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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 16 0 Browse Search
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 3 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 26, 1860., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 2 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
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A voice from camp. As we approached the battery, he fell, waving his sword, and shouting: We are men from Massachusetts! Don't fire on us! We are men of Massachusetts! And from Berkshire to Cape Ann. We will rally for the Union of our fathers, man to man! The beacon-light of Sumter gleamed o'er our hills of pine, And lighted up a war-path for the Massachusetts line, And now, we wave our starry flag along your Southern sky, Beneath its folds to conquer, or in its shroud to die; No coward in our rear guard, no braggart in our van, While we battle for the Union of our fathers, man to man. We are men of Massachusetts! and we cannot soon forget The leaguered wall of Sumter, and its broken parapet; We saw the clouds roll outward and upward to the sun, We heard your empty boasting, one hundred men to one; We stumbled in the gloaming, on our dead at Baltimore ; But our wives forgot their weeping, and from farewells we forebore, As, from hearthstone unto hearthstone, the hurri
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.29 (search)
decision, that it is imperative to possess such a thing, before it is too late, tends towards the improvement of my health. Whatever Stanley undertook was thoroughly done. He collected lists of most of the House and Estate-agents, cut out the advertisements of places likely to suit, sorted them according to localities, and then went to work visiting them systematically. In his Journal he writes:-- Between November 15th and 30th, I have seen twenty places, in Kent, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, and Sussex, but found nothing suitable. In the photographs and descriptions furnished me by the House-agents, several of them looked quite inviting; but often a mere glance was sufficient to turn me away disgusted. There was not a house which might be said to possess one decent-sized room; those D. saw, she utterly condemned. December 16th. I have now visited fifty-seven places! Some few I reserved for a second visit with D. At last, I took her to see Furze Hill, Pirbright, Surre
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agreement of the people, (search)
in, except Dorchester, 7; Dorchester, 1. Devonshire, with the Boroughs. Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder particularly named, 12; Exeter, 2; Plymouth, 2; Barnstaple, 1. Cornwall, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein. 8. Somersetshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder named, 8; Bristol, 3; Taunton-Dean. 1. Wiltshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Salisbury, 7 ; Salisbury, 1. Berkshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Reading, 5; Reading. 1. Surrey. with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Southwark, 5; Southwark, 2. Middlesex, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder named, 4; London, 8: Westminster and the Duchy, 2. Hertfordshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, 6. Buckinghamshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, 6. Oxfordshire, with the Boroughs, T
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bennington, battle near. (search)
circumstance, for he did better service when Baum approached and began to cast up intrenchments (Aug. 14, 1777) in the town-ship of hoosick, N. Y., within about 5 miles of Bennington. Informed of that approach Stark had sent expresses for Warner's shattered regiment, and for militia, and he soon gathered many fugitives from the disaster at Hubbardton. The 15th was rainy. Baum had sent back to Burgoyne for reinforcements, and Stark was waiting for the arrival of more expected troops from Berkshire. Warner joined Stark on the morning of the 15th--he and his men drenched during a night march in the rain. The 16th dawned bright and hot, and Stark proceeded to execute a plan of attack on Baum's intrenched position by dividing his force and making a simultaneous attack at different points. The frightened Indians with Baum dashed through the encircling lines of the Americans, and fled to the shelter of the woods. After a severe contest of two hours duration, the ammunition of the Germ
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gleig, George Robert 1796-1888 (search)
Gleig, George Robert 1796-1888 Author; born in Stirling, Scotland, April 20, 1796; was educated at Glasgow and Baliol College. His publications include Campaigns of Washington and New Orleans, etc. He died in Berkshire, England, July 11, 1888.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Government, instrument of. (search)
d, the number of thirty; and the persons to be chosen to sit in Parliament for Ireland shall be, and not exceed, the number of thirty. X. That the persons to be elected to sit in Parliament from time to time, for the several counties of England, Wales, the Isles of Jersey and Guernsey, and the town of Berwick-upon-Tweed, and all places within the same respectively, shall be according to the proportions and numbers hereafter expressed: that is to say, Bedfordshire, 5; Bedford Town, 1; Berkshire, 5; Abingdon, 1; Reading, 1; Buckinghamshire, 5; Buckingham Town, 1; Aylesbury, 1; Wycomb, 1; Cambridgeshire, 4; Cambridge Town, 1; Cambridge University, 1; Isle of Ely, 2; Cheshire, 4; Chester, 1; Cornwall, 8; Launceston, 1; Truro, 1; Penryn, 1; East Looe and West Looe, 1 Cumberland, 2; Carlisle, 1; Derbyshire, 4 Derby Town, 1; Devonshire, 11; Exeter, 2; Plymouth, 2; Clifton, Dartmouth, Hardness, 1; Totnes, 1; Barnstable, 1; Tiverton, 1; Honiton, 1; Dorsetshire, 6; Dorchester, 1; Weymout
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nugent, Sir George 1757-1849 (search)
Nugent, Sir George 1757-1849 Military officer; born in Berkshire, England, June 10, 1757; served in the Revolutionary War; promoted major in 1782; took part in the bombardment of Forts Montgomery and Clinton in New York; and afterwards served in Connecticut and New Jersey. He died in Berkshire, England, March 11, 1849. Nugent, Sir George 1757-1849 Military officer; born in Berkshire, England, June 10, 1757; served in the Revolutionary War; promoted major in 1782; took part in the bombardment of Forts Montgomery and Clinton in New York; and afterwards served in Connecticut and New Jersey. He died in Berkshire, England, March 11, 1849.
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 1 (search)
Her letters from England during this visit, which was undertaken with the object of visiting her only surviving sister, whom she had not seen for very many years, are full of the warmest affection for the many friends she had made in America and of pleasant memories of her life in that country. She looked forward with pleasure to her return to Philadelphia; but this, from many causes, was delayed until increasing age and infirmity rendered it impossible, and she died near Edgebarton, Berkshire, England, about 1822, nearly eighty years old. Richard Worsam Meade remained in Spain for seventeen years, a stay far beyond his original expectations. He was, in 1806, appointed naval agent of the United States for the port of Cadiz. His residence in the country covering the whole period of the Peninsular War, he entered, during the invasion of Spain by the French, into numerous contracts with the Spanish Government involving large amounts of moneys and supplies, and in this way contribu
of Sandwich, who sent one to England. Evelyn, who died in 1706, speaks of it as a machine of great merit, and the invention of a Spaniard, Don Joseph de Lescatello. Worlidge, in his Husbandry, published 1669, also recommends it. It was fastened to the tail of a plow, and dropped the seed in the furrow. It was regarded as a curiosity merely, until a man appeared who was able to appreciate it. The system of drill husbandry of Britain is the invention of Jethro Tull, a farmer of Berkshire, England, who was an original thinker and innovator. He introduced his system in 1701, and published his Horse-hoeing husbandry in 1731. His special object in drilling was to put the plants in rows, which would allow them to be hoed by machinery. He brought brains and money to the scheme, and impoverished himself, being rather too far ahead of his time. As Loudon observes, he had very few followers in England for more than thirty years. He died soon after the publication of his book, and h
tions, the regiment had no further active service until its return home. It reached Pittsfield, Mass., Aug. 21, having returned via the Mississippi River, where it was publicly received with much enthusiasm by the citizens of Berkshire County. By special permission of the Governor of the Commonwealth, the colors of the regiment are retained in the county in the keeping of the clerk of the courts. The record of the regiment is an honorable one, and worthy of the revolutionary fame of Berkshire men. The Fiftieth Regiment was in the Department of the Gulf. After various attempts to reach its destination upon unseaworthy transports, it succeeded in arriving at New Orleans in the Jenny Lind and Montebello, Jan. 27, 1863, when the small-pox broke out among a portion of the troops on board not belonging to the Fiftieth; for which reason they were ordered to the quarantine-station, twenty miles below New Orleans. A portion of the regiment suffered somewhat from the epidemic, but n
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