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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 836 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 690 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 532 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 480 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 406 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 350 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 332 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 322 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 310 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 294 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Missouri (Missouri, United States) or search for Missouri (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 418 results in 179 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, John Quincy, 1767- (search)
oundary between Louisiana and Mexico was established. He is credited with having been the author of the declaration known as the Monroe doctrine (see Monroe, James). The closing part of his term as Secretary was marked by the legislation of the Missouri compromise (Missouri). When President Monroe submitted to his cabinet the two questions concerning the interpretation of the act as passed by the Congress, Mr. Adams stood alone in the opinion that the word forever meant forever. When MonroeMissouri). When President Monroe submitted to his cabinet the two questions concerning the interpretation of the act as passed by the Congress, Mr. Adams stood alone in the opinion that the word forever meant forever. When Monroe's administration was drawing to a close, several prominent men were spoken of as candidates for the Presidency — William C. Crawford, John Quincy Adams, Henry Clay, John C. Calhoun, and Andrew Jackson. The votes in the autumn of 1824 showed that the people had not elected either of the candidates; and when the votes of the Electoral College were counted, it was found that the choice of President devolved upon the House of Representatives. In February, 1825, that body chose John Quincy Adams P
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), American protective Association, (search)
The year 1893, however, showed such remarkable success for the order in the political field that the conditions changed and the ambitions politician suddenly awoke to the realization that baptism in A. P. A. water was attended with pleasant and profitable political consequences. In the two years that followed the order planted itself firmly in every State and Territory in the Union, and was instrumental in overturning the entire political machinery in New York, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, and Iowa, and of California, Minnesota, Pennsylvania. Wisconsin, Washington, and Oregon, in part. With these victories commenced a general policy of active aggression, and the negative tactics of the organization were practically abandoned. The opening of the Fifty-fourth Congress demonstrated the power of the organization in the political field as no event had previously done. Nearly one hundred members of the House of Representatives were elected to office p
ia, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana, and District of Porto Rico, embracing Porto Rico and adjacent islands; headquarters, Governor's Island, N. Y. Commander, Maj.-Gen. John R. Brooke. Department of the Lakes.--States of Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee; headquarters, Chicago, Ill. Commander, Maj.-Gen. Elwell S. Otis. Department of the Missouri.--States of Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas, and Arkansas, the Indian Territory, and the Territory of Oklahoma; headquarters, Omaha, Neb. Commander, Brig.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee. Department of Texas.--State of Texas; headquarters, San Antonio. Tex. Commander, Col. Chambers McKibbin, 12th Infantry. An act of Congress of June 6, 1900, re-organized the regular army and re-established the grade of lieutenant-general by the following provision: That the senior major-general of the line commanding the army shall have the rank, pa
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Asboth, Alexander Sandor, 1811- (search)
Asboth, Alexander Sandor, 1811- Military officer; born in Hungary, Dec. 18, 1811. He had served in the Austrian army, and at the outbreak of the revolution of 1848 he entered the insurgent army of Hungary, struggling for Hungarian independence. He accompanied Kossuth in exile in Turkey. In the autumn of 1851 he came to the United States in the frigate Mississippi, and became a citizen. When the Civil War broke out in 1861 he offered his services to the government, and in July he went as chief of Fremont's staff to Missouri, where he was soon promoted to brigadier-general. He performed faithful services until wounded in the face and one arm, in Florida. in a battle on Sept. 27, 1864. For his services there he was brevetted a major-general in the spring of 1865. and in August following he resigned, and was appointed minister to the Argentine Republic. The wound in his face caused his death in Buenos Ayres, Jan. 21, 1868.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bailey, Joseph, 1827- (search)
y, Joseph, 1827- Military officer; born in Salem, O., April 28, 1827; entered the Union army as a private in 1861; acquired great fame by his skill in damming the Red River at Alexandria (May, 1864), by which the squadron of iron-clad gunboats, under Admiral Porter, was enabled to pass down the rapids there when the water was low. He had been a lumberman in Wisconsin, and in that business had learned the practical part which he used in his engineering at Alexandria, where he was acting chief-engineer of the 19th Army Corps. Other engineers said his proposition to .dam the river was absurd, but in eleven days the boats, by his method, passed safely down. For this achievement he was promoted to colonel, brevetted brigadier-general, voted the thanks of Congress, and presented with a sword and $3,000 by the officers of the fleet. He settled in Missouri after the war, where he was a formidable enemy of the bushwhackers, and was shot by them in Nevada, in that State, on March 21, 1867.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bancroft, George, (search)
als, and he recovered them for the United States, to whom they belonged; that the capital, which he found the abode of slaves, is now the home only of the free; that the boundless public domain which was grasped at, and, in a great measure, held, for the diffusion of slavery, is now irrevocably devoted to freedom; that then men talked a jargon of a balance of power in a republic between slave States and free States, and now the foolish words are blown away forever by the breath of Maryland, Missouri, and Tennessee; that a terrible cloud of political heresy rose from the abyss, threatening to hide the light of the sun, and under its darkness a rebellion was growing into indefinable proportions; now the atmosphere is purer than ever before, and the insurrection is vanishing away; the country is cast into another mould, and the gigantic system of wrong, which has been the work of more than two centuries, is dashed down, we hope, forever. And as to himself personally, he was then scoffed
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bates, Edward, 1793- (search)
Bates, Edward, 1793- Statesman; born in Belmont, Va., Sept. 4, 1793; served in the Virginia militia in 1813; removed to Missouri in 1814; and began practising law in 1816. He was a prominent anti-slavery man, and during the National Republican Convention of 1860( he received 48 votes on the first ballot for President. Mr. Lincoln after his election appointed Mr. Bates Attorney-General. He resigned in 1864, and returned to his home in St. Louis, where he died. March 25, 1869.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Benton, Thomas Hart, -1858 (search)
y weapons both parties gave and received severe wounds. He was colonel of a Tennessee regiment from December, 1812, to April, 1813, and lieutenant-colonel in the regular army from 1813 to 1815. Removing to St. Louis in 1813, he established the Missouri inquirer there, and practised his profession. He took an Thomas Hart Benton. active part in favoring the admission of Missouri as a State of the Union, and was one of its first representatives in the United States Senate, which post he held fMissouri as a State of the Union, and was one of its first representatives in the United States Senate, which post he held for thirty consecutive years, where he was ever the peculiar exponent and guardian of The West. He was an early and untiring advocate of a railway from the Mississippi to the Pacific Ocean. He warmly opposed the repeal of the Missouri compromise (q. v.) in 1854. His free-labor sentiments caused his defeat as a candidate for the Senate by the ultraslavery men of his party in 1850, and in 1852 he was elected to the House of Representatives. By a combination of his old opponents with the America
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bird's Point, (search)
Bird's Point, Opposite Cairo, was fortified early in 1861 by the National troops. It was on the west. side of the Mississippi River, a few feet higher than Cairo, so that a battery upon it would completely command that place. The Confederates were anxious to secure this point, and to that end General Pillow, who was collecting Confederate troops in western Tennessee. worked with great energy. When Governor Jackson, of Missouri. raised the standard of revolt at Jefferson City, with Sterling Price as military commander, General Lyon, in command of the department, moved more vigorously in the work already begun in the fortification of Bird's Point. His attention had been called to the importance of the spot by Captain Benham, of the engineers, who constructed the works. They were made so strong that they could defy any force the Confederates might bring against them. With these opposite points so fortified, the Nationals controlled a great portion of the navigation of the Mi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Black Hawk (search)
Black Hawk (Ma-ka-tae-mish-kia-kiak), a famous Indian: born in Kaskaskia, Ill., in 1767. He was a Pottawattomie by birth, but became a noted chief of the Saes and Foxes. He was accounted a brave when he was fifteen years of age, and soon afterwards led expeditions of war parties against the Osage Indians in Missouri and the Cherokees in Georgia. He became head chief of the Sacs when he was twenty-one years old (1788). Inflamed by Tecumseh and presents from the British agents, he joined the British in the War of 1812-15, with the commission of brigadier-general, leading about 500 warriors. He again reappeared in history in hostilities against the white people on the Northwestern frontier settlements in 1832. In that year eight of a party of Chippewas, on a visit to Fort Snelling, on the west banks of the upper Mississippi, were killed or wounded by a party of Sioux. Four of the latter were afterwards captured by the commander of the garrison at Fort Snelling and delivered up
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