Your search returned 208 results in 65 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Confederate cruisers. (search)
izes were also destroyed. During the next fortnight the Tacony made ten prizes. The last of these, the Archer, then became a ship-of-war, and the Tacony and the other prizes were burned. Read now made a raid into Portland harbor and cut out Captain James D. Bulloch, C. S. N. From a photograph. the revenue-cutter Cushing, but the inhabitants of Portland fitted out all the available steamers in port, and Read was overtaken and captured. Soon after these events the Florida proceeded to Brest, where she remained for six months undergoing repairs. She sailed in February, 1864, under the command of Captain C. M. Morris. After cruising for four months in the North Atlantic, she visited Bermuda, where she obtained supplies of coal. During the summer she continued her cruise in the Atlantic, destroying merchantmen in the neighborhood of the United States coast. On the 5th of October the Florida arrived at Bahia, in Brazil, where she found the United States sloop-of-war Wachusett
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Sketch of the principal maritime expeditions. (search)
ts, they were all driven into these a or taken: a memorable example of the defensive to imitate in like cases. The considerable expedition directed in 1802 against St. Domingo, was remarkable as a descent; it failed afterwards by the ravages of the yellow fever. After their successes against Louis XIV, the English attached themselves rather to destroying rival fleets and to conquering colonies, than to making great descents. Those which they attempted in the eighteenth century against Brest and Cherbourg, with corps of ten and twelve thousand men, could do nothing in the heart of a State as powerful as France. The astonishing conquests which gained them the empire of Hindostan, were successive. Possessors of Calcutta, and afterwards of Bengal, they were reinforced there by degrees by partial detachments, and by the Sepoys whom they disciplined to the number of a hundred and fifty thousand. The Anglo-Russian expedition against Holland, in 1799, was executed by forty thousan
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 3: Fortifications.Their importance in the defence of States proved by numerous historical examples (search)
a Rochelle, with the forts of the Isle of Re; Sables, with the forts of St. Nicholas, and Des Moulines, Isle Dieu, Belle Isle, Fort du Pilier, Mindin, Ville Martin; Quiberon, with Fort Penthievre; L'Orient, with its harbor defences; Fort Cigogne; Brest, with its harbor defences; St. Malo, with Forts Cezembre, La Canchee, L'Anse du Verger, and Des Rimains; Cherbourg, with its defensive forts and batteries; Havre, Dieppe, Boulogne, Calais, and Dunkirk. Cherbourg, Brest, and Rochefort, are great Brest, and Rochefort, are great naval depots; and Havre, Nantes, and Bordeaux, the principal commercial ports. Many of the works above enumerated are small in extent and antiquated in their construction, and some of them quite old and dilapidated, nevertheless, they have heretofore been found sufficient for the defence of the naval depots and commercial seaports of France against the superior naval forces of her neighbor. Omitting for the present all discussion of seacoast defences, let us examine more particularly the ch
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 7: sea-coast defences..—Brief description of our maritime fortifications, with an Examination of the several Contests that have taken place between ships and forts, including the attack on San Juan d'ulloa, and on St. Jean d'acre (search)
h floating defences. In 1744, a French fleet of twenty ships, and a land force of twenty-two thousand men, sailed from Brest to the English coast, without meeting with any opposition from the superior British fleet which had been sent out, under France to seek shelter. In 1755, a French fleet of twenty-five sail of the line, and many smaller vessels, sailed from Brest for America. Nine of these soon afterwards returned to France, and the others proceeded to the gulf of St. Lawrence. Anat Spithead; Sir Roger Curtis, with a smaller force, was cruising to the westward; Vice-admiral Colpoys was stationed off Brest, with thirteen sail of the line; and Sir Edward Pellew (afterwards Lord Exmouth) watched the harbor, with a small squadrofleet was eight days on the passage, and three more in landing the troops; and most of the vessels might have returned to Brest III safety, had it not been for disasters by storms, for only one of their whole number was intercepted by the vast naval
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 11: army organization.—Artillery.—Its history and organization, with a brief Notice of the different kinds of Ordnance, the Manufacture of Projectiles, &c. (search)
the British service. Experiences sur les principes du tir, faites à Metz, en 1834. Traite d'artillerie theorique et pralique. Robert. Aide-Memoire & grave;l'usage des officiers d'artillerie, (avec approbation du comite d'artillerie.) Manuel d'artillerie à l'usage des officers de la Republique Helvetique. Bonaparte, (Napoleon Louis.) Experiences comparatives entre des bouches & grave;feu en fonte de fer, d'origine Francaise, Anglaise et Suedoise, faites à Gavres, en 1836. Experiencesfaites à Brest en 1831, sur les canons. Paixhans. Essai sur l'organisation de l'artillerie. Le Bourg. Experiences sur des projectiles creux, faites en 1829, 1830, 1831. Instruction pratique sur l'emploi des projectiles, (traduit de l'allemand par Peretsdorff) Decker. Effects of heavy ordnance as applied to ships of war. Simmons. Experiences sur les poudres de guerre, faites à Esquerdes, en 1832, 1833, 1834, and 1835. Maguin. Cours d'artillerie à l'usage des sous-officiers. De Crepy. Instruction theorique<
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 56: commerce-destroyers.-their inception, remarkable career, and ending. (search)
r the affair was settled, gun-boats flocked in from the North Atlantic Squadron in pursuit of the raiders, but too late to be of use. After the Florida's cruise on the coast of Brazil. she refitted and coaled at Bermuda, and thence sailed for Brest, where she was docked and thoroughly repaired. Maffitt was relieved by Captain Joseph N. Barney, who was in turn succeeded by Captain Charles M. Morris. The Florida remained nearly six months at Brest, sailed from that port in February, 1864, aBrest, sailed from that port in February, 1864, and, after cruising for three months against American commerce, put in again at Bermuda, where Captain Morris was allowed to take in coal and provisions. The Captain announced his intention of proceeding to Mobile. but, instead of doing so, made a cruise of three months on the coast of the United States against Federal merchant vessels, proceeding thence to Teneriffe, and on the 5th of October, 1864, he arrived at Bahia. For a wonder, the U. S. S. Wachusett happened to be in Bahia when the
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The Confederate cruisers and the Alabama : the Confederate destroyers of commerce (search)
nd Casco bays was in a state of terror. The dauntless schooner shared the fate of the Clarence when the better-suited Archer fell into her clutches. But the latter's career was short. Dashing into the harbor of Portland, Maine, Read cut out the revenue cutter Caleb Cushing. The next day he was attacked, captured, and sent as a prisoner to Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor. The Florida had no less than fourteen prizes to her credit, when, late in August, 1863, she entered the harbor of Brest, France, greatly in need of repairs. Here she remained until February, 1864, and became in the mean time almost a new ship. Back and forth across the Atlantic she went, preying on the merchant vessels of the United States until, on the 5th of October, Lieutenant Morris brought her into the harbor of Bahia. Commander N. Collins, of the United States war-ship Wachusett, then in that port, on October 7, 1864, broke the laws of neutrality and ran into and captured the Florida, which got him a c
; but, instead of instantly burning her, ran her out of the harbor; being thus delayed, he was soon captured by a Federal expedition sent out against him. While under the command of Captain Maffitt the Florida, with her tenders, captured some fiftyfive vessels, many of which were of great value. The Florida being built of light timbers, her very active cruising had so deranged her machinery that it was necessary to go into some friendly harbor for repairs. Captain Maffitt says: I selected Brest, and, the Government courteously consented to the Florida having the facilities of the navy-yard, she was promptly docked. The effects of the yellow fever from which he had suffered and the fatigue attending his subsequent service had so exhausted his strength that he asked to be relieved from command of the ship. In compliance with this request, Captain C. M. Morris was ordered to relieve him. After completing all needful repairs, Captain Morris proceeded to sea and sighted the coast o
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Aboville, Francois Marie, Count Da, (search)
Aboville, Francois Marie, Count Da, Military officer; born in Brest, France, in January, 1730; came to America with the rank of colonel during the Revolutionary War, and at the siege of Yorktown commanded Rochambeau's artillery. In 1788 he was commissioned a brigadier-general; in 1792 was commander of the French Army of the North; and in 1807 became governor of Brest with the rank of lieutenant-general. He supported the cause of the Bourbons and after the Restoration was made a peer. Hes Marie, Count Da, Military officer; born in Brest, France, in January, 1730; came to America with the rank of colonel during the Revolutionary War, and at the siege of Yorktown commanded Rochambeau's artillery. In 1788 he was commissioned a brigadier-general; in 1792 was commander of the French Army of the North; and in 1807 became governor of Brest with the rank of lieutenant-general. He supported the cause of the Bourbons and after the Restoration was made a peer. He died Nov. 1, 1817.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Berlin decree, the. (search)
by the Prussians, at the instigation of Napoleon, made the act a pretext, in 1806, for employing against France a measure calculated to starve the empire. By Orders in Council (May 16) the whole coast of Europe from the Elbe, in Germany, to Brest, in France, a distance of about 800 miles, was declared to be in a state of blockade, when, at the same time, the British navy could not spare vessels enough from other fields of service to enforce the blockade over a third of the prescribed coast. Itrestrained neutrals from engaging in the coasting-trade between one hostile port and another, a commerce hitherto allowed, with some slight exceptions. This was but the extension to all hostile ports of the blockade of the coast from the Elbe to Brest established by a former order. On Nov. 17, 1807, another British Order in Council was issued, which prohibited all neutral trade with France or her allies, unless through Great Britain. In retaliation for these orders Napoleon promulgated, Dec.
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...