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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) or search for Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) in all documents.

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vainly planned To leave their country great and free? Their sleeping ashes, from below, Send up the thrilling murmur, No! Knit they the gentle ties which long These sister States were proud to wear, And forged the kindly links so strong, For idle hands in sport to tear-- For scornful hands aside to throw? No! by our fathers' memory, No! Our humming marts, our iron ways, Our wind-tossed woods on mountain crest, The hoarse Atlantic, with his bays, The call, broad Ocean of the West, And Mississippi's torrent-flow, And loud Niagara, answer, No! Not yet the hour is nigh, when they Who deep in Eld's dim twilight sit, Earth's ancient kings, shall rise and say, “Proud country, welcome to the pit! So soon art thou, like us, brought low?” No! sullen group of shadows, No! For now, behold, the arm that gave The victory in our fathers' day, Strong, as of old, to guard and save-- That mighty arm which none can stay-- On clouds above, and fields below, Writes, in men's sight, the answer, No
ery strong position, quite as strong naturally as by art. It is a heath, somewhat like the steppes of Russia, bounded by hills, swamps, small streams, and hedged by dense woods. From Bull Run towards Manassas, the facilities for defence grow more formidable. The whole position is almost impregnable. The whole number of troops in Virginia does not exceed 70,000. Only some 4,000 or 5,000 of these are at Richmond. Reinforcements reach there to the extent of several hundred daily. Two Mississippi regiments have arrived within the last ten days, made up of Southern gentlemen, disciplined, and splendid in equipment. Immediately about the city there are no important intrenchments. With a few guns in position there, and the masked batteries on all sides, the people feel secure. There are several strong batteries at Acquia Creek, and the force there is rapidly increasing. Both at Manassas and Richmond the talk was that a strong force will be concentrated at some point or points o
of the end — Supplies running short.--The Memphis Appeal of the 18th instant considers the situation of the rebels in the following serious language;--We desire to call the attention of planters to the importance of an early subscription in flour and corn-meal for the use of our army. The Confederate Government purchased in May last an immense quantity of flour, and stored it at this place, but the supply is now nearly exhausted. Unless the planters of West Tennessee, North Alabama, and Mississippi, come forward and subscribe flour and meal, taking Confederate bonds in payment, our brave boys in the field will soon be without bread. Let each planter indicate to the Commissary Department at this place, by mail or through his commission merchant, what quantity he is willing to sell to the Government for their bonds, and let them send it forward immediately. There are five mills in operation here capable of grinding----bushels daily, to which the planters can send their wheat and hav
Fugitive slaves.--From the census returns of 1850 and 1860, it appears that the number of slaves that have escaped from each of the Southern States during the last twenty years is as follows:--  From 1840 to ‘50.From 1850 to ‘60. Alabama2936 Arkansas2128 Delaware2612 Florida1811 Georgia8923 Kentucky96119 Louisiana9046 Maryland279115 Mississippi4168 Missouri6099 North Carolina6461 South Carolina1623 Tennessee7029 Texas2916 Virginia83117   Total1,011803 Whole number in twenty years1,814 A little girl, recognizing the uniform of a Massachusetts soldier, at Baltimore, on Sunday, ran up to him, slipped a rose into his hand, and was out of sight before he had a chance to thank her.--N. Y. Sun, June 7. in Vicksburg, Mississippi, the ladies are opposed to the Home guard business, and can't see any bravery in the young men who prefer home duty to service in the field. The following is a copy of one of their bulletins: to arms! To arms!--There will be <
67. they call me a traitor now. The following lines were suggested by seeing an old man intently gazing at the American flag, as it floated from the dome of one of the hotels in Memphis, Tenn. I live, said he, in Mississippi, where they won't let that flag be raised, but I love that flag; I bore it through the Indian wars, and at New Orleans, under Gen. Jackson. I am sixty-nine years of age. I was born and raised in this State. My father, an old Revolutionary soldier, was one of the first settlers. My country has been very good to me, and gave me all I love. My country I love. I love Tennessee; I am sorry I ever left her. I want to live where that flag waves. I don't like the people of Mississippi; they call me a traitor now! I have borne that flag in former years To conquer a savage foe, Whose ravaging deeds on our then frontier, Brought terror, and death, and woe; And how we suffered 'mid toil and pain, 'Tis history will tell you how, Yet those whose peace those wars
Regiments from Mississippi.--A correspondent of the Louisville Courier, writing from Memphis, June 26, says:--Mississippi has now nineteen regiments in the Confederate army, and has twelve more organized and drilling, ready to obey the first summons to march. The Adams Troop from Natchez, the most splendidly equipped body of cavalry ever seen in this country, passed on to Virginia by the way of our city a few days ago. It is a corps formed among the gentlemen of Natchez and Adams counties, aMississippi has now nineteen regiments in the Confederate army, and has twelve more organized and drilling, ready to obey the first summons to march. The Adams Troop from Natchez, the most splendidly equipped body of cavalry ever seen in this country, passed on to Virginia by the way of our city a few days ago. It is a corps formed among the gentlemen of Natchez and Adams counties, and drilled by General Quitman when he was in the prime of his military ardor. It was kept up in its full efficiency till the present revolution, when it resolved to take part in the conflict, and since then it has been under the instruction of an experienced French cavalry officer. There was not an ordinary horse in the troop of one hundred, and their splendid chargers seemed as thoroughly drilled as the men. The outfit of each member cost over $1,000, and there was not a private in the ranks