Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Manchester (United Kingdom) or search for Manchester (United Kingdom) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agreement of the people, (search)
th the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Shrewsbury, 6; Shrewsbury, 1. Cheshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Chester, 5; Chester, 2. Lancashire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Manchester, 6; Manchester and the Parish, 1. Yorkshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereafter named, 15; York City and the County thereof, 3; Kingston upon Hull and the County thereof, 1; Leeds Town and Parish, 1.Manchester and the Parish, 1. Yorkshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereafter named, 15; York City and the County thereof, 3; Kingston upon Hull and the County thereof, 1; Leeds Town and Parish, 1. Durham County Palatine, with the Boroughs. Towns, and Parishes therein, except Durham and Gateside, 3; Durham City, 1. Northumberland, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder named, 3; Newcastle upon Tyne and the County thereof, with Gateside, 2; Berwick, 1. Cumberland, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, 3. Westmoreland, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, 2. Wales Anglesea, with the Parishes therein2 Brecknoc
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Beecher, Henry Ward, 1813- (search)
, since I have been in England, although I have met with greater kindness and courtesy on the part of most than I deserved, yet, on the other hand, I perceive that the Southern influence prevails to some extent in England. (Applause and uproar.) It is my old acquaintance; I understand it perfectly (laughter), and I have always held it to be an unfailing truth that where a man had a cause that would bear examination he was perfectly willing to have it spoken about. (Applause.) And when in Manchester I saw those huge placards: Who is Henry Ward Beecher? (Laughter, cries of Quite right, and applause.) And when in Liverpool I was told that there were those blood-red placards, purporting to say what Henry Ward Beecher had said, and calling upon Englishmen to suppress free speech — I tell you what I thought. I thought simply this: I am glad of it. (Laughter.) Why? Because if they had felt perfectly secure, that you are the minions of the South and the slaves of slavery, they would have
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burgoyne, Sir John, 1723-1792 (search)
out 2,100. Afterwards they were removed to Lancaster, Pa., and some to East Windsor, Conn. In the course of 1782 they were all dispersed, either by exchange or desertion. Many of the Germans remained in America. The disaster to Burgoyne's army produced a profound sensation in England. This was intensified by indications that France was disposed to acknowledge the independence of the colonies. Efforts were made to supply the place of the lost troops by fresh recruits. Liverpool and Manchester undertook to raise each 1,000 men, and efforts were made to induce London to follow the example. The new lord mayor worked zealously for that purpose, but failed, and the ministry had to be content with a subscription of $100,000 raised among their adherents. Nor did the plan succeed in the English counties. In Scotland it was more successful; Glasgow and Edinburgh both raised a regiment, and several more were enlisted in the Scotch Highlands by the great landholders of that region, to
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Consular service, the (search)
ional Board of Trade and other commercial bodies. Between March 4 and Dec. 31, 1893, thirty out of thirty-five consuls-general and 133 out of 183 first-class consuls and commercial agents were changed, the numbers in the British Empire alone being seven consuls-general (the entire number), and sixty-two out of eighty-eight consuls and commercial agents. In Great Britain and Ireland the consul-general and eighteen consuls and commercial agents out of a total of twenty-four were changed, Manchester being the only first-class consulate omitted from this clean sweep. It is impossible to suppose that such an upheaval was intended to benefit the consular service, or that it could have been otherwise than exceedingly detrimental to its efficiency. Nor is it a matter for surprise, when the numerous removals which have taken place afterwards are added to the above figures, that most people should agree with Mr. Theodore Roosevelt in the opinion that the present system is undoubtedly dir
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Electricity. (search)
of electro-magnetism, thoughtful men have contemplated the possibility of producing a controllable electric illuminator and motor. In 1845 John W. Starr, of Cincinnati, filed a caveat in the United States Patent Office for a divisible electric light. He went to England to complete and prove the utility of his invention. There George Peabody, the American banker, offered him all the money he might need, in case his experiment should be successful. It proved so at an exhibition of it at Manchester before scientific men. Professor Incandescent lamp. Faraday pronounced it perfect. Starr was so excited by his success that he died that night, and nothing more was done with the invention. In 1859 Prof. Moses G. Farmer (q. v.) lighted a parlor at Salem, Mass., by an electric lamp, but the cost of producing it, by means of a galvanic battery in the cellar, was so great that the use of it was abandoned. These were the pioneers in our country. Now the generation of electricity by dyna
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Everett, Edward, 1794-1865 (search)
ast 11 o'clock in the morning General Buford passed through Gettysburg upon a reconnoissance in force, with his cavalry, upon the Chambersburg road. The information obtained by him was immediately communicated to General Reynolds, who was, in consequence, directed to occupy Gettysburg. That gallant officer accordingly, with the 1st Corps, marched from Emmettsburg to within 6 or 7 miles of this place, and encamped on the right bank of Marsh's Creek. Our right wing, meantime, was moved to Manchester. On the same day the corps of Hill and Longstreet were pushed still farther forward on the Chambersburg road, and distributed in the vicinity of Marsh's Creek, while a reconnoissance was made by the Confederate General Petigru up to a very short distance from this place. Thus at night, fall on June 30 the greater part of the rebel force was concentrated in the immediate vicinity of two corps of the Union army, the former refreshed by two days passed in comparative repose and deliberate
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Expositions, industrial. (search)
ity. The United States stands alone in maintaining four permanent expositions: one in the former Art Palace of the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, now known as the Field Columbian Museum; another in the former Memorial Hall of the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia; and two, known as Commercial Museums, in Philadelphia. The following is a list of the principal industrial expositions of the world, to nearly all of which the United States has been a large contributor: London, 1851; Cork, 1852; New York, New Brunswick, Madras, and Dublin, each 1853; Munich, 1854; Paris, 1855; Edinburgh and Manchester, each 1857; London, 1862; Paris, 1867; Vienna, 1873; Philadelphia, 1876; Paris, 1878; Atlanta, 1881; Louisville, 1883; New Orleans, 1884-85; Paris, 1889; Chicago, 1893; Atlanta, 1895; Nashville, 1897; Omaha, 1898; Omaha and Philadelphia, each 1899; Paris, 1900; Buffalo and Glasgow, each 1901. For details of the most noteworthy of these expositions, see their respective titles.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fox, George 1624-1691 (search)
riting. The son, who George Fox. was grave and contemplative in temperament, was apprenticed to a shoemaker, and made the Scriptures his constant study. The doctrines he afterwards taught were gradually fashioned in his mind, and believing himself to be called to disseminate them, he abandoned his trade at the age of nineteen, and began his spiritual work, leading a wandering life for some years, living in the woods, and practising rigid self-denial. He first appeared as a preacher at Manchester, in 1648, and he was imprisoned as a disturber of the peace. Then he travelled over England, meeting the same fate everywhere, but gaining many followers. He warmly advocated all the Christian virtues, simplicity in worship, and in manner of living. Brought before a justice at Derby, in 1650, he told the magistrate to quake before the Lord, and thereafter he and his sect were called Quakers. Taken before Cromwell, in London, that ruler not only released him, but declared his doctrines
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Free trade. (search)
y, with the exception of agricultural labor. The wages of miners, we learn, have increased in Staffordshire (which, almost certainly, is the mining district of lowest increment) by 50 per cent. In the great exportable manufactures of Bradford and Huddersfield, the lowest augmentations are 20 and 30 per cent., and in other branches they rise to 50, 83, 100, and even to 150 and 160 per cent. The quasidomestic trades of carpenters, bricklayers, and masons, in the great marts of Glasgow and Manchester, show a mean increase of 63 per cent. for the first, 65 per cent. for the second, and 47 per cent. for the third. The lowest weekly wage named for an adult is 22s. (as against 17s. in 1833), and the highest 36s. But it is the relative rate with which we have to do; and, as the American writer appears to contemplate with a peculiar dread the effect of free trade upon shipping, I further quote Mr. Giffen on the monthly wages of seamen in 1833 and 1883, in Bristol, Glasgow, Liverpool, and Lo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gottheil, Gustave 1827- (search)
Gottheil, Gustave 1827- Rabbi; born in Pinne, Germany, May 28, 1827; educated at the University of Berlin and the Institute for Hebrew Literature. Assistant rabbi at Berlin in 1855-60; rabbi at Manchester, England, in 1860-72; rabbi of the Temple Emanuel in New York City since 1873. His son, Richard Gottheil, is the Professor of Rabbinical Literature and Semitic Languages in Columbia University, and the author of the article on Jews and Judaism in vol. v., p. 146.
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