Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Cluses (France) or search for Cluses (France) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Federal Union, the John Fiske (search)
y the League won by force of arms a small bit of Italian territory about Lake Lugano, and in the sixteenth the powerful city of Bern annexed the Burgundian bishopric of Lausanne and rescued the free city of Geneva from the clutches of the Duke of Savoy. Other Burgundian possessions of Savoy were seized by the canton of Freiburg; and after awhile all these subjects and allies were admitted on equal terms into the confederation. The result is that modern Switzerland is made up of what might seSavoy were seized by the canton of Freiburg; and after awhile all these subjects and allies were admitted on equal terms into the confederation. The result is that modern Switzerland is made up of what might seem to be most discordant and unmanageable elements. Four languages— German, French, Italian, and Rhaetian— are spoken within the limits of the confederacy; and in point of religion the cantons are sharply divided as Catholic and Protestant. Yet in spite of all this, Switzerland is as thoroughly united in feeling as any nation in Europe. To the German-speaking Catholic of Altdorf the German Catholics of Bavaria are foreigners, while the French-speaking Protestants of Geneva are fellow-country
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), France, early relations with. (search)
isting war France and Spain, in the whole extent of their dominions, were to stand as one state towards foreign powers. This treaty secured to the American colonies, in advance, the aid of Charles III. of Spain. A special convention was concluded the same day between France and Spain, by which the latter agreed to declare war against England unless peace between France and England should be concluded before May, 1762. Choiseul covenanted with Spain that Portugal should be compelled, and Savoy, Holland, and Denmark should be invited, to join in a federative union for the common advantage of all maritime powers. Pitt proposed to declare war against Spain, but was outvoted, and resigned (Oct. 5, 1761). The French government was pleased when the breach between Great Britain and her colonies began, and sought to widen it. England had stripped France of her possessions in America, and France sought to dismember the British Empire, and cause it a greater loss, by the achievement of
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Metric system, (search)
system is the metre, which is 3.37 inches longer than the American yard. This base, determined by Delambre and Mechain, is the 1-40,000,000 part of the circumference of the earth on the meridian extending through France from Dunkirk to Barcelona. It was made the unit of length and the base of the system by law, April 7, 1795. A prototype metre was constructed in platinum by an international commission, representing the governments of France, Holland, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland, Spain, Savoy, and the Roman, Cisalpine, and Ligurian republics, in 1799. The unit of weight is the gramme, the weight of a cubic centimetre of water at 4° centigrade (the temperature of greatest density). The unit of measure of surface is the are, which is the square of the decametre, or 10 metres. The unit of measure of capacity is the stere, or cubic metre. The system is now in use in the United States Marine Hospital service, in the foreign business of the post-office, in the United States coast an
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nicollet, Jean Nicholas 1786-1843 (search)
Nicollet, Jean Nicholas 1786-1843 Explorer; born in Cluses, Savoy, July 24, 1786; came to the United States in 1823 to study the physical geography of North America; first travelled over the Southern States and then explored the region in which lay the sources of the Missouri, Arkansas, and Red rivers. In 1836 he explored the sources of the Mississippi. Afterwards he was employed by the War Department. His publications include Report intended to illustrate a map of the hydrographical Basin of the Upper Mississippi River. He died in Washington, D. C., Sept. 11, 1843.