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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 891 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 266 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 146 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 138 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 132 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 122 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 120 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 106 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 80 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 78 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Ohio (Ohio, United States) or search for Ohio (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

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ences. It was as close hand-to-hand work as could be, sometimes skirmisher to skirmisher, and at others two whole brigades driving like two mad streams together. Ohio lost severely in men in all the fights in front, but she gained new lustre and renown for her already glorious history. Sunday evening, at half-past 4 o'clock, ths and majors straggling hither and thither, the whole field and staff of the One Hundred and Sixteenth Ohio came through as they should. Thus it will be seen that Ohio did take some part in the fight. The One Hundred and Sixteenth Ohio had three companies completely destroyed; while the other three Ohio regiments took the most cOhio regiments took the most conspicuous places in the fight. J. M. D. Letter to the President of the United States, Explanatory of the Evidence before the Court of Inquiry relative to the Evacuation of Winchester, Va., by the Command of Major-General R. H. Milroy. To His Excellency Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States: sir: Under Specia
witnessed before, and victory at last! Victory for a fated army, and salvation for the imperilled country! It were folly for one unaided man, leaving the ground within a few hours after the battle has died fitfully out, to undertake a minute detail of the operations on all parts of the field. I dare only attempt the merest outline of its leading features — then off for Cincinnati by the speediest routes. I have been unable even to learn all I sought concerning the part some of our own Ohio regiments bore — of individual brigades and regiments and batteries I can in the main say nothing. But what one man, not entirely unfamiliar with such scenes before, could see, passing over the ground before, during, and after the fight, I saw; for the rest I must trust to such credible statements by the actors as I have been able to collect. The battle-field. Whoever would carry in his mind a simple map of our positions in the great battles of Thursday and Friday, the second and third
Doc. 47.-Morgan's invasion of Ohio. Account by an eye-witness. on the twenty-seventh of June, 1863, the Second and Seventh Ohio cavalry and the Forth-fifth Ohio mounted infantry, together and importance the remarkable event of bringing about and causing the first battle of the war in Ohio, and the first in her history as a State. But the sensation of the State is over, and the great o or three days of the raid, and were laid low by the unerring aim of the sturdy farmer of South-western Ohio, so suddenly called to the defence of his home and happy fireside. The loyal women of Ppursuit and defeat of the rebels was the wonderful stories of John Morgan and his conduct through Ohio. Some had it that he was a perfect gentleman --that most vulgar of phrases to express one of the hazard nothing in bespeaking for them the lasting gratitude of the patriotic and loyal people of Ohio. E. B. Another account. Cincinnati, July 28, 1863. Mr. Editor: Upon the invitation o
unce the recent assumption of a military commander to seize and try a citizen of Ohio, Clement L. Vallandigham, for no other reason than words addressed to a public m peril of our cause abroad. And that, regarding the blow struck at a citizen of Ohio as aimed at the rights of every citizen of the North, we denounce it as against one has ever pretended that the writ of habeas corpus was suspended in the State of Ohio, where the arrest of a citizen at midnight, already referred to, was made, re is the justification for the monstrous proceeding in the case of a citizen of Ohio, to which we have called your attention? We know that a recreant judge, whose nington: I can touch a bell on my right hand and order the arrest of a citizen of Ohio. I can touch the bell again and order the imprisonment of a citizen of New-Yorkwas then, as you truly state, under martial or military law. This was not so in Ohio, where Mr. Vallandigham was arrested. The administration of the civil law had n
roclamation.By the President of the United States of America. Whereas, the armed insurrectionary combinations now existing in several of the States are threatening to make inroads into the States of Maryland, Western Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Ohio, requiring immediately an additional military force for the service of the United States. Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, and Commander of the army and navy thereof, and of the militia of the several States we actual service, do hereby call into the service of the United States one hundred thousand militia from the States following, namely: From the State of Maryland, ten thousand. From the State of Pennsylvania, fifty thousand. From the State of Ohio, thirty thousand. From the State of West-Virginia, ten thousand. To be mustered into the service of the United States forthwith, and to serve for the period of six months from the date of such muster into said service, unless sooner dis
our own State. To meet this horde of rebels, the President of the United States has, by proclamation, called out one hundred thousand militia for the period of six months, unless sooner discharged. Of this force, thirty thousand are called from Ohio. And now, gallant men of Ohio, will you promptly respond to this necessary call without hesitancy? I have assured the President that you would do so. Remember that our own sacred homes are threatened with pillage and destruction, and our wivesOhio, will you promptly respond to this necessary call without hesitancy? I have assured the President that you would do so. Remember that our own sacred homes are threatened with pillage and destruction, and our wives and daughters with insult. To the rescue, then, at once, and thus save all that is dear to man. As we have but few, if any, regularly organized companies of volunteer militia, I can but invite and implore you to duty. The few companies which have been recently organized are requested to repair at once, with their entire force, to the camps hereinafter indicated. All others will go forward in squads, and be organized into companies after their arrival in camp, for which purpose efficient of
Doc. 103.-Morgan's raid through Kentucky. Journal of Lieutenant-Colonel Alston. the following is the journal of Lieutenant-Colonel Alston, Morgan's Chief of Staff, who was captured by the national pickets on the fifth of July. The journal is complete from the morning of the first to noon of the eighth, at which time he was sent to Camp Chase, Ohio. July 1st, 1863.--On the banks of the Cumberland. The river very high. No boats. General M. obliged to build a number of boats, which he accomplished with very little delay, and commenced crossing at sundown. July 2d.--Bucksville. He had great difficulty in making the horses swim, but by united and systematic exertion succeeded in getting the entire command of----regiments over by ten A. M., though the command was very much scattered. At eleven o'clock, scouts came into Bucksville and reported the enemy advancing, and within four miles of the town. It was supposed to be only a scouting party, and a portion of Dick Morg
ission for Hon. C. L. Vallandigham to return to Ohio : See Doc. 67, page 298, ante. The lette Clement L. Vallandigham, a citizen of the State of Ohio, not belonging to the land or naval forcesult offered to the sovereignty of the people of Ohio, by whose organic law it is declared that no peidate for nomination by the Democratic party of Ohio, for the office of Governor of the State; that onal knowledge of the feelings of the people of Ohio, that the public safety will be far more endangention. I am unable to perceive an insult to Ohio in the case of Mr. Vallandigham. Quite surely,he has never made a speech before the people of Ohio in which he has not counselled submission and oude of themselves or of the Democratic party in Ohio encourages desertions, resistance to the draft, the two years in which the Democratic party of Ohio has been constrained to oppose the policy of ths a favor, but as a right, due to the people of Ohio, and with a view to avoid the possibility of co[12 more...]
Lieut.-Colonel Commanding Eighth Michigan Cavalry. Official report of Colonel Hill. headquarters Second brigade Ohio militia, Zanesville, Ohio, July 24, 1863. To His Excellency David Tod, Governor of Ohio: By order of Colonel Benjamin BOhio: By order of Colonel Benjamin B. Runkle, commanding division Ohio militia, I left Scott's Landing on the morning of the twenty-second instant, with a portion of my brigade, for the purpose of intercepting Morgan's forces on the Muskingum River, at any point where he might attempt Ohio militia, I left Scott's Landing on the morning of the twenty-second instant, with a portion of my brigade, for the purpose of intercepting Morgan's forces on the Muskingum River, at any point where he might attempt to cross. His movements during the day, as indicated by my scouts, led me to suspect he would attempt to cross at Beverly, or at some other point between that place and McConnellsville — most probably at Windsor. Placing guards at the fords, and core of the entire rebel force rendered their departure unnecessary. Losses caused by Morgan's raid. Jackson C. H. Ohio, August 8, 1863. The Military Committee of this county were engaged seven days in taking testimony as to the losses cau
was not the man to forget past favors. As soon as the Eldridge was surrendered, the house was searched. The inmates of the rooms were aroused from their beds, and their money, jewelry, and other valuables, demanded of them. Some gentlemen from Ohio who occupied one room were not as expeditious as the guerrillas thought, and they commenced firing through the door. One ball took effect in the calf of the leg of one of them. This same man was again shot through the shoulder, but is now doing where they could be protected by the few soldiers across the river. The men prowled through the house, but did not find what they wanted. Finally they ordered all in the house to form a line outside. This was done. One gentleman answered, Central Ohio. The fellow said that was as bad as Kansas, and shot him, but the wound did not prove fatal. Others were shot. Mr. Stone remonstrated with them, when one of them shot him through the head, killing him almost instantly. The party then left.
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