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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 44: retreat to Fisher's Hill. (search)
brigades, to wit: Imboden's, McCausland's, Johnson's, Jackson's and Vaughan's. Vaughan's had now been ordered to Southwestern Virginia, most of the men having left without permission. The surprise and rout of McCausland's and Johnson's brigades byere was already a division there commanded by Averill, besides some detachments which belonged to the Department of West Virginia. A book containing the official reports of the chief surgeon of the cavalry corps of Sheridan's army which was subseque, at 10,000. His infantry consisted of the 6th, 19th, and Crook's corps, the latter being composed of the Army of west Virginia, and one division of the 8th corps. The report of Secretary Stanton shows that there was in the department of which the following available force present for duty May 1st, 1864, to wit: Department of Washington42,124 Department of West Virginia30,782 Department of the Susquehanna2,970 Middle Department 5,627 making an aggregate of 81,503; but, as the Federal S
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 46: affair at Fisher's Hill. (search)
everal weak points. To have retired beyond this point would have rendered it necessary for me to fall back to some of the gaps of the Blue Ridge, at the upper part of the Valley, and I determined therefore to make a show of a stand here, with the hopes that the enemy would be deterred from attacking me in this position, as had been the case in August. On the second day after our arrival at this place, General Breckenridge received orders from Richmond, by telegraph, to return to Southwestern Virginia, and I lost the benefit of his services. He had ably co-operated with me, and our personal relations had been of the most pleasant character. In the afternoon of the 20th, Sheridan's forces appeared on the banks of Cedar Creek, about four miles from Fisher's Hill, and the 21st, and the greater part of the 22nd, were consumed by him in reconnoitring and gradually moving his forces to my front under cover of breastworks. After some sharp skirmishing, he attained a strong positio
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 49: close of the Valley campaign. (search)
dy of my troops remained in their camp for the rest of the month without disturbance, but on the 26th of October the enemy's cavalry attacked Lomax at Millford and after sharp fighting was repulsed. Having heard that Sheridan was preparing to send troops to Grant, and that the Manassas Gap Railroad was being repaired, I moved down the Valley again on the 10th of November. I had received no reinforcements except about 250 cavalry under General Cosby from Breckenridge's department in Southwestern Virginia, some returned convalescents and several hundred conscripts who had been on details which had been revoked. On the 11th, on our approach to Cedar Creek, it was found that the enemy had fallen back towards Winchester, after having fortified and occupied a position on Hupp's Hill subsequently to the battle of Cedar Creek. Colonel Payne drove a small body of cavalry through Middletown to Newtown and I followed him and took position south of the latter place and in view of it. Sherid
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 50: operations in 1865. (search)
horses of Lieutenant Colonel King's artillery were sent to Southwestern Virginia to be wintered, and most of the horses of the other battaliols' brigade of Wharton's division was subsequently sent to Southwestern Virginia to report to General Echols for special duty, and McNeil's by General Lee, extending my command over the Department of Southwestern Virginia and East Tennessee, previously commanded by General Breckend, and an order was sent by telegraph to General Echols, in Southwestern Virginia, to send his brigade by rail to Lynchburg. My own headquarg that Thomas was moving in East Tennessee, and threatening Southwestern Virginia with a heavy force, and I immediately went, by train, to Wye I went with General Echols to Bristol, on the state line between Virginia and Tennessee, and it was ascertained, beyond doubt, that some imp from General Lee, directing me to turn over the command in Southwestern Virginia to General Echols, and in the Valley to General Lomax, and
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Conclusion. (search)
he lungs, and prostrate me for several days in a very dangerous condition. While I was in this situation, a heavy cavalry force under Stoneman, from Thomas' army in Tennessee, moved through North Carolina to the east, and a part of it came into Virginia from the main column, and struck the Virginia & Tennessee Railroad at New River east of Wytheville; whence, after destroying the bridge, it moved east, cutting off all communication with Richmond, and then crossed over into North Carolina. As sith the hope of at least meeting an honorable death while fighting under the flag of my country. Before I reached that Department, Smith's army had also been surrendered, and, without giving a parole, after a long, weary and dangerous ride from Virginia, through the states of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Texas, I finally succeeded in leaving the country. Letter from General Lee. Hdqrs., C. S. Armies, 30th March, 1865. Lt.-General J. A. Early, F
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Appendix: the testimony of letters. (search)
ent to my recollections. I desire, if not prevented, to write a history of the campaigns in Virginia; all of my records, books, orders, etc., were destroyed in the conflagration and retreat from Rnd defeated Hunter at Lynchburg with an army of 20,000 men. You pursued him, driving him out of Virginia into Kanawha Valley, thus diverting him from the valley of Virginia. He had (I think) two brigVirginia. He had (I think) two brigades of cavalry,--you did not have over 1,500 cavalry. (2nd) You made a forced march down the valley, whipping another army of 12,000 men at Monocacy, after driving all the Federal forces out of tlarge force from the front of Lee, for the protection of the city. (3rd) You fell back into Virginia, when your force reduced by fighting and marching could not have exceeded 9,000 men. Sheridan wy a matter of inestimable value, for the merit of truth and knowledge. I refer to a history of Virginia. You have given the subject more accurate study than anybody else. Write it out and publish i
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
221 Department of the Gulf, 418 Department of Northern Virginia, 51 Department of Southwestern Virginia and Eastern Tennessee, 461 Department of Susquehanna, 417, 418, 419 Department of 83- 384, 414 North River, 331, 366, 368, 435, 462 Northern Central R. R., 255, 258 Northwestern Virginia, 191, 368 Ny River, 354, 357-58 Occoquon River, 3, 4, 5, 10, 47 Ohio River, 368, 324-228, 230, 232- 234, 239, 242-43, 247-48-49, 253, 259, 267-272, 273, 275 Smith, Governor of Virginia, 306 Smithfield, 383, 408, 410, 414 Smithtown, 254 Smythe County, 466 Snicker's F, 263, 280-81, 367, 385, 392-93-94 South River, 366, 433, 434 Southside R. R., 465 Southwestern Virginia, 331, 378, 381, 397, 416, 429, 453, 466, 469 Sperryville, 238, 285 Spottsylvania, 12, 13, 15, 31, 50 University of Virginia, 474 Upper Valley, 369 Valley District, 51 Valley of Virginia, 285, 326-27, 333, 366, 370-71, 380-83, 391, 393-94, 396, 398, 401, 413-17, 424, 429, 435-37, 4
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