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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 20 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 8 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10 6 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 4 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 4 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 2 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Demosthenes, Speeches 1-10. You can also browse the collection for Chersonese (Ukraine) or search for Chersonese (Ukraine) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

Demosthenes, Philippic 1, section 41 (search)
So you, if you hear of Philip in the Chersonese, vote an expedition there; if at Thermopylae, you vote one there; if somewhere else, you still keep pace with him to and fro. You take your marching orders from him; you have never framed any plan of campaign for yourselves, never foreseen any event, until you learn that something has happened or is happening. All this was once perhaps possible; now things have come to a crisis, so that it is no longer in your power.
Demosthenes, Philippic 2, section 30 (search)
the men,Aeschines and, in particular, Philocrates (Dem. 19.46). I say, who told you that I, being a water-drinker, was naturally a disagreeable, cross-grained fellow, and that Philip, if he got through the Pass, would do just what you would pray for, would fortify Thespiae and Plataea, and humble the Theban pride, and dig a trench across the ChersoneseTo protect the Greek cities from the raids of the Thracians. at his own charges, and restore to you Euboea and Oropus in lieu of Amphipolis. All this was said from this very platform, as I am sure you recollect, although you are not remarkable for keeping in mind those who injure y
Demosthenes, On the Chersonese, section 17 (search)
If, therefore, our present force is still in being, it will be able both to save the Chersonese and to make raids upon Philip's territory. But if it is once disbanded, what shall we do if he marches against the Chersonese? “Bring Diopithes to trial,” you say. And how will that help matters? “Well, then, we will set out from Athens ourselves.” But suppose hilip's territory. But if it is once disbanded, what shall we do if he marches against the Chersonese? “Bring Diopithes to trial,” you say. And how will that help matters? “Well, then, we will set out from Athens ourselves.” But suppose the winds will not let us? “But surely Philip will not attack.” And who will go bail for that? Do you not observe and consi
Demosthenes, On the Chersonese, section 18 (search)
what seasonThe season of the Etesian winds; see Dem. 8.14. of the year is upon us—the season at which certain people think it their duty to keep the Hellespont clear of you and hand it over to Philip? What if he quits Thrace and never approaches the Chersonese or Byzantium—for you must take that also into your reckoning—but turns up at Chalcis and Megara, just as he did at Oreus not long ago? Will it be better to make our stand here and let the war spread to Attica, or to contrive some employment for him away yonder? I prefer the la
Demosthenes, Philippic 3, section 19 (search)
So far from saying that, I date his hostility from the very day when he wiped out the Phocians. I say that you will be wise if you defend yourselves now, but if you let the opportunity pass, you will not be able to act even when you desire to. I so far dissent, Athenians, from all you counsellors that I do not think you ought to trouble yourselves now about the Chersonese or Byzantium.