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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,030 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 578 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 482 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 198 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 152 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 116 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 96 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 96 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 94 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 92 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Texas (Texas, United States) or search for Texas (Texas, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 47 results in 11 document sections:

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 2: civil and military operations in Missouri. (search)
e 13th, July, 1861. who took the chief command. It was a fortunate movement for Sigel; for within twelve hours after the battle, Jackson was re-enforced by Generals Price and Ben McCulloch, who came with several thousand Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas troops. General Lyon had left Booneville in pursuit of the fugitive Confederates on the 3d of July, with a little army numbering about twenty-seven hundred men, with four pieces of artillery and a long baggage-train. The day was intensely hotfusion the Confederates rushed forward, killed the artillery horses, and, turning the flanks of the infantry, caused them to fly in the wildest disorder. They rushed into bushes and by-roads, incessantly attacked by large numbers of Arkansas and Texas cavalry. The entire battery was captured; and, in the course of a few minutes, of his twelve hundred men, Sigel had only about three hundred left. He saved these and one of his cannon, Captain Flagg fastened ropes to this gun, and made some
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 7: military operations in Missouri, New Mexico, and Eastern Kentucky--capture of Fort Henry. (search)
n in the remote region of New Mexico, in the shape of invaders from Texas. Like Halleck and Hunter, he attacked the monster quickly and manfully. We have seen the loyal people of Texas bound hand and foot by a civil and military despotism after the treason of General Twiggs. exico to the intended Confederacy, and to aid Twiggs in giving over Texas to the rule of the Confederates. So early as 1860, Secretary Floyd the officers under them, and to induce them to lead their men into Texas and give them to the service of the rebellion. One of these officeer his control toward the village of Mesilla, he fell in with a few Texas insurgents, and, after a slight skirmish, fled back to the fort. Hrd and charged furiously upon the batteries of McRea and Hall. The Texas cavalry, under Major Raguet, charged upon Hall's battery, and were forgotten by the Confederate Government in the final settlement. in Texas, May 4. a wiser if not a happier man. Canby did not follow him ove
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 8: the siege and capture of Fort Donelson. (search)
regnable. And within these intrenchments, when Grant appeared before them to make an assault, were more than twenty thousand effective men. These consisted of thirteen regiments of Tennessee troops, two of Kentucky, six of Mississippi, one of Texas, two of Alabama, four of Virginia, two independent battalions of Tennessee infantry, and a regiment of cavalry, under the afterward famous leader Colonel A. B. Forest. With these were artillerymen for manning six batteries of light cannon, and selonged to him. regiments, that performed such signal service, were drilled. It was converted into a prison, and early in April, 1862, after the battle of Shiloh, it contained full 8,000 captives, most of whom were from Alabama, Mississippi, and Texas. The passage of these prisoners through the country to their destinatiog produced a profound sensation. A St. Louis journal mentioned al e arrival there of ten thousand of them, on ten steamers. Prison at camp Chase, Columbus, Ohio. A l
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 9: events at Nashville, Columbus, New Madrid, Island number10, and Pea Ridge. (search)
General Price, meanwhile, had been joined by Ben McCulloch, with Texas, Louisiana, and Arkansas troops, and his force had become fully equs, about twenty-five thousand a strong. Arkansas, Louisiana, and Texas troops under McCulloch, 18,000 Choctaw, Cherokee, Chickasaw, and otd sent forth a characteristic address to the young men of Arkansas, Texas, and Northern Louisiana. We have voted to be free, he said. We muars flaunt in the breeze over the bright battalions of Arkansas, of Texas, and of Louisiana, as they are marshaling to do battle with Missoury your hearth when the rude blast of war is sounding in your ears! Texas chivalry, to arms I Hardships and hunger, disease and death are pred and half-civilized Indians in the regions bordering on Kansas and Texas, and how in August, 1861, the Cherokees tendered their support to t would adhere, on penalty of having their country ravaged by 20,000 Texas and Arkansas troops. This produced the council at Tahlequah on the
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 12: operations on the coasts of the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. (search)
not long before his six thousand troops and more were ready for the field. The Government had then turned its attention to the posts on the Gulf of Mexico and its tributary waters, and the seizure of Mobile and New Orleans, and the occupation of Texas, formed parts of its capital plan of operations in that region. Butler was called upon to suggest the best rendezvous for an expedition against Mobile. He named Ship Island, off the coast of Mississippi, between Mobile Bay and Lake Borgne (a louary 1862. he received minute orders from General McClellan to co-operate with the navy, first in the capture of New Orleans and its approaches, and then in the reduction of Mobile, Galveston, and Baton Rouge, with the ultimate view of occupying Texas. To his New England troops were added three regiments, then at Baltimore, and orders were given for two others at Key West and one at Fort Pickens to join the expedition. On paper, the whole force was about eighteen thousand, but when they were
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 17: Pope's campaign in Virginia. (search)
arrow. Mississippi--*Albert G. Brown, James Phelan. Missouri--*John B. Clark, R. S. T. Peyton. North Carolina--George Davis, William T. Dortch. South Carolina--*Robert W. Barnwell, *James L. Orr. Tennessee--Langdon C. Haynes, Gustavus A. Henry. Texas--William S. Oldham, *Louis T. Wigfall. Virginia--*R. M. T. Hunter, *Wm. Ballard Preston. House of Representatives. Alabama--Thomas J. Foster, *William E. Smith, John P. Ralls, *J. L. M. Curry, *Francis S. Lyon, Wm. P. Chilton, *David Clopto. Bonham, James Farrow, *William W. Boyce. Tennessee--Joseph T. Heiskell, William G. Swan, W. H. Tebbs, E. L. Gardenshire, *Henry S. Foote, *Meredith P. Gentry, *George W. Jones, Thomas Meneese, *J. D. C. Atkins, *John V. Wright, David M. Currin. Texas--*John a Wilcox, *C. C. Herbert, Peter W. Gray, B. F. Sexton, M. D. Graham, Wm. B. Wright. Virginia--*M. R. H. Garnett, John R. Chambliss, James Lyons, *Roger A. Pryor, *Thomas S. Bococke, John Goode, Jr., J. P. Holcombe, *D. C. De Jarnett, *Will
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 19: events in Kentucky and Northern Mississippi. (search)
former, was preparing the way for a more formidable invasion. On the morning of the 13th of July he suddenly appeared before Murfreesboroa, below Nashville, with about three thousand men, Forrest's force was composed of one regiment each from Texas, Alabama, and Tennessee, and two from Georgia. and attacked the smaller National force there under General T. L. Crittenden, and Colonel W. W. Duffield of the Ninth Michigan. The National force was composed of portions of the Ninth Michigan anearfully with grape and canister. Steadily those lines moved on and reached the ditch, where they paused for a moment — a fatal moment — before making the contemplated charge. Then Colonel Rogers, a brave acting-brigadier Confederate flag. of Texas, with the new Confederate flag by a recent act of the Congress at Richmond the design of the Confederate flag had been changed. Instead of the Stars and bars first adopted (see page 256, volume I.), it was a white flag, with the Union represe
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 20: events West of the Mississippi and in Middle Tennessee. (search)
ie Grove, 535. sufferings of Loyalists in Western Texas, 536. massacre of Unionists, 537. the Ar. Hovey, was attacked by about fifteen hundred Texas cavalry, led by General Albert Rust. Hovey harn Missouri, and a large number of troops from Texas. Their entire number was estimated to be fiftf its distressing aspect still farther west in Texas, the extreme southwestern State of the Republi from the cruelties of the insurgents. In Western Texas, where there were few slave-holders, and ceverses of the Confederates in Tennessee, when Texas was placed under martial law, and a merciless Germans belonging to the best families in Western Texas, to leave the country. They collected at e Republic gave protection to the loyalists of Texas, three years later, measures were taken to colhad been made to repossess important points in Texas, especially the city of Galveston. So early ar; and so matters remained until Monument of Texas Martyrs the 8th of October following, when Ga
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 21: slavery and Emancipation.--affairs in the Southwest. (search)
s the States and parts of States wherein the people thereof, respectively, are this day in rebellion against the United States, the following, to wit: Arkansas, Texas, Louisiana (except the parishes of St. Bernard, Plaquemines, Jefferson, St. John, St. Charles, St. James, Ascension, Assumption, Terre Bonne, Lafourche, Ste. Marie The votes were as follows:--Alabama, 11; Arkansas, 6; Florida, 4; Georgia, 12; Louisiana, 8; Mississippi 9; North Carolina, 12; South Carolina, 8; Tennessee, 13; Texas, 8; Virginia, 18. Three days afterward Feb. 22, 1862. he was inaugurated President for six years. He chose for his Cabinet Judah P. Benjamin, of Louisiana, as Sec the establishment of which they attempted to destroy the Republic. alone could the vast supplies of the grain and cattle growing regions of Western Louisiana and Texas be passed safely over the great River to Confederate armies, which, with those of the Nationals, were exhausting the regions eastward, between it and the mountain
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 22: the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
the expedition sailed it was generally believed that Texas was its destination. General Andrew J. Hamilton, the newly appointed Provisional Governor of Texas, was in New Orleans, anxiously awaiting its arrival, with that expectation; and the loyal people of Texas were stretching forth their hands toward the Government in piteous p the speedy restoration of the National authority in Texas. The task before him, as we shall observe, was much than was anticipated, and for a long time afterward Texas remained bound in chains. Even the important positi quiet. General John B. McGruder had been sent to Texas from Virginia, and was then in chief command in thatTennessee, and was a representative in Congress from Texas from 1851 to 1858. Resistance would have been vain, ing the siege of Vicksburg in earnest, not a rood of Texas soil was repossessed by the National authority. G slowly to Alexandria, and, if pressed, to retire to Texas. An intercepted letter showed that on the day befor
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