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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 370 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 46 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 46 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 30 0 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 22 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 22 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) or search for Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) in all documents.

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ber, 1807, reported briefly against the petition, closing as follows: Your Committee, after duly considering the matter, respectfully submit the following resolution: Resolved, That it is not expedient at this time to suspend the sixth article of compact for the government of the Territory of the United States North-West of the river Ohio. And here the long and fruitless struggle to fasten Slavery upon the vast Territory now forming the States of Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin, appears to have ended. By this time, emigration from the Free States into that Territory had begun. But it is probable that, at any time prior to 1818-20, a majority of the white settlers actually resident in that Territory would have voted in favor of the introduction of slaves. For a counter-revolution had been silently proceeding for some years previous, and had almost eradicated the lessons and the principles of the Revolution from the hearts of the South, saving, of course, tho
of the annexed country between slaveholding and non-slaveholding States. VI. The assent of Mexico to be obtained by treaty to such annexation and boundary, or to be dispensed with when the Congress of the United States may deem such assent to be unnecessary. VII. Other details of the annexation to be adjusted by treaty, so far as the same may come within the scope of the treaty-making power. This was rejected by 11 Yeas — all Whigs from Free States--to 33 Nays. Mr. Walker,of Wisconsin, moved to add to the House proposition an alternative contemplating negotiation as a means of effecting the end proposed: and this was carried by 27 Yeas, to 25 Nays — the Nays all Whigs. The measure, as thus amended, passed the Senate by Yeas 27--all the Democrats present and three Whigs, of whom two thereupon turned Democrats — to 25 Nays — all Whigs; On the final vote in the Senate, the Yeas--for the Proposition as amended — were as follows — the names in italics being those of
ing 137 Electors. Mr. Van Buren carried no Electors, but received a respectable support in every Free State, Rhode Island and New Jersey excepted. New York, Massachusetts, and Vermont, each gave a larger popular vote to him than to Gen. Cass; Wisconsin gave him nearly as many as Gen. Taylor. The entire popular vote (South Carolina not casting any) stood — Taylor and Fillmore, 1,360,752; Cass and Butler, 1,219,962; Van Buren and Adams, 291,342. Gen. Taylor had a majority of the Electoral and t constrained to call an extra session of Congress — always a portent of evil to the party in power. Accordingly, the great Appropriation bill having passed the House, and been reported to and several days debated in the Senate, Mr. Walker, of Wisconsin, moved to add a section extending the laws of the United States over the territory west of the Rio del Norte, acquired from Mexico by the treaty of February 22, 1848, and authorizing the President to prescribe and establish all proper and needf
otes at the South than would have been given for Mr. Webster, or even Mr. Clay. In the Free States, very many Northern Whigs Among those Whigs who took this course in New York City, the names of Willis Hall, Joseph L. White, Philip W. Engs, and Wilson G. Hunt, are conspicuous. had refused to support him, and given their votes to Van Buren as an open, unequivocal champion of Slavery Restriction; and it was by the votes thus diverted from Gen. Taylor that Ohio, with perhaps Indiana and Wisconsin also, were given to Gen. Cass. The great body of the Northern Whigs, however, had supported the nominees of their party, not fully satisfied with Gen. Taylor's position on the Slavery question, but trusting that the influence necessarily exerted over his Administration by the desires and convictions of the far greater number of its supporters, whether in or out of Congress, led by such determined Slavery Restrictionists as Mr. Webster and Gov. Seward, would insure his political adhesion t
etts; Foot, of Vermont; Smith, of Connecticut; Fish and Seward, of New York; Chase and Wade, of Ohio; Dodge (Henry), of Wisconsin--10. Nays — Norris and Williams, of New Hampshire; Toucey, of Connecticut; Brodhead, of Pennsylvania; Clayton, of Decasion. of Michigan; Pettit, of Indiana; Douglas and Shields, of Illinois; Dodge (A. C.) and Jones, of Iowa; Walker, of Wisconsin; Hunter and Mason, of Virginia; Pratt, of Maryland; Badger, of North Carolina; Butler and Evans, of South Carolina; Daw March 3d.--or rather, morning — passed: Yeas 37; Nays Messrs. Bell, of Tennessee, Houston, of Texas, and Walker, of Wisconsin, who had voted against Mr. Chase's amendment above cited, and Mr. James, of Rhode Island, who had not voted on it at altainty, the Republicans carried New York by a plurality of 80,000, with the six New England States, and Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Iowa--giving Gen. Fremont 114 electoral votes. Mr. Buchanan carried Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Indiana, Illinois,
d but 2,151, where Fremont had received 7,784; and Gov. Randall was chosen in Wisconsin by barely 118, where Fremont had received 13,247. No Republican State was acect an anti-Lecompton Democrat in another district; while Michigan, Iowa, and Wisconsin, chose Republican tickets — as of late had been usual with them — by respectaept into the House delegations from New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Minnesota, decidedly hostile to the Administration; and these, witOhio, Trumbull, of Illinois, Brigham and Chandler, of Michigan, Doolittle, of Wisconsin, Grimes and Harlan, of Iowa--21.--every Democratic Senator present but Mr. Pu Tennessee, 1; Kentucky, 3; Ohio, 23; Indiana, 13; Illinois, 11 ; Michigan, ; Wisconsin, 5; Iowa, 4; Minnesota, 2 1/2; California, 4--198. The question was next nessee, 1; Kentucky, 2 1/2; Ohio, 23; Indiana, 13; Illinois, 11; Michigan, 6; Wisconsin, 5; Iowa, 4; Minnesota, 4--165. Nays--Massachusetts, 6; New Jersey, 2; Pen
Fusion vote apportioned according to the estimated strength of the several contributing parties.2,801 Pennsylvania 268,030 Fusion vote apportioned according to the estimated strength of the several contributing parties.78,871 Fusion vote apportioned according to the estimated strength of the several contributing parties.100,000 12,776 Ohio 231,610 187,232 11,405 12,194 Indiana 139,033 115,509 12,295 5,306 Illinois 172,161 160,215 2,404 4,913 Michigan 88,480 65,057 805 405 Wisconsin 86,110 65,021 888 161 Minnesota 22,069 11,920 748 62 Iowa 70,409 55,111 1,048 1,748 California 39,173 38,516 34,334 6,817 Oregon 5,270 3,951 5,006 183   Total Free States 1,831,180 1,128,049 279,211 130,151 Slave states. States. Lincoln. Douglas. Breckinridge. Bell. Delaware 3,815 1,023 7,337 3,864 Maryland 2,294 5,966 42,482 41,760 Virginia 1,929 16,290 74,323 74,681 North Carolina (no ticket) 2,701 48,539 44,990 South Carolina [Chosen by the Legislature.] Georgia (no
airing or defeating the operation of the Fugitive Slave law should thereupon be deprived of her right of representation in Congress. Mr. Charles H. Larrabee, of Wisconsin, proposed a Convention of the States. All these projects were referred to the Grand Select Committee aforesaid. That Committee, December 13th, after four day, or out of territory acquired north of said States, shall constitute one section, to be known as the North. The States of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and Kansas, and all new States annexed or admitted into the Union, or erected within the jurisdiction of any of said States, or by the junctionis Committee, made an elaborate report, on the 14th of January, 1861, favoring concession and compromise, but not the line of 36° 30′ Messrs. C. C. Washburne, of Wisconsin, and Mason W. Tappan, of N. H., tendered a minority report, setting forth that, in view of the Rebellion, now in progress, no concessions should be made. They c
antry or riflemen only — each regiment to be composed of 780 men — the apportionment of regiments to the several States called on being as follows: Maine 1 New Hampshire 1 Vermont 1 Massachusetts 2 Rhode Island 1 Connecticut 1 New York 17 New Jersey 4 Pennsylvania 16 Delaware 1 Tennessee 2 Maryland 4 Virginia 3 North Carolina 2 Kentucky 4 Arkansas 1 Missouri 4 Ohio 13 Indiana 6 Illinois 6 Michigan 1 Iowa 1 Minnesota 1 Wisconsin 1 The 94 regiments thus called for would form a total of 73,391 men — the residue of the 75,000 being expected from the Federal District. I appeal to all loyal citizens to favor, facilitate, and aid, this effort to maintain the honor, the integrity, and existence, of our national Union, and the perpetuity of popular Government, and to redress wrongs already long enough endured. I deem it proper to say that the first service assigned to the forces hereby called forth will probably be<
paired; and, as soon as these objects are accomplished, the war ought to cease. Mr. Stevens, of Pa., objecting, The resolution could not be considered forthwith; but it was taken up on Monday, and, on motion of Mr. Burnett, of Ky., divided — the vote being first taken on so much of the resolution as precedes and includes the word capital, which was adopted by. Yeas 121; Nays--Messrs. Burnett and Reid--(Rebels:) when the remainder was likewise adopted: Yeas 117; Nays--Messrs. Potter, of Wis., and Riddle, of Ohio--(Republicans.) Mr. Burnett declined to vote. It is worthy of record that on this sad day, while Washington, crowded with fugitives from the routed Union Grand Army, seemed to he at the mercy of the Rebels, Congress legislated calmly and patiently throughout; and the House, on motion of Mr. Vandever, of Iowa, unanimously Resolved, That the maintenance of the Constitution, the preservation of the Union, and the enforcement of the laws, are sacred trusts which must b
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