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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,604 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 760 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 530 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 404 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 382 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 346 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 330 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 312 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 312 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 310 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 18, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) or search for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 6 document sections:

Explosion of a locomotive. --The Knoxville Register gives the following particulars of a sad event which is alluded to by our Lynchburg correspondent: A serious explosion occurred on the East Tennessee and Georgia Railroad on Thursday afternoon, attended with a melancholy loss of life. The engine, "Sam Tate," exploded about two miles West of McDonald's Station, between Cleveland and Chattanooga, killing instantly the engineer, Alexander Moore, and the fireman, Cornelius Cady, and one soldier who was on the engine, besides mortally wounding another soldier. The engineer was one of the most efficient and highly esteemed upon the road, and his melancholy fate has not only carried grief into his own family, but has saddened hosts of friends and acquaintances in this community, who knew and esteemed him. The volunteers upon the train, we learn, behave nobly on the occasion. They not only contributed a handsome sum of money for the support of the family of the lamented engine
and zeal for the Southern cause, had sent nearly all her men away to drive back the ruthless invader from the soil of the Old Dominion. Troops are coming in great numbers, and it is believed that they will welcome those minions of tyranny at the point of the bayonet, and greet them to bloody graves. Our company, the "Liberty Hall Volunteers," composed of the students of Washington College, Lexington, Va., numbering seventy, arrived here yesterday evening, together with a regiment from East Tennessee, with whom we fell in at Gordonsville. The citizens here are very hospitable indeed to the soldiers, which, together with the smiles of approbation that greet them from the daughters of beauty, make it a delightful place for quarters. We laid over in Staunton three nights and two days, and fared much better than soldiers generally do, owing to the kindness of the ladies, whose bright eyes and sweet smiles can gain a victory over our soldiers far easier than the swords of the North.
The Daily Dispatch: June 18, 1861., [Electronic resource], The Howitzers at the Bethel Church fight. (search)
East Tennessee. --The majority against separation in East Tennessee is estimated at from 10,000 to 12,000. We are gratified to learn that there is now a wise determination to acquiesce in the will of the majority, and to resist Lincoln's "irrepressible conflict" of aggression to the last. None who know the sterling character of the people of that section would expect anything less of them in such a crisis as the present.--Memphis Bulletin. East Tennessee. --The majority against separation in East Tennessee is estimated at from 10,000 to 12,000. We are gratified to learn that there is now a wise determination to acquiesce in the will of the majority, and to resist Lincoln's "irrepressible conflict" of aggression to the last. None who know the sterling character of the people of that section would expect anything less of them in such a crisis as the present.--Memphis Bulletin.
e been coming in by the thousand, and have been ordered off as fast as transportation could be procured for them. A portion of the Irish Brigade left here yesterday evening for a post where it is likely they will have a chance at the would-be oppressors of the South at an early day. It is now pretty well ascertained that the change in schedule on the railroads connecting here, referred to in a previous letter, will take place on next Sunday. A shocking casualty occurred on the East Tennessee and Georgia Railroad last Friday morning, by the explosion of the boiler of a locomotive. Some three or four lives lost and several persons injured. The engineer and fireman were among the killed. The rest were soldiers. Neither names or particulars learned. A number of Missourian who were taken prisoners by Lincoln's Hessians have arrived here. A train, consisting of nineteen cars, from Montgomery, Ala., passed through here yesterday, with Government fixtures, appurtenance
Kentucky's submission. The duty, of course, now devolves upon Governor Magoffin, upon ascertaining the full circumstances of the case, to demand of the abolition commandant at Cairo the design of this insulting movement, and to take immediate steps that will effectually prevent its repetition. It is sufficiently well understood in this community that the occupation of Columbus, as a roosting place for the unclean birds now congregated at Cairo, can never be tolerated a single day by Tennessee. If Kentucky's pretended neutrality should be violated by such an attempt, without resistance on the part of her constituted authorities, an immediate dislodgment of them by the soldiery of the Volunteer State may be looked for as a necessary measure in the prosecution of our defence. It will, perhaps, save Governor Magoffin no small deal of trouble and annoyance to turn his attention to this matter now, with the view of preventing other and more embarrassing complications. The foll
Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.the Southwest still Volunteering--Tennessee elections — Andy Johnson, Nelson, Maynard & Co. Gone to the Mountains. Goodson, Va., June 11th, 1861. It may be interesting to your many readers to hear from the Southwest, that loyal portion of the State, which has never proved false to Virginia in her hour of tribulation — We have but one "black sheep" in all the flock — to wit: Sharp, of Lee, delegate to the State Convention; but more of him presentact,) a great mania for the epauletts and sword. Whether it is easier to go as Colonel, with a darkey to wait on one, and high pay, or whether we have more than our portion of stuff to be worked up into Colonels, this deponent sayeth not. Tennessee comes up all right, 70,000 majority for Secession. It is reported that Knoxville proper gives a Secession majority, and the county of Tom Nelson repudiates his union with Lincoln. All hail to the volunteer State! Report says, that Andy Johns<