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James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 10, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 4 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Balaklava (Ukraine) or search for Balaklava (Ukraine) in all documents.

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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 5: Seven Pines or fair Oaks (search)
sses as follows:— Seven Pines, May 31, 1862 POSITIONBRIGADEPRESENTKILLEDWOUNDEDMISSINGtotalPERCENT Front rightRodes22002418535109950 Front leftGarland2065986004274037 Rear leftAnderson, G. B.18651496803786647 6130488213384270544 This record shows great fighting power, and will compare favorably for a half-day's fighting of an equal body of men, with any records of the war. At Waterloo, the losses were: Allies 20 per cent, French 34 per cent, British regulars 29 per cent. At Balaklava, the Light Brigade (600) lost 49 per cent. On the Federal side the battle was opened by Casey's division, moderately well fortified with trenches, batteries, and abattis, and soon supported by Peck's brigade of Couch's division. These four brigades were finally routed from their first line by the Rains's flank movement. They then fell back upon the second intrenched line, where they united with Couch's two remaining brigades. Rains's brigade now dropped out of the fight. The three
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 17: Gettysburg: second day (search)
fternoon of the first day, when Ewell stopped the pursuit, and it must ever remain a grave reflection upon the Confederate conduct of the battle that the weakest part of the Federal position was the only portion which was not attacked. It will be more fully described in the account of the action on the 3d. Thus ended the second day, and one is tempted to say that thus ended the battle of Gettysburg. For of the third (lay it must be said, as was said of the charge of the Six Hundred at Balaklava, Magnificent, but not War! The first day had been won by 17 Confederate brigades of infantry attacking 13 Federal. The victory was fruitless because Ewell stopped the pursuit in full tide. On the second day, Longstreet, with 11 brigades, in seven piecemeal attacks, drives back six Federal brigades, which, being gradually reenforced by 18 fresh brigades, check the Confederate advance, and recover part of the lost ground, before night ends the conflict. Cooperative attacks by Ewell