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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,388 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 258 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 104 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 82 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 78 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 70 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 62 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 58 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 56 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 52 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) or search for New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) in all documents.

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I. Texas and New Mexico. Twiggs's treason Texas State Convention passes ordinance of Se the regulars their loyalty and sufferings New Mexico repeals act legalizing Slavery Canby in come Pass Rebels occupy Santa Fe they abandon New Mexico. The frontiers of Texas, Mexican and savast--Fort Bliss, on the usual route thence to New Mexico--was distant 675 miles. The whole number of nfederate service. Of the 1,200 regulars in New Mexico, one only deserted during this time of trial the entire act, leaving the statute-book of New Mexico clean of all complicity with the chattelizinSibley brigade, designed for the conquest of New Mexico. His funds were scanty, and the credit of homfortable subsistence were not to be had in New Mexico, nor nearer than Missouri, then a revolutionre completely the impossibility of attaching New Mexico to the Confederacy, or even of remaining in ical geographical position, the Territory of New Mexico is not worth a quarter of the blood expended[2 more...]
rs in the State Elections which soon followed, is still fairly disputable. By those elections, Horatio Seymour was made Governor of New York and Joel Parker of New Jersey: supplanting Governors Morgan and Olden; while Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, also gave Opposition majorities; and Michigan, Wisconsin, and most oth in the following table: 1860--President. 1862--Gov. Or Congress. States. Lincoln. All others. Admin. Opp. New York 362,646 312,510 295,897 306,649 New Jersey 58,324 62,801 46,710 61,307 Pennsylvania 268,030 208,412 215,616 219,140 Ohio 231,610 210,831 178,755 184,332 Indiana 13<*>,033 133,110 118,517 128,160entatives in Congress chosen from these States were politically classified as follows:   1860. 1862.   Repub. Dem. Admin. Opp. New York 23 10 14 17 New Jersey 2 3 1 4 Pennsylvania 18 7 12 12 Ohio 13 8 5 14 Indiana 7 4 4 7 Illinois 4 5 5 9 Michigan 4 0 5 1 Wisconsin 3 0 3 3 Iowa 2 0 6 0 Minnesot
nd it passed Apr. 2.--Yeas 32 (including Davis, of Ky., Henderson, of Mo., Thomson [Dem.], of N. J., and Willey, of Pa.); Nays--Messrs. Bayard and Saulsbury, of Del., Kennedy, of Md., Carlile, of Va., Powell, of Ky., Wilson, of Mo., Wright, of N. J., Latham, of Cal., Nesmith and Stark, of Oregon. It is noteworthy that a majority of these Nays were the votes of Senator from Border States, to of Del., Horton, of Ohio, Wm. Kellogg, of Ill., Killinger, of Pa., Mitchell, of Ind., Nixon, of N. J., Norton, of Ill., Porter, of Ind., A. H. Rice, of Mass., Stratton, of N. J., and Train, of Mass.N. J., and Train, of Mass. Mr. Porter, of Ind., now moved May 27. a reconsideration; which narrowly escaped defeat, on a motion by Mr. Holman that it do lie on the table: Yeas 69; Nays 73. The reconsideration prevailedeferred to the Judiciary Committee, and reported Feb. 11, 1862. against by Mr. Ten Eyck, of New Jersey. That report killed it. But Mr. Wilmot, of Pa., soon revived May 23. the proposition, by a
utely toward the enemy in this crisis bore but a slim proportion to that of their brethren who seemed just now to have urgent business east of the Susquehanna or west of the Ohio. In other words, the country was profoundly disheartened; while the Army had already absorbed what was bravest and most patriotic of its militia. The number who actually responded to these urgent, repeated, and most reasonable calls from the several States was (liberally estimated) as follows: New York15,000 New Jersey3,000 Pennsylvania25,000 Delaware2,000 Maryland5,000. Gen. Hooker had now begun June 13. to move his army northward-recrossing Howe's division and evacuating the valley of the Rappahannock. Lee had just about a fair week's start of him. Moving rapidly north-westward, with his cavalry thrown well out on his left flank, watching the passes of the Blue Ridge, Hooker's infantry passed through Dumfries, June 14-15. to Centerville, covering Washington, and watching for fresh develo
of Gillmore's initial success on Morris island, now pouring in from day to day, proved a quick succession of wet blankets for the spirits of the rioters. Gov. Seymour had been in the city on the Saturday previous; but left that afternoon for New Jersey, and did not return till Tuesday forenoon; when he was at once escorted to the City Hall, and thence addressed the crowd who flocked thither — many if not most of them from the mob just before menacing The Tribune office — as follows: My Fr,483 Paine, 29,207 And Maryland filled the measure of National triumph by electing Unionists to Congress in four of her five districts, and, for the first time, a distinctively Emancipation Controller and Legislature by some 20,000 majority. New Jersey chose only a Legislature this year, and hence evinced no essential change; while in Delaware, which had to choose specially a Representative in Congress, the Democrats withdrew their candidate on the eve of Election, insisting that the voters w
plaudits. For example, the ex-Rev. C. Chauncey Burr, of New Jersey, thus set forth his sympathy with the insurgents: Weicipated. Gen. McClellan secured the Electoral votes of New Jersey, Delaware, and Kentucky--21 in all: the residue--212 vania, Connecticut, Delaware, and perhaps New Hampshire, New Jersey, and Oregon. No election was held in the ten States w,69342,288 Vermont42,42213,325 New York368,726361,986 New Jersey60,72368,014 Pennsylvania296,389276,308 Delaware8,1158,16-- Minnesota2--2-- Missouri5481 New Hampshire213-- New Jersey1423 New York17142011 Ohio514172 Oregon1--1-- Pennsylermont--Collamer, Foot. New York — Harris, Morgan. New Jersey--Ten Eyck. Pennsylvania--Cowan. Maryland--Reverly son, Odell, Pomeroy, Radford, Steele, Van Valkenburg. New Jersey--Starr. Pennsylvania--Baily, Broomall, Coffroth, Hale, Townsend, Ward, Winfield, Ben. Wood, Fernando Wood. New Jersey--Perry, W. G. Steele. Pennsylvania--Ancona, Dawson, D
t, the garrison would be so paralyzed by the resulting earthquake as to facilitate a prompt seizure of the fort by its expectant besiegers. Delays in preparation occurred, as usual; Gen. Butler was ordered Nov. 1 1864. by telegraph to New York, to keep the peace there during the Presidential election; and, when he returned, Nov. 16. the powder experiment had been resolved on and preparation for it partially made. But Gen. Grant now left the front for a flying visit to his family in New Jersey, devolving on Gen. Butler the chief command; and, when he returned, of the 250 tons of powder required, 100 tons were still wanting, and did not arrive at Fortress Monroe till December: thus the expedition did not get fairly off till the 14th. Admiral Porter, commanding the naval part of it, was off Beaufort, N. C., on the 16th; though Gen. Butler, in advance of the transport fleet, had reached our blockaders off Wilmington the night before. The transports and troops were at Masonborough
31. Canby, Gen. E. R. S., organizes militia in New Mexico, 21; at Fort Craig, 22-3; Valverde. 22; holds NeNew Mexico, 25; in command of the trans-Mississippi department--Banks turns over his army to him, 551; aids in r Elections, 486; 739. Connolly, Gov. Henry, of New Mexico, 21. Connor, Brig.-Gen. P. E., 1st Cal. Vols.,ew Madrid, Mo., invested, 54; and taken, 54-5. New Mexico, loyalty of regulars in, 19; sufferings of, 20; a Petersburg, 734. Parker, Joel, chosen Gov. of New Jersey, 254. Parsons, Gen. M., killed at Pleasant Hilof Chickamauga, 424. Rencher, Gov. Abraham, of New Mexico, 21. Reno, Gen. Jesse L., with Burnside, 73; iey, Gen. H. F., organizes brigade for conquest of New Mexico, 21; at Fort Bliss, 22; Valverde, 22-3; Santa Fe, 24; abandons New Mexico, 25. Sickles, Gen. Daniel E., at Fredericksburg, 347; at Chancellorsville, 361; woLa., Banks's army marches to, 551. Simpson, Col., N. J., killed at Gaines's Mill, 157. Sinclair, Col. Wm.