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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 62 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 20 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 16 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 8 0 Browse Search
Bacchylides, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 8 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 8 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 6 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Libation Bearers (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 6 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Eudemian Ethics 4 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler). You can also browse the collection for Pytho (Greece) or search for Pytho (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 2, line 480 (search)
a, Graia, and the fair city of Mykalessos. They also held Harma, Eilesium, and Erythrae; and they had Eleon, Hyle, and Peteon; Ocalea and the strong fortress of Medeon; Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe the haunt of doves; Coronea, and the pastures of Haliartus; Plataea and Glisas; the fortress of Thebes the less; holy Onchestos with its famous grove of Poseidon; Arne rich in vineyards; Midea, sacred Nisa, and Anthedon upon the sea. From these there came fifty ships, and in each there were a hundred and twenty young men of the Boeotians. Askalaphos and Ialmenos, sons of Ares, led the people that dwelt in Aspledon and Orkhomenos the realm of Minyas. Astyoche a noble maiden bore them in the house of Aktor son of Azeus; for she had gone with Ares secretly into an upper chamber, and he had lain with her. With these there came thirty ships. The Phocaeans were led by Schedios and Epistrophos, sons of mighty Iphitos the son of Naubolos. These were they that held Cyparissus, rocky Pytho,
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 9, line 334 (search)
an women in Hellas and Phthia, daughters of kings that have cities under them; of these I can take whom I will and marry her. Many a time was I minded when at home in Phthia to woo and wed a woman who would make me a suitable wife, and to enjoy the riches of my old father Peleus. My life [psukhĂȘ] means more to me than all the wealth of Ilion while it was yet at peace before the Achaeans went there, or than all the treasure that lies on the stone floor of Apollo's temple beneath the cliffs of Pytho. Cattle and sheep are to be had for harrying, and a man buy both tripods and horses if he wants them, but when his life has once left him it can neither be bought nor harried back again. "My mother Thetis tells me that there are two ways in which I may meet my end [telos]. If I stay here and fight, I shall lose my safe homecoming [nostos] but I will have a glory [kleos] that is unwilting: whereas if I go home my glory [kleos] will die, but it will be a long time before the outcome [telos]