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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 370 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 46 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 46 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 30 0 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 22 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 22 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) or search for Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 185 results in 102 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Abolition. (search)
itted to the Union, formed a State constitution abolishing slavery. Like constitutions were adopted by Massachusetts, including Maine, in 1780, and by New Hampshire in 1783. Gradual abolition was secured by statute in Pennsylvania in 1780, in Rhode Island and Connecticut in 1784, in New York in 1799, and in New Jersey in 1804. Abolition of slavery in the Northwest Territory, north of the Ohio and east of the Mississippi, including the present States of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and part of Minnesota, was secured by the Ordinance of 1787. In 1807, Congress passed an act for the abolition of the slave-trade on Jan. 1, 1808. Slavery in part of the Louisiana Purchase, including the present States of Iowa, Oregon, Kansas, Nebraska, part of Colorado, and part of Minnesota, was abolished by the Missouri compromise (q. v..), whose validity was rejected by the Supreme Court (see Dred Scott decision); but the provision for abolition was embodied in the constitutions of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Acquisition of Territory. (search)
hode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia. The boundaries of many of these States, as constituted by their charters, extended to the Pacific Ocean; but in practice they ceased at the Mississippi. Beyond that river the territory belonged, by discovery and settlement, to the-King of Spain. All the territory west of the present boundaries of the States was ceded by them to the United States in the order named: Virginia, 1784: Massachusetts, 1785; Connecticut, 1786 and 1800; South Carolina, 1787; North Carolina, 1790: Georgia, 1802. This ceded territory comprised part of Minnesota, all of Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio (see Northwest Territory), Tennessee, and a great part of Alabama and Mississippi. Vermont was admitted as a separate State in 1791; Kentucky, then a part of Virginia, in 1792; and Maine, till that time claimed by Massachusetts, in 1820.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Adams, Charles Kendall, 1835- (search)
Adams, Charles Kendall, 1835- Educator and historian; born in Derby, Vt., Jan. 24, 1835; was graduated at the University of Michigan. and continued his studies in Germany, France, and Italy. In 1867-85 he was Professor of History in the University of Michigan; in 1885-92 was president of Cornell University; in 1892 became president of the University of Wisconsin; and from that year till 1895 was editor-in-chief of the revised edition of Johnson's Universal Cyclopaedia. He has published many monographs and papers in reviews, and Democracy and monarchy in France; Manual of Historical Literature; British orations; Christopher Columbus, his life and work, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), American protective Association, (search)
that the conditions changed and the ambitions politician suddenly awoke to the realization that baptism in A. P. A. water was attended with pleasant and profitable political consequences. In the two years that followed the order planted itself firmly in every State and Territory in the Union, and was instrumental in overturning the entire political machinery in New York, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, and Iowa, and of California, Minnesota, Pennsylvania. Wisconsin, Washington, and Oregon, in part. With these victories commenced a general policy of active aggression, and the negative tactics of the organization were practically abandoned. The opening of the Fifty-fourth Congress demonstrated the power of the organization in the political field as no event had previously done. Nearly one hundred members of the House of Representatives were elected to office pledged to support the platform of the order, either as a whole or in part, while several me
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anderson, Rasmus Bjorn, 1846- (search)
Anderson, Rasmus Bjorn, 1846- Author and diplomatist; born in Albion, Wis., of Norwegian parentage, Jan. 12, 1846; was graduated at the Norwegian Lutheran College in Decorah, Ia., in 1866: was Professor of Scandinavian Languages and Literature at the University of Wisconsin in 1875-84, and United States minister to Denmark in 1885-89. He is author of Norse mythology; Viking tales of the North: America not discovered by Columbus; The younger Edda; First chapter of Norwegian immigration; several works in Norwegian: and also many translations of Norse writings.
rk; headquarters, St. Paul, Minn. Commander, Brig.-Gen. James F. Wade. Department of the East.--New England States, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, District of Columbia, West Virginia, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana, and District of Porto Rico, embracing Porto Rico and adjacent islands; headquarters, Governor's Island, N. Y. Commander, Maj.-Gen. John R. Brooke. Department of the Lakes.--States of Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee; headquarters, Chicago, Ill. Commander, Maj.-Gen. Elwell S. Otis. Department of the Missouri.--States of Iowa, Nebraska, Missouri, Kansas, and Arkansas, the Indian Territory, and the Territory of Oklahoma; headquarters, Omaha, Neb. Commander, Brig.-Gen. Fitzhugh Lee. Department of Texas.--State of Texas; headquarters, San Antonio. Tex. Commander, Col. Chambers McKibbin, 12th Infantry. An act of Congress of June 6, 1900,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Badger State, (search)
Badger State, A name popularly given to the State of Wisconsin on account of the number of badgers found there by the early settlers.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bailey, Joseph, 1827- (search)
Bailey, Joseph, 1827- Military officer; born in Salem, O., April 28, 1827; entered the Union army as a private in 1861; acquired great fame by his skill in damming the Red River at Alexandria (May, 1864), by which the squadron of iron-clad gunboats, under Admiral Porter, was enabled to pass down the rapids there when the water was low. He had been a lumberman in Wisconsin, and in that business had learned the practical part which he used in his engineering at Alexandria, where he was acting chief-engineer of the 19th Army Corps. Other engineers said his proposition to .dam the river was absurd, but in eleven days the boats, by his method, passed safely down. For this achievement he was promoted to colonel, brevetted brigadier-general, voted the thanks of Congress, and presented with a sword and $3,000 by the officers of the fleet. He settled in Missouri after the war, where he was a formidable enemy of the bushwhackers, and was shot by them in Nevada, in that State, on March 2
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Big Black River, battle at. (search)
ailway bridge, and were strongly fortified. Behind their defences on the eastern side of the river were several brigades; and above the bridge Pemberton had constructed a passage-way for troops, composed of the hulks of steamboats. General Carr's division led the Nationals, and first engaged in battle; and soon there was a fierce struggle between the two armies in the forest for three hours, when General Lawler, commanding Carr's right, gave an order for his brigade, composed of Iowa and Wisconsin troops, to charge. They sprang forward and drove the Confederates to their intrenchments, but suffered fearfully from an enfilading fire from a curtain of the Confederates' breastworks, which prostrated 150 of their number. The assailants waded a shallow bayou, and charged on the works before the Confederates had time to reload. Meanwhile, many of those within fled across the river, and communicated their own panic to the troops there. They expected the Nationals would immediately R
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boycotting, (search)
Boycotting, A practice which derives its name from Capt. C. C. Boycott, of Lough Mask House, in Mayo, Ireland, who in 1880, as land agent of Lord Erne, an Irish nobleman, evicted a large number of tenants. These with their friends refused to either work for him or trade with him, and would not permit others to do so. Finally sixty Orangemen from the north of Ireland, armed with revolvers and supported by a strong escort of cavalry, organized themselves into a Boycott relief expedition, and after gathering his crops carried him to a place of safety. In the United States and England the boycott is sometimes used by trade unions in times of strikes. More or less stringent laws against boycotting have been enacted in Illinois, Wisconsin, Colorado, Connecticut. Maine. Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Alabama. Florida, Georgia. Michigan, North Dakota, Oklahoma. Oregon, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Vermont.
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