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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 86 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 55 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 44 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 26 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 16 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 14 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 8 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir. You can also browse the collection for Brussels (Belgium) or search for Brussels (Belgium) in all documents.

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im from the King inquiring when he would arrive at Brussels, and the royal railway carriage was placed at his General and Mrs. Grant, to dinner at the palace of Brussels, Sunday, 8th July, 1877, at 6 1/2 o'clock. Frocand his wife, and to all the American officials in Brussels, down to the vice-consul, who was an Englishman, a His Majesty knew that General Grant was to leave Brussels the next day, and accordingly proposed that the ex Minister to this very Court, and had even visited Brussels with my credentials, prepared, if I chose, to presat London rather than take the post of Minister to Brussels. I went in to dinner lower down in the line, but e core of the world instead of on the outside; for Brussels and Belgium exist only by permission of the greatethan that which surrounds imperial potentates. At Brussels there seemed a happy mingling of that regard for fter regal parade. A fortnight after the dinner in Brussels General Grant arrived in Berne. It was understood
So, too, on Lake Luzerne, though he was never indifferent to mountains, the railroad on the Righi interested him far more than the famous scenery, and he examined the highway of the Axenstrasse more carefully than the chapel of William Tell. At Cadenabbia he refused to visit the Villa Carlotta to see the marbles of Canova and Thorwaldsen, and at Berne he was vexed with his son, Jesse, and with me, because we insisted on viewing the Cathedral. He said we had seen Cologne and Mayence and Brussels, why should we waste our time on any more architecture. He was indeed a little unreasonable at first, as a traveler. If he could not discern the beauties of a cathedral or a gallery, he would not believe that others did. But later he became more catholic; he found out that there might be things in heaven and earth he had not dreamed of in his earlier philosophy. In that same Berne he made me walk for hours with him, turning away from the Cathedral and the Bernese Oberland, to stray til
d I should have answered it before you got away. What I wanted particularly to say—and now do say — is that I will not regard your declination of the Mission to Brussels for the present. I presume Jones will not return to Brussels, though under the letter which he received when his resignation was tendered he can do so. His housBrussels, though under the letter which he received when his resignation was tendered he can do so. His household goods, &c., were sent home in advance. If he does not return the mission will still be tendered to you,—and I hope you with Mrs. Badeau, may enjoy it. Of course I can not know, or even surmise, why you did not wish . . . . But this will all be right very soon and I know you will then prefer a Mission to a Consulate. I am the City of London presented him with its freedom. Early in July he visited Belgium, and afterward passed up the Rhine to Switzerland and Northern Italy. At Brussels, Frankfort, Cologne, Geneva, and Berne he was the object of public or official courtesies. The Grand Duke of Baden invited him to his villa near Constance, and <