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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Conclusion (search)
for the support and aggrandizement of the home government. The hostility of England to the United States during our rebellion was not so much real as it was apparent. It was the hostility of the leaders of one political party [Whig]. I am told that there was no time during the civil war when they were able to get up in England a demonstration in favor of secession, while these were constantly being gotten up in favor of the Union, or, as they called it, in favor of the North. Even in Manchester, which suffered so fearfully by having the cotton cut off from her mills, they had a monster demonstration in favor of the North at the very time when their workmen were almost famishing. It is possible that the question of a conflict between races may come up in the future, as did that between freedom and slavery before. The condition of the colored man within our borders may become a source of anxiety, to say the least. But he was brought to our shores by compulsion, and. he now sh
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Index. (search)
ders to P. F. Blair, Jr., 122; his measures to save the Border States, 131 Liverpool cotton merchants, 79 Longstreet, General, 179 Louisiana, attitude of, with regard to secession, 2, 8; secession of, 14 Louisville, 135 Lyon, Captain, Nathaniel, 116 et seq., 122 et seq., 123 Lyons, Lord, 94 M. Magoffin, Governor, 126 et seq., 132, 134 et seq. Mallory, Senator, 37 et seq., 40 Manassas, first movement against, 162 et seq.; description of, 175 et seq. Manchester, Eng., cotton operators of, 79 Martinsburg, W. Va., 162, 163 Maryland, attitude of, with regard to secession, 52, 83, 80; rebel conspiracies to gain, 107, 108; Union enlistments in, 131 Mason, Senator, 25, 91, 142 Massachusetts Eighth Infantry, 92, 103 Massachusetts Sixth Infantry, 84; attack upon, in Baltimore, 85 et seq.; map of its route through Baltimore, 85, 99 McCauley, Commandant, 96 McClellan, Gen. George B., placed in command of Dept. of the Ohio, 140; in West V
large rebel cavalry force, under General Forrest. After a desperate conflict of several hours' duration, during which neither party obtained the victory, General Sullivan arrived on the field with reinforcements, and attacked the rebels, routing them with great slaughter.--(Doc. 94.) The battle of Stone River, or Murfreesboro, Tenn., fought by the Union army of the Cumberland, under the command of Major-General Rosecrans, and the rebel forces under General Bragg, commenced early this morning. After a desperate conflict of more than ten hours duration, both armies receded and suspended operations for the night, the contest being undecided.--(Docs. 26 and 146.) Emancipation was celebrated in various portions of the loyal States of the Union.--A meeting of the workingmen of Manchester, England, was held at Free trade Hall, for the purpose of passing resolutions in support of the National cause in the United States, and agreeing on an address to President Lincoln.--(Doc. 96.)
January 19. President Lincoln addressed a letter to the workingmen of Manchester, England, acknowledging the receipt of an address and resolutions adopted by them at a meeting held at Manchester on the 31st of December, 1862. In closing his letter the President said: I do not doubt that the sentiments you have expressed will be sustained by your great nation; and, on the other hand, I have no hesitation in assuring you that they will excite admiration, esteem, and the most reciprocal feManchester on the 31st of December, 1862. In closing his letter the President said: I do not doubt that the sentiments you have expressed will be sustained by your great nation; and, on the other hand, I have no hesitation in assuring you that they will excite admiration, esteem, and the most reciprocal feelings of friendship among the American people. I hail this interchange of sentiment, therefore, as an augury that, whatever else may happen, whatever misfortune may befall your country or my own, the peace and friendship which now exist between the two nations will be, as it shall be my desire to make them perpetual. --(Doc. 119.) The Third battalion of the Fifth Pennsylvania cavalry, commanded by Major Wm. G. McCandless, made a reconnoissance in the direction of Barnesville, Va., thoroug
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 24: the called session of Congress.--foreign relations.--benevolent organizations.--the opposing armies. (search)
ould be manufactured at home. None of these had yet arrived; and the only ordnance that had crossed the ocean, for use by the National troops, was a battery of six Whitworth cannon, which were sent over and presented to the Government by loyal Americans residing in England. They were 12-pounders, and each bore the inscription:--from loyal Americans in Europe to the United States Government, 1861. The funds for their purchase were collected chiefly by R. G. Moulton, then residing in Manchester, England. The cost of the six guns, including the freight, was Whitworth cannon. twelve thousand dollars. They ,vere purchased of the Whitworth Ordnance Company of Manchester. They were each nine feet long, and were loaded at the breech; and the weight of each was eleven hundred pounds. The bore was three inches, and rifled, and the ball was a double cone of iron, nine inches long. The charge required to throw the ball five miles was two pounds and one-half of powder. In addition to a
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 2: Lee's invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania. (search)
se of the world, were they immediately to enter into negotiations with the great powers of Europe, for the purpose of obtaining the acknowledgment by them of the independence of the Confederate States of North America. and these culminated in the spring of 1864 in the formation of a Southern Independence Association, with a British peer (Lord Wharncliffe) as President, and a membership composed of powerful representatives of the Church, State, and Trade. This association was formed in Manchester in April, 1864, and the announcement of its organization, together with a list of its officers and members, was published in the Manchester Guardian on the 9th of that month. Nearly nine hundred names appeared in the list, representing the highest and most influential classes in England — members of the House of Lords, and of the House of Commons, not a few; baronets, clergymen, lawyers, magistrates, and merchants, prominent in all parts of the country, and representing immense wealth and
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 7: recruiting in New England. (search)
to use for that purpose, and their government held it and did so use it. The last loan was the Cotton loan, which could not have been taken for a dollar if this article had not been kept in the South, and its price raised by our blockade. Indeed, in all the markets of the world for the production of cotton goods, cotton so increased in price during the war that it was a serious temptation to England to acknowledge Southern independence in order to get cotton to supply the industries of Manchester. The South did not suffer for arms, neither heavy ordnance nor infantry, weapons nor munitions, during the latter years of the war. The greatly enhanced price of cotton made blockade running immensely profitable; and as the Confederate government had half of all the cotton which ran the blockade with which to buy arms and munitions of war, that supplied the South very fully. It will be remembered that at the opening of the war the wise men who governed the country through the newspaper
Mr. Mason in Parliament.--The person who attracted most attention at the opening of Parliament was the Southern Commissioner, Mr. Mason, who had a seat in one of the side-galleries. Singularly enough, his next neighbor was a negro of the deepest dye, one of the Haytian embassy, I believe; at all events, he must have been of note to get a place in that exclusive locality. Necessity brings people into strange companionship. I noticed that he listened very intently to the speech until the end of the paragraph relating to the Trent affair had been read, and then he laid his hands over his knees, leaned back, and yawned vigorously, as though he was terribly bored by the whole business. Correspondent of the Manchester (Eng.) Weekly Express and Review.
Doc. 96.-address to President Lincoln By the citizens of Manchester, England. To Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States: As citizens of Manchester, assembled at the Free-Trade Hall, we beg to express our fraternal sentiments toward you and your country. We rejoice in your greatness as an outgrowth of England, whose blood and language you share, whose orderly and legal freedom you have applied to new circumstances, over a region immeasurably greater than our own. We honorManchester, assembled at the Free-Trade Hall, we beg to express our fraternal sentiments toward you and your country. We rejoice in your greatness as an outgrowth of England, whose blood and language you share, whose orderly and legal freedom you have applied to new circumstances, over a region immeasurably greater than our own. We honor your Free States, as a singularly happy abode for the working millions where industry is honored. One thing alone has, in the past, lessened our sympathy with your country and our confidence in it — we mean the ascendency of politicians who not merely maintained negro slavery, but desired to extend and root it more firmly. Since we have discerned, however, that the victory of the free North, in the war which has so sorely distressed us as well as afflicted you, will strike off the fetters of
Doc. 119.-President Lincoln's letter to the citizens of Manchester, England. see Doc. 96, page 344 ante. Manchester, February 10, Manchester, February 10, 1863. The following letter and inclosure were received yesterday by the Mayor of Manchester, Abel Heywood, Esq.: Legation of the UnitManchester, Abel Heywood, Esq.: Legation of the United States, London, February 9, 1863. sir: I have the honor to transmit to you, by the hands of Mr. Moran, the Assistant Secretary of this Lddressed to you as chairman of the meeting of workingmen, held at Manchester, on the thirty-first of December, and in acknowledgment of the adant, Charles Francis Adams. Abel Heywood, Esq., Chairman, etc., Manchester. Executive mansion, Washington, January 19, 1863. To the Workingmen of Manchester: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of the address and resolutions which you sent me on the eve of the new year. know, and deeply deplore, the sufferings which the workingmen at Manchester, and in all Europe, are called to endure in this crisis. It has
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