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George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 24 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 14 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 6 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 20, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 4 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 8, 1865., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 4 0 Browse Search
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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Master Henry Austell by Venice and thence to Ragusa over land, and so to Constantinople: and from thence by Moldavia , Polonia , Silesia and Germanie to Hamburg, &c. (search)
The voyage of Master Henry Austell by Venice and thence to Ragusa over land, and so to Constantinople: and from thence by Moldavia , Polonia , Silesia and Germanie to Hamburg, &c. THE 9. of June we tooke shipping at Harewich and the next day landed at the Ramekins in the Isle of Walcheren with very stormy weather, and that night went to Middleburch in the same Island. The twelft we tooke shipping for Holland , and the 13. we landed at Schiedam : and the same day went to Delft by boat, and so that night to the Hage . The 17. we tooke shipping at Amsterdam , and the 18. we landed at Enckhuysen. The 19. we tooke shipping and by the Zuydersee we passed that day the Ulie, and so into the maine sea; And the next day we entred into the river of Hamburg called the Elbe . The 21. we came to anker in the same river before a towne of the bishop of Breme called Staden , where they pay a certaine toll, and specially for wine, and so that night wee landed at Hamburg, where we
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Neustat. The 3. day to dinner at Bamberg : and before wee came (search)
wee came to a village hard by a Towne called Ilkusch, where the leade Mines are. The 10. wee passed by a Towne called Slawkow: where there are also leade Mines, and baited that day at Bendzin , which is the last towne of Poland towards Silesia ; and there is a toll. Note that all the Countreys of Poland, Russia alba, Podolia , Bogdania, and divers other Countreys adjoyning unto them, doe consume no other salt but such as is digged in Sorstyn mountaine neere to Cracovia which is as hard as any stone; it is very good, and goeth further then any other salt. That night we lay at Bitom, which is the first Towne of Silesia. The 12. we passed by a great towne called Strelitz, and that night we lay at Oppelen upon the river of Odera. The 13. we passed by Schurgasse, and that night wee lay without the towne of Brigk: for wee coulde not bee suffered to come in by reason of the plague which was in those partes in divers Townes. The 14. we passed by Olaw, and that night wee
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Advertisement (search)
y on the campaigns of 1796 and 1799, for developing their practical application. This work, which does as much honor to the illustrious prince as the battles which he has gained, put the complement to the basis of the strategic science, of which Lloyd and Bulow had first raised the veil, and of which I had indicated the first principles in 1805, in a chapter upon lines of operations, and in 1807, in a chapter upon the fundamental principles of the art of war, printed by itself at Glogau in Silesia. The fall of Napoleon, by giving up many studious officers to the leisures of peace, became the signal for the apparition of a host of military writings of all kinds. General Rogniat gave matter for controversy in wishing to bring back the system of the legions, or of the divisions of the republic, and in attacking the somewhat adventurous system of Napoleon. Germany was especially fertile in dogmatic works; Xilander in Bavaria, Theobald and Muller of Wurtemberg, Wagner, Decker, Hoyer
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 1: the policy of war. (search)
ish of the Spanish nation; nevertheless it was, one of the most contested by all Europe; it produced a general coalition against the legitimate legatee. Frederick II, profiting by a war of Austria against France, evokes old parchments, enters Silesia by main force, and seizes upon that rich province, which doubles the strength of the Prussian monarchy. The success and importance of this resolution made it a master stroke; for, if Frederick had not succeeded, it would have been unjust howeveined like a war against the Turks, or any Oriental nation, whose brave but undisciplined hordes, are susceptible of no order, no rational manoeuvre, or of any steadiness under reverses. Article III: wars of convenience. The invasion of Silesia by Frederick II, was a war of convenience; that of the Spanish succession equally so. There are two kinds of wars of convenience: those which a powerful state may undertake to give itself natural limits, to obtain an extremely important polit
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 2: military policy, or the philosophy of war. (search)
himself necessary for directing every thing according to his own will, the best system which he can adopt, will be to imitate precisely what the Prussian government did with Blucher; that is to say, to call to his assistance two generals the most famed for their capacity, the one taken from among men of acknowledged executive qualities, the other taken from among the best instructed chiefs of the staff. This trinity, if it agree well, can give excellent results, as had place in the army of Silesia in 1813. The same system would be suitable also in the case where the monarch should judge it proper to confide the command to a prince of his house, as has frequently been seen since the time of Louis XIV. The prince was often decorated only with the titular command, whilst a counselor was imposed upon him who commanded in reality. This was the case with the Duke of Orleans and Marsin, at the famous battle of Turin, then with the Duke of Burgundy and Vendome, at the battle of Oudenard.
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
or on a line of defense, the divisions of which should be at a certain distance asunder, count in this number; those which the armies of Napoleon had at Rivoli, Verona and Legnano, to watch the Adige, those which he had in 1813 in Saxony and in Silesia in advance of his line of defense, were strategical positions, as well as those of the Anglo-Prussian armies on the frontier of Belgium before the battle of Ligmy (1815), and that of Massena upon the Albis, along the Limmat and the Aar in 1799. three lines of operations conducting to the objective point, Leipzig: the first was that of the army of Bohemia, leading from the mountains of Erzgebirge by Dresden and Chemnitz upon Leipzig; the second was the line of operations of the army of Silesia, going from Breslau by Dresden or by Wittemberg upon Leipzig; finally, the third was the line of operations of the Prince of Sweden's army, departing from Berlin to go by Dessau to the same objective point. Each of those armies marched upon two
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 5: of different mixed operations, which participate at the same time of strategy and.of tactics. (search)
Those parallel retreats, if the defenders of Bulow must be believed, could be none other than those he has, it is said, recommended under the name excentric. For example, Marshal Soult, abandoning the Pyrenees in 1814, had to choose between tween a retreat upon Bordeaux, which would have led him to the centre of France, or a retreat upon Toulouse by moving along the frontier of the Pyrenees. In the same manner Frederick, in retiring from Moravia, marched upon Bohemia, instead of regaining Silesia. These parallel retreats are often preferable, inasmuch as they turn the enemy from a march upon the capitol of the State and upon the centre of its power; the configuration of the frontiers, the fortresses which are found there, the greater or less space which an army would find for moving, and re-establishing its direct communications with the centre of the State, are so many considerations which influence the opportuneness of these operations. Spain, amongst others, offers very gre
Emil Schalk, A. O., The Art of War written expressly for and dedicated to the U.S. Volunteer Army., Example of an oblique order of battle: battle of Leuthen, December 5, 1757. (search)
Duke of Bevern, had been defeated, near Breslau, by Field Marshal Daun, commander of the Austrian army, amounting to about 86,000 men. The king, hearing of this disaster after the victorious battle of Rosbach, hastened, with about 15,000 men, to Silesia, where he made a junction with the remaining portion of the army, commanded by the Duke of Bevern. His whole force amounted now to about 30,000 Battle of Leuthen. Dec. 5, 1757. men. Frederick addresses himself to his soldiers, telling them ostrian right wing in rear, and completely defeats it. The Austrian left wing, in the mean time being outflanked, is obliged to retreat. C C is the position of the Prussians after the battle. By this victory the king regained his provinces in Silesia. The Austrian loss amounted to nearly 50,000 men, including 32,000 prisoners. In this battle we distinguish three different actions — the main attack; a very short and insignificant feint attack, bearing more the character of a demonstration
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 2: Strategy.—General divisions of the Art.—Rules for planning a Campaign.—Analysis of the military operations of Napoleon (search)
battle. The positions of Napoleon at Rivoli, Verona, and Legnano, in 1796 and 1797, to watch the Adige; his positions on the Passarge, in 1807, and in Saxony and Silesia in front of his line of defence, in 1813; and Massena's positions on the Albis, along the Limmat and the Aar, in 1799, are examples under this head. Before proare those which an army will form in moving on the extremities of the opposing masses. For example, the lines of the Marne and the Seine, followed by the army of Silesia and the grand Austro-Russian army, in the campaign of 1814. Burgoyne's line of operations, in 1777, was double and exterior. Concentric lines are such as starear, and an Austrian force of 40,000 before him. But in 1806 the great superiority of his army enabled him to detach forces to besiege the principal fortresses of Silesia, and still to continue his operations with his principal forces. The chief of the army may meet the enemy under circumstances such as to induce or compel him to
Charles Congdon, Tribune Essays: Leading Articles Contributing to the New York Tribune from 1857 to 1863. (ed. Horace Greeley), The necessity of Servility. (search)
y as any other style of falsehood. Rome was great-Rome submitted to a Dictator — therefore all nations desiring to be great, must establish a Dictatorship, raising to that dignity some successful soldier. Greece was great — but then all her slaves were white — therefore no nation can be great without white slaves. Imperial France was great, but it was by theft — therefore no nation can be great without stealing territory. That is why Prussian Frederick is called Great — because he stole Silesia. Alexander frequently was carried to bed much intoxicated — therefore he was styled the Great--Drinker, we suppose, being understood. Jonathan Wild was dubbed the Great by Fielding — why remind our readers that the novelist meant The great thief? It is, we repeat, a pity that our General, who believes Greatness and Rascality to be convertible terms, did not expatiate a little upon his discovery. For our own part we have thought, fondly, we suppose, that the kind of greatness to w
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