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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 34 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 24 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 20 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for New York (New York, United States) or search for New York (New York, United States) in all documents.

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A National account. on board U. S. Steam transport General Banks, Lake Ponchartrain, La., Saturday April 4, 1863. The steamer from whose deck I write you is lying aground off Manchac Pass, with the One Hundred and Sixty-fifth regiment New-York volunteers (Second Duryea Zouaves) aboard, just returning from a successful expedition against the rebels at Ponchatoula. This regiment, since its arrival at New-Orleans early in January, has been encamped five miles from that city, within annd Lieutenant, E. Bayard Webster. Company F.--Captain, Gould H. Thorpe; First Lieutenant, James B. Vose; Second Lieutenant, Wm. J. Walker. There has been one death by disease, and three men have been accidentally killed since the regiment left New-York, on the eighteenth of December last. Private Spicer J. Ruderow, of company A, died, in January, of typhoid fever. Corporal David Brown, of company D, was shot during the same month, while on guard, by the accidental falling of a stack of muske
shall record cannot operate prejudicially to any subsequent movements. I presume the main facts of the movement will be chronicled in the rebel newspapers, and thoroughly discussed at rebel breakfast-tables several days ere this letter reaches New-York. The discovery of America by Columbus; the landing of the Pilgrims at Plymouth, are prominent facts of American history; the initiatory movement of movements, and the grand movement of the great expedition which is to reduce the hotbed of secesge, and as a consequence there were not a few cases of casting up Jonah on tile Expounder. En route down the coast the steamships Ericsson and S. R. Spaulding, proceeding in opposite directions to us, were successively passed, the former from New-York bound for Port Royal towing a nondescript looking raft. The Spaulding had troops on board. At half-past 11 o'clock the Expounder and Belvidere arrived off Stono Inlet. From this point, looking landward, the gunboats Pawnee and Commodore McD
still occupying the same ground, near the tavern, and defending this position with great firmness and gallantry ; the fourth regiment (the Twenty-ninth regiment New-York volunteers) he had sent to the north side of the road, to fill the place lately occupied by the Second brigade, before its detachment. The attack of the enemy wd and wounded four hundred and ninety-four men and two officers; among the latter, three regimental commanders, Col. Jones, One Hundred and Fifty-fourth regiment New-York volunteers; Lieut.-Col. Hartmann, Twenty-ninth regiment New-York volunteers; and Lieut.-Col. Moore, of Third Pennsylvania volunteers. Col. Buschbeck lost two New-York volunteers; and Lieut.-Col. Moore, of Third Pennsylvania volunteers. Col. Buschbeck lost two aids, Capt. Bode, seriously wounded, and Lieut. Grimm, both probably in the hands of the enemy. I must speak in high terms of Col. Adolph Buschbeck for his gallantry and determination, and for the complete control he retained over his command during the whole time of the engagement; also, of his Acting Assistant Adjutant-General,
e batteries on the enemy's right. It was owing to some misunderstanding. The charge cost us heavily in killed and wounded. General Sherman led the attack in person, and fell severely wounded in the leg. General Neal Dow was also wounded. Colonel Clarke, of the Sixth Michigan, was killed. Colonel Cowles, of the One Hundred and Twenty-eighth New-York, also, by a bayonet thrust; Lieutenant-Colonel Smith of the Zouaves, severely wounded. The Sixth Michigan and One Hundred and Twenty-eight New-York have each lost about half their effective men, and the other regiments have suffered severely. The attack on the centre of the enemy's position by the columns of Generals Augur and Grover, also exhibited the most terrible fighting and the same obstinate resistance. Our troops here, as well as on the right and left, did all that men could do, and held every inch of ground they gained. The enemy were driven, foot by foot, out of their rifle-pits and intrenchments, into their main works,
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