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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,468 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,286 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 656 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 566 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 440 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 416 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 360 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 298 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 298 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 272 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 19, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) or search for South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 6 document sections:

Congressional. Washington, Jan. 18. --Senate.--The Ohio Legislature's coercion resolutions were tabled. Mr. Sumner presented resolutions calling for correspondence with foreign countries in relation to South Carolina clearances.--Laid over. Many Union petitions from Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Michigan were presented. Mr. Cameron's motion to reconsider the vote defeating Crittenden's resolutions was carried--27 to 24--Mr. Dixon, of Connecticut, voting aye. They were made the order for Monday next. Mr. Green moved a joint resolution looking to a peaceful separation by general Convention, which, he said subsequently, he introduced for the purpose of calling attention directly to the subject. Mr. Crittenden objected. The Kansas bill came up, and Messrs. Douglas, Seward, Green and Collamar spoke. Green's amendment, changing the boundaries, was defeated. House.--Mr. Moore, of Ky., explained why he did not vote for Adriana Anderson's laudati
son with his whole power. Others say they won't send another man. I hear that Anderson himself is utterly opposed to the coercion system, and would gladly resign if he could do so with honor. If he had known of the understanding between the South Carolina authorities and the President in regard to the maintenance of the status, he would never have put himself and his men to the trouble of fortifying Fort Moultrie; still less would he have gone to Sumter. This I get from first rate authority. ladly resign if he could do so with honor. If he had known of the understanding between the South Carolina authorities and the President in regard to the maintenance of the status, he would never have put himself and his men to the trouble of fortifying Fort Moultrie; still less would he have gone to Sumter. This I get from first rate authority. Two of Anderson's wife's brothers are in the South Carolina army, and, as I have perhaps already told you, he is himself a large slaveholder. Zed.
The Daily Dispatch: January 19, 1861., [Electronic resource], Arrival from the "Foreign" port of Charleston, S. C. (search)
the Port of Charleston, State of South Carolina," printed in the margin. After "the 85th year of the," the words "Independence of the United States of America" are crossed out, and below is written, "Sovereignty and Independence of the State of South Carolina." The Secessionists thus claiming an independency co-existent with that of the Union from which they have seceded. The clearance paper has undergone the same erasures and interlineations. They were signed by W. F. Colcock, Collector, athe Union from which they have seceded. The clearance paper has undergone the same erasures and interlineations. They were signed by W. F. Colcock, Collector, and John Lawrence, Naval Officer. The Custom-House officers not having been notified that South Carolina was out of the Union, refused to enter the vessel under the bogus papers, and as Capt. Ryder sails under a coastwise license, it was not regarded as necessary that he should have cleared at all from Charleston.--Boston Journal.
The Daily Dispatch: January 19, 1861., [Electronic resource], Arrival from the "Foreign" port of Charleston, S. C. (search)
State of things in South Carolina. It is utterly impossible to keep pace with the falsehoods of the Black Republican press in regard to South Carolina. One of their favorite inventions is the financial and physical distress in Charleston. SomeSouth Carolina. One of their favorite inventions is the financial and physical distress in Charleston. Sometimes they are contradicted by their own correspondents. --Thus the New York Evening Post says: Private letters received here report that the secession sentiment is rapidly diminishing under the odium which is created by forced loans and starvation. foreign exchange, and are still ready to buy. That admirable paper, the New York Express, has also a letter from South Carolina, showing that there is no want of food, and no want of any kind in South Carolina, and that there never has been a moe New York Express, has also a letter from South Carolina, showing that there is no want of food, and no want of any kind in South Carolina, and that there never has been a mob, or a mob spirit, or any materials for a mob in the city of Charleston.
Practical Joking. --The Charleston Mercury published recently a letter from "Castle Thomas building," Louisville, Ky., offering to South Carolina the services of Captain Fred. Myers and his "low mounted minute men." It turns out that "Castle Thomas" is the Louisville jail, the "low minute men" are the chain-gang, and Capt. Myers is one of the desperadoes.
Utah and South Carolina. When that abominable nest of murder, incest and polygamy, the Territory of Utah which it is no figure of speech to call a Sodom was in open rebellion against the General Government, Mr. Buchanan sent Peace Commissioners with the Army, to offer Utah the Olive Branch, before the Sword was drawn.--To South Carolina, a sovereign State, one of the most civilized, virtuous, and exemplary of Christian communities, where, so great is the purity of domestic life, not a divoSouth Carolina, a sovereign State, one of the most civilized, virtuous, and exemplary of Christian communities, where, so great is the purity of domestic life, not a divorce has occurred since the Revolution, he sends no Peace Commissioners — he sends only the Sword--and when she sends Peace Commissioners to him, his officer in Charleston harbor avails himself of their absence to commit hostile acts, and the expostulations of the Commissioners are received in such a manner by the President that they are compelled to give up the mission, and return, as they came to their home.