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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 891 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 266 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 146 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 138 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 132 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 122 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 120 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 106 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 80 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 78 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Ohio (Ohio, United States) or search for Ohio (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 2: Lee's invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania. (search)
the Monongahela, with Headquarters at Pittsburg. The Middle Department was under the command of General Schenck, Headquarters at Baltimore. On the 12th, Governor Curtin, of that State, issued a call for the entire militia of the commonwealth to turn out to defend its soil, but it was feebly responded to; and on the 15th, the President called upon the States nearest the capital for an aggregate of one hundred thousand militia. Maryland was called upon for 10,000 men; Pennsylvania, 50,000; Ohio, 30,000; and West Virginia, 10,000. This, too, was tardily and stingily answered, while uniformed and disciplined regiments of the city of New York so promptly marched toward the field of danger that the Secretary of War publicly thanked the Governor of that State for the exhibition of patriotism. Despondency had produced apathy, and it appeared, for the moment, as if the patriotism of the loyalists was waning, and that the expectation of the Confederates, of a general cry for peace in the F
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 3: political affairs.--Riots in New York.--Morgan's raid North of the Ohio. (search)
Morgan's raid in Indiana, 93. Morgan's raid in Ohio, 94. Morgan and his men in peril, 95. capturecommand of a military department which included Ohio, issued a general order for the suppression of pathy. Meanwhile, the Democratic Convention of Ohio had nominated him for Governor. The arrest oorder, pledged, if elected Governor of the State of Ohio, to array it against Lincoln and the war, ned, ended, and at the election for Governor of Ohio, a few months later, the assumption of the Comm and so was the raid of Morgan into Indiana and Ohio, at about the same time, which we shall considen, from village to village, in the direction of Ohio, plundering, destroying, and levying contributiaded horses for fresh ones from the pastures of Ohio farmers, and plundered somewhat less for want oing more critical every hour. Governor Tod, of Ohio, like Governor Morton, of Indiana, had summonedofficers were taken to Columbus, the capital of Ohio, and confined in felon cells in the Penitentiar[13 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 4: campaign of the Army of the Cumberland from Murfreesboro'to Chattanooga. (search)
s exceedingly anxious to move. The expedition consisted of the Fifty-first Indiana, Eightieth Illinois, and a part of two Ohio regiments, numbering in all about eighteen hundred men, commanded by Colonel A. D. Streight, of the first-named regiment. March 30. the raid of Colonel H. S. Sanders into East Tennessee, June. and the extensive raid of Morgan into Indiana and Ohio, July. already mentioned. Pegram was a Virginian, and crossed the Cumberland Mountains and river with a considerable forsburg. Similar orders were sent to Schofield, in Missouri, and Pope, in the Northwestern Department; and the commanders in Ohio and Kentucky were ordered to make every exertion to secure Rosecrans's communications. It was determined that Bragg shoulof officers was 974. It is probable the entire Union loss was full 19,000. Among the killed were General W. H. Lytle, of Ohio, Colonels Baldwin and Heg, commanding brigades, and Colonels E. A. King, Alexander, and Gilmer. The Confederate loss, acc
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 5: the Chattanooga campaign.--movements of Sherman's and Burnside's forces. (search)
the skillful management of Colonel D. E. McCallum, the Government Superintendent of railways, and W. Prescott Smith, Master of Transportation on the Baltimore and Ohio road. In the space of eight days, the two corps, twenty thousand strong, marched from the Rapid Anna to Washington, and were thence conveyed through West Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee, to the Tennessee River. Halleck determined to hold Chattanooga and East Tennessee at all hazards. For that purpose he ordered the concentration of three armies there, under one commander, and on the 16th of October, 1863. an order went out from the War Department, saying: By order of the Presi York, Colonel Greenwood Colonel Smith's regiment was commanded on the occasion by Captain Thomas Higgins, acting Major. These were very thin regiments. Those of Ohio and Massachusetts numbered only about two hundred effective men each. No troops, said Hooker, in his report of the battle, ever rendered more brilliant service.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 6: siege of Knoxville.--operations on the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia. (search)
the great advancement of the National cause ; and in a brief letter to Grant, Dec. 8. he thanked that soldier and his men for their skill and bravery in securing a lodgment at Chattanooga and Knoxville. Congress voted thanks and a gold medal for Grant, Dec. 17. and directed the President of the Republic to cause the latter to be struck with suitable emblems, devices, and inscriptions. Grant was the recipient of other tokens of regard of various kinds; and the Legislatures of New York and Ohio voted him thanks in the name of the people of those great States. The writer visited the theater of events recorded in this and the two chapters immediately preceding it, in the spring of 1866. He left Murfreesboroa on the morning of the 10th of May, See page 553, volume II. with his traveling companions already mentioned (Messrs. Dreer and Greble), and went by railway to Chattanooga. It was a very interesting journey, for along the entire route, at brief intervals, we saw vestiges of
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 8: Civil affairs in 1863.--military operations between the Mountains and the Mississippi River. (search)
e majorities of the Opposition the previous year See page 18. were wiped out, and the weight of their numbers appeared largely on the Republican or Union side. Ohio, as we have observed, gave over a hundred thousand majority against Vallandigham; and in New York, Governor Seymour's majority, of ten thousand in 1862, was annihiratz Brown, J. B. Henderson. New Hampshire.--John P. Hale, Daniel Clarke. Yew Jersey.--William Wright, John C. Ten Eyck. New York.--Edwin D. Morgan, Ira Harris. Ohio.--Benjamin F. Wade, John Sherman. Oregon.--Benjamin F. Harding, G. W. Nesmith. Pennsylvania.--Charles R. Buckalew, Edward Cowan. Rhode Island.--William Sprague, n, Thomas T. Davis, Theodore M. Pomeroy, Daniel Morris, Giles W. Hotchkiss, R. B. Van Valkenburg, Freeman Clarke, Augustus Frank, John B. Ganson, Reuben E. Fenton. Ohio.--George H. Pendleton, Alexander Long, Robert C. Schenck, J. F. McKinney, Frank C. Le Blond, Chilton A. White, Samuel S. Cox, William Johnson, Warren P. Noble, Jam
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 9: the Red River expedition. (search)
e three bearing about four hundred soldiers, were fired upon May 5. at Dunn's Bayou, thirty miles below Alexandria, by a large Confederate force, at the morning twilight, and were so badly injured that the Covington was abandoned and burnt, and the other two vessels were surrendered. Of the soldiers, about one hundred and fifty were captured, and about one hundred were killed. The remainder took to the shore and escaped. Soon afterward, the City Belle, with a little more than four hundred Ohio troops, was captured by another guerrilla party, when about one-half of them escaped. But the army in its march for Simms' Port met with very little opposition, excepting by a considerable force of Confederate cavalry, who, at daybreak on the 16th, confronted its advance at Mansura, near Marksville, where the National skirmishers and artillery, after pushing the foe back across an open prairie to a wood, kept up a fire for about three hours, until the main body came up. A battle-line was t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 10: the last invasion of Missouri.--events in East Tennessee.--preparations for the advance of the Army of the Potomac. (search)
ern members of these secret leagues, and that C. L. Vallandigham was the Grand Commander of the Northern members, composed of the general and local leaders of the Peace Faction, and their dupes. It was also reported that Vallandigham was to enter Ohio boldly from Canada, to take part in the Democratic Convention for nominating a candidate for President, which was to meet at Chicago. It was also discovered that arms were extensively coming into the State, and distributed secretly among the sympinced entire confidence in him, and a disposition to furnish him with all necessary materials for making a vigorous and decisive campaign. Volunteering was rapidly increasing; and on the 21st of April 1864. the Governors of the younger States of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, and Wisconsin, tendered to the President the services. of one hundred thousand men, for one hundred days, without requiring any bounty to be paid or the service charged or credited on any draft. This patriotic offer was
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 11: advance of the Army of the Potomac on Richmond. (search)
way he had advanced, for a heavy Confederate force might easily be thrown upon his rear by means of the Virginia Central railway; so he retired westward to Salem, hotly pursued as far as that place, and then made his way, with a very scanty supply of food for man and beast, over the mountains, by the village of New Castle, to Meadow Bridge, in the direction of the Kanawha. There, only a few days before, Crook and Averill had left a million and a half of rations in charge of two regiments of Ohio one hundred days men, and expected to find a supply for the famishing army. They were disappointed. A band of guerrillas had swept away rations and men, and it was not until the 27th June, 1864. that a supply was obtained. The army had suffered dreadfully in that exhausted mountain region, and was much weaker in numbers and moral strength than when it left Staunton. It had inflicted vast injury upon the Confederates in the destruction of founderies, mills, factories, and other property o
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 16: career of the Anglo-Confederate pirates.--closing of the Port of Mobile — political affairs. (search)
neral rising of the members of this organization in Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Kentucky, in co-operation with a force under Price, who was to invade Misso. 5, 1862 was nominated for the office of President, and George H. Pendleton, of Ohio, for Vice-President. The latter, in Congress and out of it, had been, next to Vnnsylvania--Cowan; Maryland, Reverdy Johnson; West Virginia--Van Winkle, Willey; Ohio--Sherman, Wade; Indiana--Lane; Illinois--Trumbull; Missouri--Brown, Henderson; MWest Virginia--Blair, Brown, Whaley; Kentucky--Anderson, Kendall, Smith, Yeaman; Ohio--Ashley, Eckley, Garfield, Hutchins, Schenck, Spaulding; Indiana--Colfax, Derwen, Strause; Maryland--Harris; Kentucky--Clay, Grider, Harding, Malloy, Wadsworth; Ohio--Bliss, Cox, Finck, Johnson, Long, Morris, Noble, O'Neill. Pendleton, C. A. Whiia; Marcy, New Hampshire; McDowell and Voorhees, Indiana; Le Blond and McKinney, Ohio; Middleton and Rogers, New Jersey. Thus the nation, for the first time in its li
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