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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 891 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 266 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 146 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 138 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 132 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 122 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 120 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 106 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 80 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 78 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Ohio (Ohio, United States) or search for Ohio (Ohio, United States) in all documents.

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he Confederate forces in south-eastern Kentucky, intrenched at Paintville, Johnson county, intent on gathering supplies and recruiting. Col. James A. Garfield, of Ohio, commanding a Union brigade consisting of the 42d Ohio, 14th Kentucky, and a squadron of Ohio cavalry, moved up the Big Sandy early in 1862, occupying Paintville Ohio cavalry, moved up the Big Sandy early in 1862, occupying Paintville Jan. 7, 1862. without resistance, and pushing on to Prestonburg, Floyd county; hear which town, at the forks of Middle creek, he encountered Marshall, whom he put to flight with little loss on either side. Garfield reported his full strength in this engagement at 1,800, and estimated that of Marshall at 2,500. Marshall was obln a skirmish, in which he took 200 prisoners, striking the Charleston and Memphis Railroad at Glendale, three miles farther, and partially destroying it; while the Ohio road was in like manner broken at Purdy. Col. Elliott, with two regiments of cavalry, was dispatched on the night of the 27th to flank Corinth and cut the railr
portune arrival of Thomas's brigade of Hill's division; while the left of Jackson's division, under Taliaferro, was so assailed in flank and rear that one brigade was routed and the whole flank gave way, as did also Early's. But the odds were too heavy; and, though our men proved themselves heroes, they could not defeat three times their number, holding the foot of a mountain and covered by woods. The best blood of the Union was poured out like water, but in vain. Gen. Geary, who, with five Ohio regiments and the 28th Pennsylvania, made the most desperate charge of the day, was himself wounded, with most of his officers. Gen. Crawford's brigade came out of the fight a mere skeleton. The 109th Pennsylvania, 102d New York, and several other regiments, left half their number dead or wounded on that fatal field. Gens. Augur and Carroll were severely wounded; as were Cols. Donnelly, 46th Pa., Creighton, 7th Ohio, and Majors Savage, 2d Mass., Armstrong, 5th Ohio, and Pelouze, Banks's Ad
austed; when the brigade commanders were called together and assented. A white flag was thereupon raised; but the Rebels, not perceiving it, continued their fire some 30 to 40 minutes, whereby Miles was mortally wounded. Jackson was just impelling a general infantry attack, when informed that the white flag had been raised on the defenses. At 8 A. M., a capitulation was agreed to, under which 11,583 men were passed over to the enemy — about half of them New Yorkers; the residue mainly from Ohio and Maryland. Nearly all were raw levies; some of them militia, called out for three months. Among the spoils were 73 guns, ranging from excellent to worthless; 13,000 small arms, 200 wagons, and a large quantity of tents and camp-equipage. Of horses, provisions, and munitions, the captures were of small account. Jackson, whose appreciation of the value of time was unsurpassed, did not wait to receive the surrender; but, leaving that duty to Hill, hurried off the mass of his followers to
had concentrated all his available force for an offensive movement, had been thoroughly beaten at Corinth, and had then retreated, blowing up his ammunition wagons and caissons; their men throwing away their camp and garrison equipage in the flight. The weather was cool; the roads were dry, and likely to be so for a month to come. Corn was ripe, and, as yet, untouched. We had 3,000,000 of rations in Corinth, and ammunition for six months. There was but one bridge injured on the Mobile and Ohio road; and it could be put in running order by a regiment in half a day. The enemy were so alarmed that, when Hamilton sent a reconnoissance to Blackland, they vacated Tupelo, burning even the bacon which they could not take away on the first train. I had eighty wagon-loads of assorted rations which had reached me that night at Ripley, and had ordered the 30,000 from Chewalla to Hurlbut. believing the Rebel army utterly demoralized and incapable of resistance; but he was directed to desist a
reference to certain anti-Slavery resolves recently offered by Mr. Giddings, of Ohio, and the action of the House thereupon, said: What I am now to say, I say wihat, so far as I could understand the resolutions proposed by the gentleman from Ohio [Mr. Giddings], there were some of them for which I was ready to vote, and some vote, as I have said, against one of the resolutions of my excellent friend from Ohio [Mr. Giddings], or should at least have required that it be amended in conformitarker of New Jersey: supplanting Governors Morgan and Olden; while Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, also gave Opposition majorities; and Michigan, Wisconsiny 58,324 62,801 46,710 61,307 Pennsylvania 268,030 208,412 215,616 219,140 Ohio 231,610 210,831 178,755 184,332 Indiana 13<*>,033 133,110 118,517 128,160 Opp. New York 23 10 14 17 New Jersey 2 3 1 4 Pennsylvania 18 7 12 12 Ohio 13 8 5 14 Indiana 7 4 4 7 Illinois 4 5 5 9 Michigan 4 0 5 1 Wisconsi
f Ohio, while ably advocated by Mr. Bingham, of Ohio; and passed by a (substantially) party vote: Yeson, of Mass., Howard, of Michigan, Sherman, of Ohio, McDougall, of Cal., and Anthony, of R. I., andf Ill., Dunn, of Ind., Cox and Vallandigham, of Ohio; and passed under the Previous Question: Yeas 9ted as an emancipationist. Messrs. Sherman, of Ohio, Doolittle, of Wise., Browning, of Ill., and Modid not vote on the final passage. Mr. Cox, of Ohio, stigmatized it in debate as a bill for the benholders in the Territories. Messrs. Bingham, of Ohio, Stevens and Kelley, of Pa., R. Conkling and Dif Mass., Howard, of Mich., Wade and Sherman, of Ohio, Morrill and Fessenden, of Maine, Clark and Hal Y., Dunn, of Ind., Fisher, of Del., Horton, of Ohio, Wm. Kellogg, of Ill., Killinger, of Pa., Mitchr. 19. an amendment proposed by Mr. Sherman, of Ohio, excepting the act of 1793 from the contemplatere of members--Messrs. Mallory, of Ky., Cox, of Ohio, and others, opposing it as equivalent to annul[4 more...]
June 9. from the War Department had constituted of Pennsylvania two new Military Departments — that of the Susquehanna (eastern),under Gen. Couch; that of the Monongahela, Gen. W. T. H. Brooks; and Gov. Curtin had called June 12. out the entire militia of that State--the call, though loud and shrill, awaking but few and faint responses. Now the President called June 15. specifically on the nearest States for militia, as follows: Maryland10,000 Pennsylvania50,000 New York20,000 Ohio30,000 West Virginia10,000. The Governors reechoed the call; but the response was still weak. The uniformed and disciplined regiments of New York City generally and promptly went on; and Gov. Seymour was publicly thanked therefore by Secretary Stanton; but the number of Pennsylvanians, Marylanders, and West Virginians, who set their faces resolutely toward the enemy in this crisis bore but a slim proportion to that of their brethren who seemed just now to have urgent business east of th
Xviii. The Chattanooga campaign.—Middle and East Tennessee. Morgan's raid through Kentucky into Indiana and Ohio he is surrounded, routed, and captured his imprisonment and escape Rosecrans advances from Murfreesboro by Shelbyville and Tullahoma, to the Tennessee at Bridgeport Bragg flanked out of Chattanooga Rosecest. Passing thence through Versailles, July 12. and making capital bargains in horse-trades all along, his followers concentrated at Harrison, just across the Ohio line; sweeping around Cincinnati July 13-14. at distances of 7 to 20 miles, and pushing thence by Miamisville, Williamsburg, Sardinia, Piketon, and Jackson, then. D. C. McCallum, government superintendent of railroads, M. C. Meigs, Quartermaster General, and W. Prescott Smith, master of transportation on the Baltimore and Ohio road: the two corps marching from the Rapidan to Washington, taking cars, and being transported by Cumberland, Wheeling, Cincinnati, Louisville, and Nashville, to
f Albany thereon President Lincoln's response Ohio Democratic Convention's resolves Vallandigham Judge Leavitt, of the U. S. District Court for Ohio, was applied to for a writ of habeas corpus to ilitary commander to seize and try a citizen of Ohio, Clement L. Vallandigham, for no other reason tthat, regarding the blow struck at a citizen of Ohio as aimed at the rights of every citizen of the r the sentiments of a majority of the people of Ohio, said: June 26. Mr. Vallandigham may difereby prevail on other influential gentlemen of Ohio to so define their position as to be of immenseas a favor, but as a right due to the people of Ohio, and with a view to avoid the possibility of coter to the popular forum, where — especially in Ohio — it was continued with decided frankness as we Mr. Vallandigham, to discuss public affairs in Ohio — ay, even here, the temporary agents of the soFederal Judge ever made a contrary decision. Ohio — by reason of the unrevoked and continuing ban[3 more.
Johnson, William Johnson, King, Knapp, Law, Long, Marcy, McKinney, William II. Miller, James R. Morris, Morrison, Noble, John O'Neill, Pendleton, Sainuel J. Randall, Rogers, Ross, Scott, Stiles, Strouse, Stuart, Chilton A. White, Joseph W. White, Yeaman. No other War measure was so strenuously, unitedly, persistently, vehemently resisted by the Opposition, whether Democratic or Border-State Unionists, as was the proposal to arm Blacks to uphold the National cause. Said Mr. S. S. Cox, of Ohio: I believe the object of gentlemen, in forcing this bill here, is to bring about — or, rather, to make final and forever — a dissolution of the Union. * * * Every man along the border [Ohio] will tell you that the Union is for ever rendered hopeless if you pursue this policy of taking the slaves from the masters and arming them in this civil strife. The regular, authorized, avowed employment of Blacks in the Union armies — not as menials, but as soldiers — may be said to have begun w
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