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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 370 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 46 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 46 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 30 0 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 22 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 22 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) or search for Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) in all documents.

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sfaction with the conduct of this brigade. For further particulars as to gallant conduct of individuals, I beg leave to refer you to the reports of commanders of brigades, hereunto attached. Colonel Sherman speaks highly of Colonel McCoon, of Wisconsin, and Lieutenants Piper and McQuester--all on his personal staff. From my own personal staff I received, in every instance, prompt and gallant assistance, and my thanks are due to Captains Baird and Merrill; Lieutenants Houston, Abbott, Uptonon parade. Lieut. Bagley of the New York 69th, a volunteer aid, asked leave to serve with his company during the action, and is among those reported missing. I have intelligence that he is a prisoner, and slightly wounded. Colonel McCoon, of Wisconsin, a volunteer aid, also rendered good service during the day. I have the honor to be your obedient servant. W. T. Sherman, Colonel Commanding Brigade. Col. Keyes's report. Headquarters, First brigade, First Division, Camp on Meridian H
Maine, to take care of his brother, who was wounded in the back, and five others: Tompkins, Company C, Seventy-first; John Hand, of Massachusetts; a young boy of the Second Rhode Island, about 17 years old; Deegan, of the Twenty-seventh, and another, an assistant to a Maine surgeon, and his servant, who cooked for the prisoners, under the direction of Tompkins. The rest were kept out in the rain all night, and the following morning were sent to Richmond. During Monday night a man from Wisconsin died, calling for his mother. He had a daguerreotype of his wife and two children. He called me to give him some water, which I did very frequently. He called for his Dear mother --these were his last words. He was a man about 5 feet 6 inches, with a light mustache, and was wounded in the groin. A boy about 18 years old, dressed in the uniform of the Eighth regiment, about 5 feet 10 inches in height, sandy complexion, shot in the head; had $21 in his pocket-book, and a white silk badg
t has, with equal clearness, uniformity, and force, been upheld since Chief Justice Taney became the presiding ornament of that high tribunal. It was involved in the case of the United States and Booth in 21st Howard. In that instance the State of Wisconsin, through its courts, resisted the authority of the United States, and denied the validity of an act of Congress, constitutionally passed. It was the object of the writ of error to have the judgment reviewed. The supremacy of the General Government was again denied. The alleged inherent sovereignty of the State was again asserted, and the conduct of Wisconsin vindicated on those grounds. The Court unanimously, through the chief, said what I will read to you: The Constitution was not formed merely to guard the States against danger from foreign nations, but mainly to secure union and harmony at home, for if this object could be attained, there would be but little danger from abroad; and to accomplish this purpose, it was
past to fulfil their constitutional obligations, and we refer to their own statutes for the proof. * * * The States of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Iowa have enacted laws which either nullify the acts of Congress, or render useless any attempt to execute them. In many of these States the fugitive is discharged from the service or labor claimed, and in none of them has the State Goverpreviously referred. Of all the fourteen States named, as having enacted laws which either nullify the acts of Congress, or render useless any attempt to execute them, it is absolutely true that only four--Vermont, Massachusetts, Michigan, and Wisconsin--had any such laws on their statute books! But had such been enacted by every non-slaveholding State, they were unconstitutional and void, and the Constitution provides ample means to have them declared so; and the. laws of the United States g
to the toll-house to reconnoitre. From this place they had a clear view of our encampments, and could study the position, numbers, and movements of our regiments. At this place, too, Col. Bowman was taken prisoner and hustled off to Martinsburg, while his men looked out upon his capture. However, the river was crossed at an early hour on Tuesday morning. McMullin's Rangers dashed in first, the City Troop and Gen. Patterson and staff followed, and after them came the two regiments of Wisconsin and Pennsylvania. The remaining regiments took the matter less impetuously, and so lost their share in the honors of the battle. They marched leisurely into a field on the margin of the river, removed their boots, stockings, drawers, and breeches, wound these articles around their necks, and thus, with the whole lower portion of their bodies nude, and their white muslin shirts flying in the wind, preceded by a full band in similar undress, they plunged into the stream and reached the o
ngagement by Sherman's battery and two companies of regular cavalry, which, after continuing the contest for some time, were supported by the New York 12th, 1st Maine, 2d Michigan, 1st Massachusetts, and a Wisconsin regiment, when the battle was waged with great earnestness, continuing until 5 o'clock. The Federal troops were then drawn back in great confusion beyond the range of the Confederate batteries, where they bivouacked for the night. During the conflict the Michigan, Maine, and Wisconsin regiments held their ground with a fortitude which, in view of the galling fire to which they were exposed, was most remarkable, but the New York 12th and the Massachusetts 1st regiments retired in great disorder from the field, a portion of them throwing away knapsacks and even their arms, in their flight. A number of the members of the former regiments openly asserted that their confused retreat was the fault of their officers, who evinced a total lack of courage, and were the first to
uiesce in the destruction of the Government. I will go further. I charge the friends of the honorable Senator from Kentucky with the design of breaking up the Charleston Convention long before the election, with the idea of forcing this issue to break up the Government, and I prove it by the declarations of his own friends in public. Mr. Breckenridge said a great many personal allusions have been made, which, though not unparliamentary, are yet ungenerous and unjust. The Senator from Wisconsin, I suppose, believes what he says is true. I as firmly believe it not to be true, and that it was not true was proved by the conduct of those persons after the result of the election was known, in their long-continued, persistent efforts to adjust this question, but it was refused. In regard to myself, those who knew me best, know that never, from the moment I first knew what the Constitution of my country was, did I ever utter one word or cherish one thought that was false to the Consti
ream without any casualty on our side. The firing was so close to the ferry house that the same was by some chance set on fire, and, with the barn immediately adjoining, burned to the ground. The same had been used for a long time as a place of observation and security by the enemy, and from which their skirmish firing was generally conducted. On the following morning, at about eleven o'clock, the enemy's pickets having been reported gone, W. H. Langworthy and J. J. Smith, of Company E, Wisconsin regiment of Volunteers, and Wm. Moore, of Company C, Wisconsin Volunteers, again crossed, in order to complete the examinations, and when about concluded, they were surrounded and attacked by twelve of the enemy's troops, in a most daring and impetuous manner. My own, however, fell back behind the trees, after first clearing their way, where they remained skirmishing with the enemy for some time, and finally by a preconcerted signal they made a charge upon the enemy, routing them complete