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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 28 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 26 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 24 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 14 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 10 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Tuscany (Italy) or search for Tuscany (Italy) in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 6 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
o much the greater, however, was the noise the manuscripts made in the world; the Grand Duke of Tuscany heard of them and entered into treaty for them; they were brought to Florence, and he agreed tore one o'clock. Prince Maximilian of Saxony-one of whose daughters is now Duchess Dowager of Tuscany, and another was the first wife of the present Grand Duke——is now here with his pretty young wit the palace. If, however, the time should come when liberal principles again shall prevail in Tuscany, I doubt not he would exercise a controlling influence in its affairs. He savors most stronglynarotti, the head of Michel Angelo's family, and the head of the administration of justice for Tuscany,—an eminent and respectable man, whom I was glad to visit in the great artist's house, and to fJoseph and Jerome for the inheritance she claims from Madame Mere; the Princess of Canino is in Tuscany, furiously jealous of her husband, and yet refusing to join him in England. One of her daughte<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 5: (search)
ut it, but it remains still doubtful whether his treasure and labors have not been thrown away. Taking up Dr. Baird's French History of American Temperance Societies, he made many inquiries about them; said there was very little intemperance in Tuscany; spoke of spirituous liquor as an unnatural, artificial, noxious beverage, but treated wine, like a true Italian, as a gift of God, and one of the comforts and consolations of life, as healthy, and as nourishing. Coming accidentally upon the suelves, and then went to her chamber and made our adieus to the kind old lady in her bed, which was covered with the letters the post had just brought her. . . . . Few persons visited the old Etruscan and medieval towns in the western part of Tuscany forty years ago; but Mr. Ticknor stopped to enjoy the remarkable and interesting antiquities of San Gimignano and Volterra, and did not reach Pisa until the 23d of May. Pisa, May 24.—Carmignani, the principal jurist in this part of Italy,—to
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
nd it as cold as Fredericton, or colder. However, we will talk of these things in Boston next month. Meantime, give our hearty congratulations to Lady Head. She will certainly find it more agreeable in Canada, summer and winter, than in New Brunswick. Yours faithfully, Geo. Ticknor. My girls are out under the trees, reading the Paradiso, the eldest using the copy you gave her, and helping her sister, who uses the Florence edition, as she is not yet so familiar with the grand old Tuscan as to read him without notes that are very ample. To John Kenyon, London. Boston, January 8, 1855. dear Kenyon,—I do not choose to have another year get fairly on its course, without carrying to you assurances of our continued good wishes and affection. The last we heard from you was through Mrs. Ticknor's correspondent, ever-faithful Lady Lyell, who said she had seen you in the Zoological Gardens, well, comfortable, and full of that happiness that goodness bosoms ever. But this sec
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 15: (search)
h many persons at home, merely on the business of the Library. Consequently, he did not, as before, keep a journal of his daily experiences, and his more private correspondence also suffered in consequence of his constant occupation. In Florence he established an agency in the autumn, and attended again to its affairs in the spring. He determined, after some preliminary correspondence with an old acquaintance in Florence, Mr. Sloane, to go to the Baron von Reumont, Prussian Minister in Tuscany, whom Humboldt at Berlin had described to me as a historical writer, whose works he valued very highly, and whom he advised me strongly to visit as a person who would receive me kindly, and give me the best of literary help about Italian affairs and books, as he has lived in Italy above twenty years. Mr. Ticknor had known Baron von Reumont in Rome twenty years before, when he was attache to the legation of Baron Bunsen, and he says of him, in all sorts of ways he has turned out an invaluab
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
esires none. In the troubles of 1848-49, when, not quite blind, he was for some months at the head of affairs, he did good service to the state by counsels of moderation; and now, when everything is changed, he preserves not only the respect of Tuscany, but of enlightened Italians everywhere; and even the personal kindness of the Grand Duke, who spoke to me of him with great respect, while on his part he did full justice to the Grand Duke, and his motives. But his main attributes are those of a wise, learned philosopher. He ought to have lived in the days of the Stoa, or in the best days of the Roman Republic, and would have left his mark on either. The Baron von Reumont, Prussian Minister in Tuscany, who has been in Italy twenty years,—and whom Humboldt told me he considered eminently qualified to write a history of any part of the Peninsula,—said to me, Once a week I spend an afternoon with the Marquis Capponi to take a lesson in Italian history. Nobody knows it as he does.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
omas, I. 180, 277. Truchsess, II. 41. Tudor, William, Life of James Otis, I. 338 and note. Turin, visits, II. 37-42, 351-353. Turner, Robert, II. 374 Tuscany, Grand Duchess Dowager of, II. 54, 55, 90. Tuscany, Grand Duchess of, II. 54, 89, 90. Tuscany, Leopold Grand Duke of, I. 489, II. 49, 50, 51, 53, 54, 315, 3Tuscany, Grand Duchess of, II. 54, 89, 90. Tuscany, Leopold Grand Duke of, I. 489, II. 49, 50, 51, 53, 54, 315, 339, 340. Twisleton, Hon., Edward, II. 321 and note, 323, 329, 356, 357 364, 365, 366, 370. 373, 376, 378, 379, 387, 397, 429; letters to, 418, 482, 483. Twisleton, Hon Mrs. Edward, II. 321 and note. 329, 356, 357. 358, 359, 363, 364, 365, 366, 368, 370, 376, 378, 379, 397, 400, 419, 420, 429, 431 Tyrol, II. 34, 99 TytlerTuscany, Leopold Grand Duke of, I. 489, II. 49, 50, 51, 53, 54, 315, 339, 340. Twisleton, Hon., Edward, II. 321 and note, 323, 329, 356, 357 364, 365, 366, 370. 373, 376, 378, 379, 387, 397, 429; letters to, 418, 482, 483. Twisleton, Hon Mrs. Edward, II. 321 and note. 329, 356, 357. 358, 359, 363, 364, 365, 366, 368, 370, 376, 378, 379, 397, 400, 419, 420, 429, 431 Tyrol, II. 34, 99 Tytler, Patrick Fraser, II. 150. U Ubalpo, Marchese, I. 175. Ugoni, Camillo, II 103, 107. Ullmann, Professor, II. 100. Uncle Tom's Cabin, II 286. V Van Buren, Martin, I. 372, 409. Van De Weyer, Sylvain, II. 149, 310, 311, 323, 325, 372. Vane, Lord, Harry, II. 382. Van Rensselaer, General, I. 381. Varnhagen