreme right. To the Washington Artillery, on Marye's Hill, was assigned the service of advising the army at the earliest possible moment of the Federal advance. General Barksdale, with his Mississippi brigade, was on picket duty in front of Fredericksburg on the night of the advance. The hills occupied by the Confederate forces, although over-crowned by the heights of Stafford, were so distant as to be outside the range of effective fire by the Federal guns, and, with the lower receding grounds between them, formed a defensive series that may be likened to natural bastions. Taylor's Hill, on our left, was unassailable; Marye's Hill was more advanced toward the town, was of a gradua
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.63 (search)
of more than thrice as many Union troops from the Trans-Mississippi to the Tennessee to meet them there. This policy of depon was sent to Beauregard, to whose Department the Trans-Mississippi still belonged, to beg him to appoint Major-General Hindlity and force, was assigned to the command of the Trans-Mississippi, which was now, for the first time, made a separate depauently ordered to Texas; Price was directed to remain in Mississippi; See With Price east of the Mississippi, Vol. II., philus H. Holmes was assigned to the command of the Trans-Mississippi. General Holmes reached Vicksburg on the 30th of Julwas then too busy organizing a sort of independent Trans-Mississippi Confederacy to have time for anything else. All that Pr649; and General Kirby Smith's entire force in the Trans-Mississippi amounted to 41,887, of whom 32,971 were present for dutydent to relieve General Holmes from service in the Trans-Mississippi, and toward the middle of March this was done. Genera
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Chickasaw bluffs (or First Vicksburg), Miss.: December 27th, 1862--January 3d, 1863. (search)
The opposing forces at Chickasaw bluffs (or First Vicksburg), Miss.: December 27th, 1862--January 3d, 1863. The composition, losses, and strength of each army as here stated give the gist of all the data obtainable in the Official Records. K stands for killed; w for wounded; m w for mortally wounded; m for captured or missing; c for captured. The Union army. Right wing. Thirteenth army Corps. Major-General William T. Sherman. First division, Brig.-Gen. Andrew J. Smith (also in command of the Second Division December 29th). Escort: C, 4th Ind. Cav., Capt. Joseph P. Lesslie. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Stephen G. Burbridge: 16th Ind., Col. Thomas J. Lucas; 60th Ind., Col. Richard Owen; 67th Ind., Col. Frank Emerson; 83d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. William H. Baldwin; 96th Ohio, Col. Joseph W. Vance; 23d Wis., Col. Joshua J. Guppey. Brigade loss: k, 1; w, 1==2. Second Brigade, Col. William J. Landram: 77th Ill., Col. David P. Grier; 97th Ill., Col. Friend S. Rutherford; 108th Ill.,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.67 (search)
o the South the possession of Tennessee and Mississippi was employed in a wild expedition into Kent, p. 30.] General Grant was then in northern Mississippi, with an army formed by uniting the detuld be assigned to service in Tennessee and Mississippi in a few days. Thinking myself authorized ted the transfer of the army in Arkansas to Mississippi. The suggestion was not adopted or noticed could not give adequate aid to the army in Mississippi without exposing himself to inevitable defeops with Lieutenant-General Pemberton's, in Mississippi, which would have formed an effective force almost a fourth of General Bragg's army to Mississippi, while of no present value to that departme by telegraph, orders to proceed at once to Mississippi and take chief command of the forces there,been sick five or six weeks when ordered to Mississippi, and therefore he had no right to suppose td the invading army, and not only preserved Mississippi but enabled us to recover Tennessee. But[16 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The defense of Vicksburg. (search)
rtillery, and Ogden's Louisiana battalion of artillery. After these came Mellon's regiment and Balfour's battalion of Mississippi troops. The staff-officers were Major Devereux, Assistant Adjutant-General; Major Girault, Inspector-General; Lieuten headquarters at Jackson. About the same time General Grant was placed in supreme command of the Federal forces in north Mississippi. Then followed a succession of movements against Vicksburg, having for their object the turning of that point. Thmbardment by the fleet. From photographs. was playing havoc with railroads and depots of supplies in the interior of Mississippi; rumors of movements of Federal troops in north Mississippi were rife; and Port Hudson in Louisiana was threatened. Gnorth Mississippi were rife; and Port Hudson in Louisiana was threatened. General Pemberton, just previous to this time, had sent some troops from his department to General Bragg, at Tullahoma, and had others en route to the same destination. As soon as he became convinced that Vicksburg was seriously threatened by Genera
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.69 (search)
orps could be got out of the way. The country in this part of Mississippi stands on edge, as it were, the roads running along the ridges e Colonel Benjamin H. Grierson, who was making a raid through central Mississippi [from La Grange, Tennessee, to Baton Rouge, Louisiana]. He hand immediately assumed command of all the Confederate troops in Mississippi. I knew he was expecting reenforcements from the south and eastng on, hoisted the National flag over the Confederate capital of Mississippi. Stevenson's brigade was sent to cut off the Confederate retreay as 7:30. Their Map of battlefield of Big Black River bridge Mississippi showing the positions of U. S. Troops, May 17th 1863. positions authorized to assume control of any military forces from the Upper Mississippi which may come within your command. . . You will exercise supattacked by about three thousand men from Richard Taylor's Trans-Mississippi command. With the aid of the gunboats these were speedily repel
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Confederate forces: Lieut.-General John C. Pemberton. (search)
Port Gibson, k, 12; w, 48; m, 27 = 87. Vaughn's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. J. C. Vaughn: 60th Tenn., Capt. J. W. Bachman; 61st Tenn., Lieut.-Col. James G. Rose; 62d Tenn., Col. John A. Rowan. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Francis A. Shoup: 26th La., Col. Winchester Hall (w), Lieut.-Col. William C. Crow; 27th La., Col. L. D. Marks (m w), Lieut.-Col. L. L. McLaurin (k), Capt. Joseph T. Hatch; 28th La., Col. Allen Thomas; Ark. Battery (McNally's). Brigade loss: Vicksburg (siege), k, 107; w, 199 = 306. Mississippi State Troops (under Vaughn's command), Brig.-Gen. John V. Harris: 5th Reg't, Col. H. C. Robinson; 3d Battalion, Lieut.-Col. Thomas A. Burgin. Attached Troops: 14th Miss. Art'y Battalion, Maj. M. S. Ward; Miss. Partisan Rangers, Capt. J. S. Smyth. Bowen's division, Maj.-Gen. John S. Bowen. First (Missouri) Brigade, Col. Francis M. Cockrell: 1st and 4th Mo., Col. A. C. Riley; 2d Mo., Lieut.-Col. P. S. Senteny (k), Maj. Thomas M. Carter; 3d Mo., Lieut.-Col. F. L. Hubbell (m w), Col. W.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Naval operations in the Vicksburg campaign. (search)
held by the enemy, from Vicksburg to Port Hudson, included the outlet of the Red River, by which provisions and stores from Louisiana and Texas, arms and ammunition from the Rio Grande, and detachments of men, were forwarded through the trans-Mississippi country. On the 2d of February Porter sent the Queen of the West, under Colonel Charles R. Ellet, to the Red River. Her passage of the Vicksburg batteries alone and by daylight — for her start had been delayed for necessary repairs — was mad meantime repaired the Queen, fitted out an expedition composed of their prize, together with the Webb and two cotton-clad steamers. These followed the Indianola and overtook her a short distance below Warrenton. Engaging The Union vessels Mississippi and Winona at Baton Rouge. her at night, which gave them peculiar advantages, they succeeded in ramming her seven times, disabling her steering gear, and opening at last one great hole in her side. The Union vessel, reduced to a sinking cond
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