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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1,604 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 760 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 530 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 404 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 382 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 346 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 330 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 312 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 312 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 310 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 28, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) or search for Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

From Southwestern Virginia. the town of Abingdon — interesting extract of a letter from Bowling Green. Ky.--Disappearance of the Union element of East Tennessee, &c. [special correspondence of the Dispatch.] Camp Robertson, near Abingdon, December 23, 1861. Abingdon, while a most thriving and hospitable town, is devoid of those striking incidents and exciting war rumors which give interest and zest to one's correspondence. Hence the public must put up with the dryness ofay rest assured that we will whip them whenever we meet them, for there is no such word as fail in our lexicon. An old gentleman from Cocke county, Tennessee, with whom I enjoyed a long conversation, informs me that the Union element of East Tennessee has entirely disappeared, and the Government will have no further trouble with the traitors. The proclamation of Lead better has had the effect of crushing out the treason of that fertile and wealthy portion of the State. The recreants are
s made by individuals, our soldiers in the field are not sufficiently supplied with clothing or blankets. And now, under the proclamation of the Executive of 22d November, several thousand additional troops are rapidly enlisting for a march to Tennessee and Kentucky, under a requisition made on the State by General A. S. Johnston. They must be furnished with arms, warm clothing and blankets. They go to a cold and inhospitable climate. Will not every citizen, male and female, contribute to tg and in every way, and, thank God, will ever respond to the calls of their country. To them I appeal for arms and blankets for our gallant troops. We want thousands of guns, and we need ten thousand blankets. Send all you can give and all you can sell, and send without delay. As nearly all the troops now moving for Tennessee and Kentucky are from the mountains and valleys of North Alabama, an appeal to the patriotism of South Alabama for guns and blankets I know will not be in vain.
The Daily Dispatch: December 28, 1861., [Electronic resource], A Union member of the Tennessee Legislature becomes Disgusted with Lincoln. (search)
A Union member of the Tennessee Legislature becomes Disgusted with Lincoln. --John McDowell, a Union member of the Tennessee Legislature, from Andy Johnson's county, made a speech in the Legislature on the 14th, in which he stated that Lincoln's message had driven every vestige of Unionism out of him, and now he came out fully and fairly for the South. He thought the Unionists of East Tennessee were completely absolved from their allegiance to the Yankee Government.
, to pay every officer actually in service under Gen. Fremont, what is justly due him. Miscellaneous. Mr. Hale presented in the United States Senate, on the 24th inst., a petition from citizens of Boston, claiming that the freedom of the press had been infringed. The Federal gun-boat Young Rover, which is stationed at York river, reports an extensive conflagration in Yorktown about a week since. In New York on Tuesday, the 24th inst., Virginia 6's were quoted at 46347½ ; Tennessee 6's 41½a42; North Carolina 6's 58a59½ Missouri 6's 38½a39. There are over 200 English vessels in the Northern ports. They are making rapid preparations to hasten home. A rumor prevailed North that Mason and Slidell were to leave in the Europa, from Boston, on Wednesday. Gen. T. W. Sherman has returned to his command in Missouri, having been pronounces not insane. John M. Brewer, one of the Fort Warren prisoners from Baltimore, has taken the oath and been discharged.