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Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 94 6 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 74 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 38 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 22 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 20 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 16 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 15 9 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 14 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 12 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 12 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge). You can also browse the collection for Paris (France) or search for Paris (France) in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 8 document sections:

Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 1107 (search)
Chorus Let me call on you, beneath leafy haunts, sitting in your place of song, you, the most sweetly singing bird, tearful nightingale, oh, come, trilling through your tawny throat, to aid me in my lament, as I sing the piteous woes of Helen and the tearful fate of Trojan women under the Achaeans' spears; when he sped over the surging plains with foreign oar, when he came, came bringing to Priam's race from Lacedaemon you, Helen, his unhappy bride—Paris, fatally wedded, under the guidance of Aphrodit
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 865 (search)
cy—how is it? This man, your husband Menelaos, has openly arrived, robbed of his ships and of your counterfeit. O unhappy man! What troubles you have escaped to come here; nor do you know whether you are to return home or to stay here. For there will be strife among the gods, and a solemn assembly held by Zeus on your account this very day. Hera, who was hostile to you before, is now friendly and wants to bring you safely home, with this woman, so that Hellas may learn that the marriage of Paris, Kypris' gift, was false; but Kypris wishes to ruin your journey home, so that she may not be convicted, or seem to have bought the prize of beauty by a marriage that was profitless as regards Helen. Now the decision rests with me, whether to ruin you, as Kypris wishes, by telling my brother of your presence here, or to save your life by taking Hera's side, concealing it from my brother, whose orders are for me to tell him, whenever you happen to come to this land. One of you, go show my b
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 666 (search)
f Zeus, of Zeus, brought me to the Nile. Menelaos Amazing! Who sent you there? O dreadful story! Helen I have wept bitterly, and my eyes are wet with tears; the wife of Zeus ruined me. Menelaos Hera? Why did she want to bring trouble to the two of us? Helen Alas for my terrible fate, the baths and springs, where the goddesses brightened the beauty from which the judgment came. Menelaos Regarding the judgment, Hera made it a cause of these troubles for you? Helen To take me away from Paris— Menelaos How? Tell me. Helen To whom Kypris had promised me. Menelaos O unhappy one! Helen Unhappy, unhappy; and so she brought me to Egypt. Menelaos Then she gave him a phantom instead, as I hear from you. Helen Sorrow, sorrow to your house, mother, alas. Menelaos What do you mean? Helen My mother is no more; through shame of my disgraceful marriage she tied a noose around her neck. Menelaos Alas! Is our daughter Hermione alive? Helen Ah, my husband! Unmarried, without children,
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 597 (search)
ainly bringing something new. Messenger I say that you have suffered countless labors in vain. Menelaos You are mourning over old sorrows; what is your message? Messenger Your wife has disappeared, taken up into the folds of the unseen air; she is hidden in heaven, and as she left the hallowed cave where we were keeping her, she said this: “Miserable Phrygians, and all the Achaeans! On my account you were dying by the banks of Skamandros, through Hera's contrivance, for you thought that Paris had Helen when he didn't. But I, since I have stayed my appointed time, and kept the laws of fate, will now depart into the sky, my father; but the unhappy daughter of Tyndareus, guilty in no way, has borne an evil name without reason.” Catching sight of Helen Welcome, daughter of Leda, were you here after all? I was just announcing your departure up to the hidden starry realms, not knowing that you had a winged body. I will not let you mock us like this again, for you gave your fill of tr
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 566 (search)
do you need? Who knows better than you? Menelaos You are like her; I will not deny that at least. Helen Who then shall teach you, if not your own eyes? Menelaos It is there that I am ailing, because I have another wife. Helen I did not go to Troy; that was a phantom. Menelaos And who fashions living bodies? Helen The air, out of which you have a wife that the gods labored over. Menelaos What god's handiwork? You are saying things beyond hope. Helen Hera's, as a substitute, so that Paris would not have me. Menelaos How then could you be here and in Troy at the same time? Helen The name may be in many places, though not the body. Menelaos Let me go! I have come here with enough pain. Helen Will you leave me, and take that phantom bride away? Menelaos Yes, and fare well, for your likeness to Helen. Helen I am ruined! I found you, my husband, but I will not have you. Menelaos The greatness of my troubles over there convinces me; you do not. Helen Ah me! Who was ever mo
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 31 (search)
But Hera, indignant at not defeating the goddesses, made an airy nothing of my marriage with Paris; she gave to the son of king Priam not me, but an image, alive and breathing, that she fashioned out of the sky and made to look like me; and he thinks he has me—an idle fancy, for he doesn't have me. And in turn the plans of Zeus added further troubles to these; for he brought a war upon the land of the Hellenes and the unhappy Phrygians, so that he might lighten mother earth of her crowded mass of mortals, and bring fame to the bravest man of Hellas. So I was set up as the Hellenes' spear-prize, to test the courage of the Trojans; or rather not me, but my name. Hermes caught me up in the folds of the air and hid me in a cloud—for Zeus was not neglectful of me—and he set me down here in the house of Proteus, having selected the most self-controlled of all mankind, so that I might keep my bed pure for Menelaos. And so I am here, while my wretched husband has gathered an army and gon<
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 1 (search)
gle, if this story is true. My name is Helen; I will tell the evils I have suffered. For the sake of beauty, three goddesses came to a deep valley on Mount Ida, to Paris: Hera and Kypris, and the virgin daughter of Zeus, wishing to have the judgment of their loveliness decided. Kypris offered my beauty, if misfortune is beautiful, to a deep valley on Mount Ida, to Paris: Hera and Kypris, and the virgin daughter of Zeus, wishing to have the judgment of their loveliness decided. Kypris offered my beauty, if misfortune is beautiful, for Paris to marry, and so she won. Paris, the shepherd of Ida, left his ox-stalls and came to Sparta, to have me in marriage. to a deep valley on Mount Ida, to Paris: Hera and Kypris, and the virgin daughter of Zeus, wishing to have the judgment of their loveliness decided. Kypris offered my beauty, if misfortune is beautiful, for Paris to marry, and so she won. Paris, the shepherd of Ida, left his ox-stalls and came to Sparta, to have me in marriage.
Euripides, Helen (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 1642 (search)
and; and you shall have a favorable breeze; for we, your two savior brothers, riding over the sea, will send you to your fatherland. And when you make the last turn of the race-course and end your life, you will be named as a goddess, and share libations with the Dioskouroi, and receive gifts from men with us; for such is the will of Zeus. And the place where the son of Maia first set the boundary to your course through the air, when he took you away from Sparta, stealing your body so that Paris would not marry you—I mean the island stretched like a sentinel along the coast of Attica—shall be called by your name among men for the future, since it welcomed you when you were stolen from your home. And it is destined by the gods that the wanderer Menelaos will dwell in the islands of the blessed; for deities do not hate the well-born, but the sufferings of the multitude are greater.” Theoklymenos You sons of Leda and Zeus, I will let go my former quarrel over your sister; and mine I<