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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 10 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 10 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 8 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 4 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 4 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 2, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 29, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 16, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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M. Tullius Cicero, Against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge), section 40 (search)
When the men of Valentia had come to you, and when a noble and an eloquent man, Marcus Marius, was addressing you on their behalf, begging you to undertake the business, and, as the power and the name of praetor belonged to you, to act as their chief and leader in extinguishing that small band that was at Temsa, you not only shunned that task, but at that very time, while you were on the shore, that dear Tertia of yours, whom you were carrying with you, was there in the sight of all men. And to the deputies from Valentia, such an illustrious and noble municipality, you gave no answer at all in matters of such moment, while you were still in your dark-coloured tunic and cloak. What can you, O judges, suppose that this man did while on his journey? what can you suppose he did in the province itself who, when he was
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of the Susan of London to Constantinople, wherein the worshipfull M. William Harborne was sent first Ambassadour unto Sultan Murad Can, the great Turke, with whom he continued as her Majesties Ligier almost sixe yeeres. (search)
Majesties Ambassadour to the Turke, and his company, and sailed thence to Yarmouth in the foresayd Isle of Wight. The 19 we put from Wight. The 26 we did see Cavo de Sant Vincente. The same day we were thwart of Cavo Santa Maria. The 27 we passed by Tariffa, and Gibraltar . The 28 in the morning we passed by Velez Malaga: and that night were thwart of Cavo de Gates. The 29 at night we had sight of Cavo de Palos. The 30 in the morning we did see the high land of Denia , in the kingdome of Valentia , and that night we had sight of the Iland Formentera. The 31 in the morning appeared the Iland of Cabrera. The first of February we put into a Port in Mallorca , called Porto de Sant Pedro: where they would have evill intreated us for comming into the Harbour: we thought we might have bene as bolde there as in other places of Christendome, but it proved farre otherwise. The first man we met on land was a simple Shepheard, of whom we demanded whether we might have a sheepe or such like to
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The discoverie of the large, rich, and beautifull Empire of Guiana, with a relation of the great and golden citie of Manoa (which the Spaniards call El Dorado) and the provinces of Emeria, Aromaia, Amapaia, and other countries, with their rivers adjoyning. Performed in the yeere 1595 by Sir Walter Ralegh Knight, Captaine of Her Majesties Guard, Lorde Warden of the Stanneries, and Her Highnesse Lieutenant Generall of the Countie of Corne-wall. (search)
es of the Province of Venezuela, as Cumana , Coro and S. Iago (whereof Coro and S. Iago were taken by Captaine Preston, and Cumana and S. Josepho by us) we found not the value of one riall of plate in either: but the Cities of Barquasimeta, Valencia , S. Sebastian, Cororo, S. Lucia, Laguna , Maracaiba, and Truxillo, are not so easely invaded: neither doeth the burning of those on the coast impoverish the king of Spaine, any one ducat: and if we sacke the river of Hacha, S. Marta, and Cartagous to stay, yet I was resolved that they must needes have perished, for Berreo expected daylie a supply out of Spaine, and looked also hourely for his sonne to come downe from Nuevo reyno de Granada , with many horse and foote, and had also in Valencia in the Caracas , two hundreth horse ready to march, and I could not have spared above fortie, and had not any store at all of powder, leade, or match to have left with them, nor any other provision, either spade, pickeaxe, or ought else to have
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Epistle Dedicatorie of sor Walter Ralegh to the right honourable the L. Charles Howard knight of the Garter &c. and sir Robert Cecil, Councellour &c. (search)
upon two dayes warning cary all the golde they have into the land, and farre enough from the reach of our foote-men, especially the Indies being (as they are for the most part) so mountanous, so full of woodes, rivers, and marishes. In the Port townes of the Province of Venezuela, as Cumana , Coro and S. Iago (whereof Coro and S. Iago were taken by Captaine Preston, and Cumana and S. Josepho by us) we found not the value of one riall of plate in either: but the Cities of Barquasimeta, Valencia , S. Sebastian, Cororo, S. Lucia, Laguna , Maracaiba, and Truxillo, are not so easely invaded: neither doeth the burning of those on the coast impoverish the king of Spaine, any one ducat: and if we sacke the river of Hacha, S. Marta, and Cartagena , which are the Portes of Nuevo reyno, and Popayan ; there are besides within the land, which are indeed riche and populous, the townes and Cities of Merida, Lagrita, S. Christophoro, the great Cities of Pamplon S. Fe de Bogota, Tunxa and Mozo wh
ee in danger of the Spaniards in my absence, who I knewe would use the same measure towards mine, that I offered them at Trinidad: And although upon the motion Captaine Calfield, Captaine Greenvile, my nephew John Gilbert and divers others were desirous to stay, yet I was resolved that they must needes have perished, for Berreo expected daylie a supply out of Spaine, and looked also hourely for his sonne to come downe from Nuevo reyno de Granada , with many horse and foote, and had also in Valencia in the Caracas , two hundreth horse ready to march, and I could not have spared above fortie, and had not any store at all of powder, leade, or match to have left with them, nor any other provision, either spade, pickeaxe, or ought else to have fortified withall. When I had given him reason that I could not at this time leave him such a companie, he then desired mee to forbeare him and his countrey for that time, for he assured mee that I should bee no sooner three dayes from the coast
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 1: the policy of war. (search)
ng in such a war are difficult enough; to display in the first place a mass of forces proportionate to the resistance and to the obstacles which are to be encountered; to calm the popular passions by all the means possible; to use them now and then; to display a great mixture of policy, of mildness and severity, and above all great justice; such are the first elements of success. The examples of Henry IV in the wars of the League, of Marshal Berwick in Catalonia, of Suchet in Aragon and in Valencia, of Hoche in Yendee, are models of different kinds, but which may be employed according to circumstances with the same success. The admirable order and discipline, maintained by the armies of Generals Diebitsch and Paskevitch in the late war, are also models to cite, and contributed not a little to the success of their enterprises. The extraordinary obstacles which a national struggle presents to an army wishing to invade a country, have led some speculative minds to de sire that there
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Sketch of the principal maritime expeditions. (search)
of him who commanded it. A descent of altogether a similar nature to that of the King of Sweden, Charles X, was one of thirty Russian battalions crossing, in five columns, the Gulf of Bothnia upon the ice, with their artillery, in order to go to the conquest of the islands of Aland, and to spread terror even to the gates of Stockholm, whilst another division passed the gulf at Umeo, (March, 1809.) General Murray made, in 1813, a well combined descent near Tarragona to cut off Suchet from Valencia; however; after some successes, he was obliged to re-embark. The armament which England made in 1815 against Napoleon, returned from the island of Elba, was remarkable for the immense materiel which it debarked at Ostend and Antwerp. The troops amounted also to sixty thousand Anglo-Hanoverians; but the one came by land, and the others landed on the soil of a powerful ally, so that it was a successive and pacific descent rather than a military expedition. Finally, the English made, in
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 2: Strategy.—General divisions of the Art.—Rules for planning a Campaign.—Analysis of the military operations of Napoleon (search)
d Sedan. If acting offensively against Prussia and Russia, the Rhine and the Main would form the first base, the Elbe and the Oder the second, the Vistula the third, the Nieman the fourth, and the Dwina and the Dnieper the fifth. A French army operating against Spain would have the Pyrenees for its first base; the line of the Ebro for a second, resting its wings on the gulf of Gascony and the Mediterranean. If from this position it advance its left, possessing itself of the kingdom of Valencia, the line of the Sierra d'estellas becomes its third base of operations against the centre of Spain. A base may be parallel, oblique, or perpendicular to our line of operations, or to the enemy's line of defence. Some prefer one plan and some another; the best authorities, however, think the oblique or perpendicular more advantageous than the parallel; but we are not often at liberty to choose between these, for other considerations usually determine the selection. In 1806, the Frenc
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 3: Fortifications.Their importance in the defence of States proved by numerous historical examples (search)
a in 1810 sustained a siege of thirty days, two weeks being of open trench. Ciudad Rodrigo in 1810 sustained a siege of two months. Almeida in 1810 sustained a siege of more than a month. Tortosa in 1810 sustained a siege of six months. Tarragona in 1811 sustained a siege of nearly two months. Badajos in 1811 sustained a siege of more than forty days open trench. Lerida in 1811 sustained a siege of two weeks open trench. Saguntum in 1811 sustained a siege of a month. Valencia in 1811-12 sustained a siege of two months. Ciudad Rodrigo in 1812 sustained a blockade of several months, and a close siege of two weeks. Badajos in 1812 sustained twenty-one days of open trenches. Burgos in 1812 sustained thirty-three days of open trenches. St. Sebastian in 1813 sustained a siege and blockade of nearly three months, with fifty-nine days of open trenches. Pampeluna in 1813 sustained a siege of more than four months. Monzon in 1813-14 also sustained a sie
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.16 (search)
e been chronicled solely by me, because the Government won the day, as they were bound to do. Stanley now hastened to Valencia, from whence came reports of fierce cannonading; it was not in my nature to sit with folded arms, and let an important eWhy?--No telegrams are allowed to pass by order of the Minister of War.--Heigh-ho! to Alicante, then!--Thence by sea to Valencia. I'll circumnavigate Spain! but I shall get to Valencia! I exclude all words like fail, can't, from my vocabulary. Valencia! I exclude all words like fail, can't, from my vocabulary. Stanley had great difficulty, and many adventures, before he got, by sea, into Valencia, and found himself amid the roar of guns and the whiz of bullets. He wandered from street to street, always confronted by soldiers with fixed bayonets, until,Valencia, and found himself amid the roar of guns and the whiz of bullets. He wandered from street to street, always confronted by soldiers with fixed bayonets, until, at last, he saw a chance of getting into an hotel; but he had to run the gauntlet of twenty feet of murderous firing. Officers remonstrated against the folly. But twenty feet! Count three and jump! I jumped, took one peep at the barricade in my m
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