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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 370 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 46 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 46 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 30 0 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 22 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 22 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) or search for Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) in all documents.

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rnors Morgan and Olden; while Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, also gave Opposition majorities; and Michigan, Wisconsin, and most other Western States, showed a decided falling off in Administration strength. The general result of those e3<*>,033 133,110 118,517 128,160 Illinois 172,161 169,215 120,116 136,662 Michigan 88,480 66,267 68,716 62,102 Wisconsin 86,11<*> 66,070 66,801 67,985 Iowa 70,409 57,922 Soldiers' vote: Admn., 14,874; Opp., 4,115. Wisconsin Soldiers'Wisconsin Soldiers' Vote: Admn., 8,373; Opp., 2,046. No other States had yet authorized their soldiers in the field to vote.66,014 50,898 Minnesota 22,069 12,668 15,754 11,442   10 States 1,498,872 1,290,806 1,192,896 1,228,677 1860--Lincoln's maj--20rsey 2 3 1 4 Pennsylvania 18 7 12 12 Ohio 13 8 5 14 Indiana 7 4 4 7 Illinois 4 5 5 9 Michigan 4 0 5 1 Wisconsin 3 0 3 3 Iowa 2 0 6 0 Minnesota 2 0 2 0   Total, 10 States 78 37 57 67 1860--Lincoln maj.--41. 1862--
dential election of 1848. A similar treaty was now negotiated between the United States and Great Britain; and a bill designed to give effect to its provisions was reported June 12, 1862. to the Senate by Mr. Sumner, considered, and passed: June 16. Yeas 34; Nays 4. The House concurred; July 7. and the bill became a law. July 11. The first proposition looking to a repeal of the Fugitive Slave act of 1850 by the XXXVIIth Congress was made Dec. 26, 1861. by Mr. Howe, of Wisconsin, to the Senate; whereby it was read twice, referred to the Judiciary Committee, and reported Feb. 11, 1862. against by Mr. Ten Eyck, of New Jersey. That report killed it. But Mr. Wilmot, of Pa., soon revived May 23. the proposition, by a bill which required every person, who should apply for the legal process required for the arrest of a fugitive slave, to take a stringent oath of loyalty. The bill further provided that each alleged fugitive shall have compulsory process against wi
works mounted with serviceable guns, with the main approaches well covered by abatis. The gunboat Tyler, Lt.-Com'g J. M. Pritchett, was on hand, and played a very efficient part in the defense. And, though Helena lies on a flat adjoining the river, its outworks had been judiciously located on the bluffs a mile back, where deep ravines and steep ridges favor the defensive and impede the bringing up of artillery by their assailants. Brig.-Gen. F. Salomon, Brother of the then Governor of Wisconsin. who had in good part planned and constructed them, was in immediate command of our exterior defenses. Holmes — who had been grossly deceived both as to the strength of our works and the number of their defenders — had never a reasonable chance of success. His only ground of rational hope was that he might be confronted by a coward, a traitor, or an idiot; and that did not happen to be the case. Two years of sanguinary conflict had begun to tell on the resources of the Confederates.
ll these were plainly sympathetic with and subordinate to the New York effort, and quickly subsided when that was overborne. So there was, at different periods of the War, forcible resistance offered to conscription in two or three counties of Wisconsin, perhaps a few more of Pennsylvania, and possibly two or three other localities. But in no single instance was there a riot incited by drafting, wherein Americans by birth bore any considerable part, nor in which the great body of the actors wy that cast at the same election for Judge of the Supreme Court, which was as follows:   Home. Soldiers'. Total. Dillon (Repub.) 68,306 17,435 85,741 Mason (Dem.) 50,829 2,289 53,068   Repub. majority, 17,477 15,046 32,673 Wisconsin likewise — not voting till late Nov. 3.--rolled up a very heavy majority Total vote for Governor: James T. Lewis (Repub.), 79,959; Palmer (Dem.), 55,248. on every ticket, though she had been very evenly divided in 1862, and had only been
189,487158,349 Missouri72,99131,026 Michigan85,35267,370 Iowa87,33149,260 Wisconsin79,56463,875 Minnesota25,06017,375 California62,13443,841 Oregon9,8888,457 21 Kentucky1,1942,823 Ohio41,1469,757 Michigan9,4022,959 Iowa15,1781,364 Wisconsin11,3722,458 Kansas2,867543 California2,600237   Total119,75434,291 Lincol Pennsylvania1212159 Rhode Island2--2-- Vermont3--3-- West Virginia3--3-- Wisconsin3351 Nevada (new)----1--   Total1067714341 note.--Some members ultimatBrown. Henderson. Michigan--Chandler, Howard. Iowa — Grimes, Harlan. Wisconsin--Doolittle, Howe. Minnesota--Ramsey, Wilkinson. Kansas--J. H. Lane, Pom Upson. Iowa — Allison, Grinnell, A. W. Hubbard, Kasson, Price, Wilson. Wisconsin--Cobb, McIndoe, Sloan, Wheeler. Minnesota--Donnelly, Windom. Kansas--Wi W. J. Allen, Eden, C. M. Harris, Knapp, Morrison, Robinson, Ross, Stuart. Wisconsin--J. S. Brown, Eldridge. Missouri--Hall, Scott.--Total, 56. Not Voting--<
ception of, 237; Gens. McDowell and McClellan on, 237-8; Gen. Butler declares slaves contraband of war, 238; Gen. Cameron, Gen. Fremont, and President Lincoln on. 238-40; Gen. T. W. Sherman's assurance, 240; Gen. Wool's contraband order, 240; Gens. Dix and Halleck on. 241; Cameron and Lincoln on, 24:1,; Seward on, 243-4; Gen. Burnside's Roanoke Island proclamation, 244; Gens. McCook, Buell, and Doubleday on slave-hunting, 244-6; Gen. Thomas Williams expels all fugitives, 246; Col. Paine of Wisconsin thereon, 246; Lt.-Col. D. R. Anthony thereon, 246; Gen. Hunter's order on, annulled by the President, 246-7; Gen. McClellan on, 248-9; Mr. Greeley's letter to the President, and the response, 249; Mr. Lincoln to the Emancipationists, 251; his Proclamation of Freedom, 253-5; Emancipation in Congress, 256; army slave-catching prohibited, 257-8; Slavery excluded from the Territories, 261; Mr. Trumbull on, 263; Slave-Trade suppression, 267; Mr. Sumner on, 269; the law of evidence, 269; Mr. Lin