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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,388 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 258 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 104 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 82 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 70 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 62 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 56 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) or search for New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 35 results in 31 document sections:

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ick off the garrison, man by man, thus giving an opportunity to a party of infantry to scale the walls of the fort. Such a storming, however, could only be accomplished by an immense sacrifice of life; and the only practicable mode of taking the fort would seem to be by a protracted siege, and by the unchristian mode of starving them.--South Carolinian. Major Anderson's course was sustained in the House of Representatives to-day, by the following resolution, offered by Mr. Adrian, of New Jersey: Resolved, That we fully approve the bold and patriotic act of Major Anderson in withdrawing from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter, and the determination of the President to maintain that fearless officer in his present condition; and we will support the President in all constitutional measures to enforce the laws and preserve the Union. To-day the arrest of Senators Toombs and Wigfall, on the charges of treason, for sending dispatches to the South recommending the seizure of the forts
pirit manifested by Mr. Seward and Charles Francis Adams with much severity of language; and there was an occasional stamping of feet and hissing, but no outbreak. Mr. Phillips was escorted home by a few policemen, and a great crowd pushing about him.--Springfield Republican. A Union meeting was held to-night at Trenton, N. J., Thomas J. Stryker, Cashier of the Trenton Bank, in the chair. The Committee on Resolutions reported, deploring the state of the country; recommending, as a means of settling differences, the adoption by the people of the Crittenden resolutions, or some other pacific measures, with such modifications as may be deemed expedient; recommending the Legislature of New Jersey to pass a law to take a vote of the people, yes or no, on the Crittenden resolutions; approving of the course of Virginia in appointing a Commission to go to Washington, and recommending the New Jersey Legislature to do the same. Speeches were made by Judge Naar, C. W. Jay, and others.
repare for the impending conflict. To this end, and for these purposes, and with a determination to repel invasion, Governor Letcher authorizes the Commanding General of the military forces to call out, and cause to be mustered into service from time to time, as the public exigencies may require, such additional number of volunteers as he may deem necessary.--(Doc. 129.) The First Regiment, Colonel Johnson; the Second, Col. Baker; the Third, Col. Napton; the Fourth, Col. Miller, of New Jersey Troops, with Brigadier-General Runyon and staff, left Bordentown for the seat of war, proceeding down the Delaware, via the Delaware and Chesapeake canal. The troops and stores, are in a fleet of fourteen steam propellers, the W. Woodward, Henry Cadwalader, Octorora, Delaware, Raritan, Trenton, Patroon, F. W. Brune, Elizabeth, Franklin, Farmer, J. B. Molleson, Eureka, and Fanny Gardner.--World, May 4. Union Ward meetings were held to-night throughout Baltimore, Md., and resolutions w
War Department would hereafter accept no troops for a less period than three years, unanimously offered their services to the Governor for the full term. The New Jersey House of Assembly ordered to a third reading the bill to raise a war loan of $1,000,000. Resolutions of thanks to Governor Olden for his activity in raising troops, to President Lincoln for his energetic defence of the Union, and pledging New Jersey to stand by the Union with all her power, were introduced into the Senate by a democrat, and passed by a unanimous vote.--N. Y. Tribune, May 8. The contributions of the people of the North for the war, during the last three weeks amount column with a free gift of $3, 500,000. New York and Ohio have each given $3,000,000; Connecticut and Illinois each $2,000,000; Maine, $1,300,000; Vermont and New Jersey, each $1,000,000; Wisconsin and Rhode Island, $500,000; Iowa, $100,000. The contributions of the principal cities are: New York, $2,173,000; Philadelphia, $330,
July 6. At Washington orders were issued as follows :--The State of Illinois and the States and territories West of the Mississippi and on this side of the Rocky Mountains, including New Mexico, will, in future, constitute a separate military command, to be known as the Western Department, under the command of Major-General Fremont, of the United States army, Headquarters at St. Louis. It having been ascertained to the satisfaction of the War Department, that First Lieutenant John Thomas Goode, of the Fourth Artillery, entertained, and had expressed treasonable designs against the Government of the United States, his name was stricken from the rolls of the army. Captain John McNab of the Tenth Infantry, having, while in command of Fort Laramie, given satisfactory evidence of his disloyalty to the Government, the President directed that his name be stricken from the roll of the army. The President also ordered the name of Assistant-Surgeon, Lafayette Gould, of the medica
s whole force of six thousand men, is also a graduate of West Point, and was the commandant there a few years ago.--(Doc. 87.) The Galveston (Texas) Civilian, of to-day, contains the following:--The San Antonio Ledger has late advices from New Mexico. Brigadier-General F. B. Stanton has arrived and organized two regiments for Lincoln's service. The first regiment is commanded by Ceran St. Vrain, Colonel. The Second Regiment is commanded by Miguel Pino, Colonel, and Manuel Chara, Lieutenan The Galveston (Texas) Civilian, of to-day, contains the following:--The San Antonio Ledger has late advices from New Mexico. Brigadier-General F. B. Stanton has arrived and organized two regiments for Lincoln's service. The first regiment is commanded by Ceran St. Vrain, Colonel. The Second Regiment is commanded by Miguel Pino, Colonel, and Manuel Chara, Lieutenant-Colonel. The Fifth and Seventh Regular Infantry have orders to march to the States. So we may look for trouble in New Mexico.
nassas, and on several other occasions during the existing war, as affording the highest evidence of your skill as a commander, your gallantry as a soldier, and your zeal as a patriot, you are promoted to be General in the Army of the Confederate States of America, and with the consent of the Congress will be duly commissioned accordingly. Yours, &c., Jeff. Davis. Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard, &c., &c., &c. The schooner S. J. Waring, captured by the privateer Jeff. Davis, on the night of the 16th instant, arrived at New York. When fifty miles south of Charleston, S. C., the colored steward, William Tillman, killed three of the prize crew with a hatchet. The other two were captured, but set at liberty on promising to work the vessel. Their names were James Milnor and James Dawsett, of New Jersey. Tillman, with the aid of the rest of the crew, except one man named Donald McLeod, who refused to assist on the recapture of the vessel, brought her to New York.--N. Y. World, July 22.
met a party of rebels about one hundred strong and gave them battle, killing two and taking thirty-three prisoners, also capturing thirty-five horses, without the loss of a man.--(Doc. 195.) The Jeffersonian newspaper office in West Chester, Pa., was quietly visited by a crowd and cleaned out.--There was no disturbance; most of the residents of the place were ignorant of what was going on until the work was effected.--Ohio Statesman, August 21. William Henry Odenheimer, Bishop of New Jersey, issued a pastoral letter to the clergy and laity of his diocese, appointing the service to be used on the fast day recommended by the President of the United States.--(Doc. 196.) Brigadier-General Hurlburt issued an order directing the authorities of Palmyra, Mo., to deliver up the marauders who fired upon the train of the St. Joseph and Hannibal Railroad on the evening of the 16th inst. In case of a refusal to comply, he signified his intention of levying contributions upon the coun
thrown across the track, and at the same time a number of armed men were seen rapidly descending a neighboring hill. The engineer increased the speed of the locomotive, and succeeded in throwing the ties off the track with but little damage to the engine. Some Federal scouts then fired into the train, it is supposed by mistake, but without doing any damage. The design of the secessionists was to take ex-Governor Thomas prisoner.--(Doc. 5.) The True American, the Democratic organ of New Jersey, published at Trenton, suspended this morning, giving as a reason for the act that the National authorities had virtually interdicted the publication of every paper that did not support the Government and Administration.--N. Y. Times, August 25. Two attempts were made in Connecticut to raise peace flags--one of which failed, while the other was successful. The first was at Stepney, ten miles north of Bridgeport. According to previous announcement a meeting was to have been organize
er, who surrendered to three hundred Texan Rangers, eighteen miles from Fort Fillmore, had been released on parole, the Texans retaining their arms and the horses belonging to the Mounted Rifles. Gen. Wm. Pelham, formerly Surveyor-General of New Mexico, and Col. Clements, were arrested at Santa Fe, and confined in the guard-house, by order of Col. Canby, of the Department of New Mexico. They were suspected of giving improper information to the Texas troops of Fort Bliss, below El Paso. Col. Clements took the oath of allegiance, and was discharged. Gen. Pelham refused to take the oath, and is still confined in the guard-house. Col. Canby, by proclamation, had suspended the writ of habeas corpus in New Mexico. Fort Stanton had been abandoned by the United States forces, and the fort afterward fired by order of Col. Canby.--National Intelligencer, September 2. At Middletown, New Jersey, a party of peace men attempted to hold a meeting, but were prevented by the presence of a l
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