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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 836 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 690 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 532 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 480 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 406 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 350 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 332 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 322 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 310 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 294 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 24, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Missouri (Missouri, United States) or search for Missouri (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

y repeated cheering. Joe finished the doings of the day by making everybody feel good humored — a fitting close as the drums beat tattoo. It is understood here that Major-General Earl Van-Dorn has been transferred for future service to Missouri. While his absence from this region will be much regretted by his legion of admirers, all are satisfied that his country will be much benefited by his services in Missouri. Van-Dorn is the idol of every Mississippi heart, and during his stay hking everybody feel good humored — a fitting close as the drums beat tattoo. It is understood here that Major-General Earl Van-Dorn has been transferred for future service to Missouri. While his absence from this region will be much regretted by his legion of admirers, all are satisfied that his country will be much benefited by his services in Missouri. Van-Dorn is the idol of every Mississippi heart, and during his stay here has "won golden opinions from all sorts of people." Warre
War matters.Federal reports of the battle in Kentucky.interesting from Missouri.&c. &c. &c. From the latest Northern and Southern papers which have been received we make up the following interesting summary of news. Although the news of our defeat in Kentucky lacks official confirmation, still the very reliable information one to a membership in the Federal Congress. That position he finally attained in 1853, and continued for three sucsuccessive terms to hold it. Affairs in Missouri--reported battle near Ironton — success of the Confederates. The St. Louis Democrat, of January 17, says: Information of a reliable character reached ta plain case, but that they will be sentenced to be shot. They may escape the death penalty through the intercession of Gen. Montgomery. U. S. Senator from Missouri. St. Louis, Jan. 20. --John B. Henderson has been appointed, by Lieut. Gov. Wall, U. S. Senator, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the expulsion of Trust
Daring Adventures in Missouri. --A correspondent of the Memphis Appeal, writing from New Madrid, 11th instant, records the doings of a few true patriots, and mentions Leedswell as deserving a place in the history of this war, which has yet to be written. He says: Three days ago a scouting party of five, all told, under a Lieutenant, while moving along the railroad line, between Charleston and Bird's Point, discovered the "Feds" in force. They had moved out that far in the cars, and were advancing South ward on their usual and nearly daily tour of stealing. Our men estimated them to number about 1,500, including 250 cavalry. Nothing daunted, this little band actually determined to ambuscade them a mile South of the road, at a favorable place, as they passed through a woods. Being all of them armed with shot guns, and shooting only buck shot, each fire sent nine shot into their thick ranks as they came marching past, hardly one failing to hit some one somewhere. The
l. Jones in Nashville we had the pleasure of many fireside talk with him upon affairs in the West, which he discusses with ready frankness, interspersed with many anecdotes and illustrations. These stories have led us to believe that, thus far, Missouri has the better of other seats of hostility for the real romance of war. Most assuredly the fight there has been waged with fiercer earnest than almost anywhere else. The remote geography of the country, the rough, unsewn character of the peoples progress a wild aspect, peculiarly susceptible to deeds, and suggestive of thoughts, of romantic interest. None of these struck us more forcibly than the story of Norah McCartey, the Jeanie Deans of the West. She lived in the interior of Missouri--a little, pretty, black-eyed girl, with a soul as huge as a mountain, and a form as frail as a fairy's and the courage and pluck of a buccaneer into the bargain. Her father was an old man — a Secessionist. She had but a single brother, just g