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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 416 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 114 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 80 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 46 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 38 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 38 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 34 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 28 0 Browse Search
James Parton, The life of Horace Greeley 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Vermont (Vermont, United States) or search for Vermont (Vermont, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 5 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 4: editorial Experiments.—1826-1828. (search)
diminutive in person, replied, with kindling eye, Yes, but think of the magnitude of his theme! the majesty of his cause! (Lib., 10.193.) Instead of being able to withstand the tide of public Journal of the Times, Dec. 12, 1828. opinion, he wrote, a few months later, in describing Lundy, it would at first seem doubtful whether he could sustain a temporary conflict with the winds of heaven. And yet he has explored nineteen of the twenty-four States—from the Green Mountains of Vermont to the banks of the Mississippi—multiplied anti-slavery societies in every quarter, put every petition in motion relative to the extinction of slavery in the District of Columbia, everywhere awakened the slumbering sympathies of the people, and begun a work, the completion of which will be the salvation of his country. His heart is of a gigantic size. Every inch of him is alive with power. He combines the meekness of Howard with the boldness of Luther. No reformer was ever more devoted,
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 5: Bennington and the Journal of the Times1828-29. (search)
actically gone over to the Jackson party. As Vermont was strongly for Adams, and as Bennington, thed the formation of anti-slavery societies in Vermont, and spoke of the importance of petitioning Con of the subscribers, inhabitants of the State of Vermont, humbly suggests to your honorable bodiesa petition bearing 2352 names as the voice of Vermont in favor of freedom,—probably the most numeroideration of the question, and Mr. Mallary of Vermont, who alone among the New England members oppoand most interesting newspaper ever issued in Vermont. One column was always devoted to the subjecs adopted State, and to regard his removal to Vermont as a wise and fortunate step. For moral worth would have done credit to a native: Our Vermont climate against the world for a better! . . .n by John S. Robinson, who became Governor of Vermont in 1853,—the only Democratic Governor the Stahad been in the city but a fortnight, from my Vermont residence, when the notification came; and, a
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 8: the Liberator1831. (search)
hes upon the South, and asserting that the crime of oppression is not national, whereas the power of Congress over the District is indisputable, —this petition prays that Congress will, without delay, take such measures for the immediate or gradual abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia, and for preventing the bringing of slaves into that District for purposes of traffic, in such mode as may be advisable, etc. This is an advance on the petition which Mr. Garrison had circulated in Vermont, in so far as it assumes Ante, p. 108. the practicability of immediate emancipation; and it may be said for the author of it (not the editor himself) that the appeal is not here to individuals guilty of the sin of slaveholding, but to a legislature which must consider ways and means, and which is accordingly also asked to make suitable provision . . . for the education of all free blacks and colored children in the District, thus to preserve them from continuing, even as free men, an une
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
e's none so poor would do them reverence. Even in this city it was with the utmost difficulty they could find a place in which to exhibit those young humbugs, the two African princes, and their emancipation scheme, which is the greatest humbug of all! They could get into no churches but the Methodist—not even into Park Street! Now let them ask, with a sneer, What have abolitionists done? The Rev. Orson S. Murray writes to Mr. Garrison (Ms. Oct. 11, 1834) of Congregational clergymen in Vermont who would no longer take up collections for the Colonization Society. This unfriendly reception of the colonizationists, however, was a sacrifice of real to outward logic. The people of Boston should know no difference between immediate abolition and Colonization, if they are calculated to destroy the harmony which should subsist between the North and the South (Commercial Gazette, in Lib. 4.123. Cf. ante, pp. 303, 304.) The abolitionists had equally been obliged to give up a public c
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 14: the Boston mob (first stage).—1835. (search)
in its organization, corrupt in its origin, deceitful in its object, and delusive in its action; a wretched imposition, doomed to come to naught; a soulless organization with a sounding title. Its chief promoters were Joseph Tracy, formerly of Vermont, and Leonard Bacon, colonizationists like the majority of their associates, and therefore incapacitated from winning the confidence of the colored population whom they proposed to relieve. Their constitution would not prevent cooperation with tompromises of 1789, the solemn obligation of the Constitutional compact, and the necessity of depriving the South of a pretext for disunion, furnished the staple of the bill of fare upon which Richard Fletcher, An eminent lawyer, a native of Vermont, who came to Boston in 1825. He did not long remain in the ranks of repression. In 1838 he was ready to have Congress abolish slavery in the District and the inter-State slave trade, and to exclude new slave States from the Union (Lib. 8.179).