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M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 8 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
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Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington), Book 3, Poem 4 (search)
g green the stock-doves crown'd— A legend, nay, a miracle, By Acherontia's nestlings told, By all in Bantine glade that dwell, Or till the rich Forentan mould. “Bears, vipers, spared him as he lay, The sacred garland deck'd his hair, The myrtle blended with the bay: The child's inspired: the gods were there.” Your grace, sweet Muses, shields me still On Sabine heights, or lets me range Where cool Praeneste, Tibur's hill, Or liquid Baiae proffers change. Me to your springs, your dances true, Philippi bore not to the ground, Nor the doom'd tree in falling slew, Nor billowy Palinurus drown'd. Grant me your presence, blithe and fain Mad Bosporus shall my bark explore; My foot shall tread the sandy plain That glows beside Assyria's shore; 'Mid Briton tribes, the stranger's foe, And Spaniards, drunk with horses' blood, And quiver'd Scythians, will I go Unharm'd, and look on Tanais' flood. When Caesar's self in peaceful town The weary veteran's home has made, You bid him lay his helmet down A<
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Julius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 89 (search)
Scarcely any of those who were accessory to his murder, survived him more than three years, or died a natural death.Suetonius particularly refers to the conspirators, who perished at the battle of Philippi, or in the three years which intervened. The survivors were included in the reconciliation of Augustus, Antony, and Pompey, A.U.C. 715. They were all condemned by the senate: some were taken off by one accident, some by another. Part of them perished at sea, others fell in battle; and some slew themselves with the same poniard with which they had stabbed Caesar. Suetonius alludes to Brutus and Cassius, of whom this is related by Plutarch and Dio.
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Augustus (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 29 (search)
reason of his building a new forum was the vast increase in the population, and the number of causes to be tried in the courts, for which, the two already existing not affording sufficient space, it was thought necessary to have a third. It was therefore opened for public use before the temple of Mars was completely finished; and a law was passed, that causes should be tried, and judges chosen by lot, in that place. The temple of Mars was built in fulfilment of a vow made during the war of Philippi, undertaken by him to avenge his father's murder. He ordained that the senate should always assemble there when they met to deliberate respecting wars and triumphs; that thence should be despatched all those who were sent into the provinces in the command of armies; and that in it those who returned victorious from the wars, should lodge the trophies of their triumphs. He erected the temple of ApolloThe temple of the Palatine Apollo stood, according to Bianchini, a little beyond the triumph
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Augustus (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 89 (search)
He neither slighted his own dreams nor those of other people relating to himself. At the battle of Philippi, although he had resolved not to stir out of his tent, on account of his being indisposed, yet, being warned by a dream of one of his friends, he changed his mind; and well it was that he did so, for in the enemy's attack, his couch was pierced and cut to pieces, on the supposition of his being in it. He had many frivolous and frightful dreams during the spring; but in the other parts of the year, they were less frequent and more significative. Upon his frequently visiting a temple near the Capitol, which he had dedicated to Jupiter Tonans, he dreamt that Jupiter Capitolinus complained that his worshippers were taken from him, and that upon this he replied, he had only given him The Thunderer for his porter. Perhaps the point of the reply lay in the temple of Jupiter Tonans being placed at the approach to the Capitol from the Forum? See c. xxix. and c. xxx., with the note. He th
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Augustus (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 94 (search)
He certainly had a presentiment of the issue of all his wars. When the troops of the Triumviri were collected about Bolognia, an eagle, which sat upon his tent, and was attacked by two crows, beat them both, and struck them to the ground, in the view of the whole army; who thence inferred that discord would arise between the three colleagues, which would be attended with the like event: and it accordingly happened. At Philippi, he was assured of success by a Thessalian, upon the authority, as he pretended, of the Divine Casar himself; who had appeared to him while he was travelling in a bye-road. At Perugia, the sacrifice not presenting any favourable intimations, but the contrary, he ordered fresh victims; the enemy, however, carrying off the sacred things in a sudden sally, it was agreed amongst the augurs, that all the dangers and misfortunes which had threatened the sacrificer, would fall upon the heads of those who had got possession of the entrails. And, accordingly, so it happe
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 1, line 639 (search)
ee the closing scene 'Of this foul war in foulest murder done. 'Again the factions rise; through all the world Once more I pass; but give me some new land, 'Some other region, Phoebus, to behold 'Washed by the Pontic billows! for these eyes 'Already once have seen Philippi's plains! 'The confusion between the site of the battle of Philippi and that of the battle of Pharsalia is common among the Roman writers. (See the note to Merivale, chapter xxvi.) The frenzy left her and she speechless fell. ee the closing scene 'Of this foul war in foulest murder done. 'Again the factions rise; through all the world Once more I pass; but give me some new land, 'Some other region, Phoebus, to behold 'Washed by the Pontic billows! for these eyes 'Already once have seen Philippi's plains! 'The confusion between the site of the battle of Philippi and that of the battle of Pharsalia is common among the Roman writers. (See the note to Merivale, chapter xxvi.) The frenzy left her and she speechless fell.
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 6, line 507 (search)
of her he trod Through desert fields. Meanwhile a faithful band, His ministers of guilt, mid tombs and vaults All ruined wandering, beheld the witch Seated afar upon a lofty crag Where Haemus reaches out Pharsalian spurs.Confusing Pharsalia with Philippi. (See line 685.) There was she proving for her gods and priests Of magic, words unknown, and framing chants Of dire and novel purpose : for she feared Lest Mars should stray into another world, And spare Thessalian soil the blood ere long To flow in torrents; and thus she forbade Philippi's field, polluted with her song, Thick with her poisonous distilments sown, To let the war pass by. Such deaths, she hopes, Soon shall be hers! the blood of all the world Shed for her use! to her it shall be given To sever from their trunks the heads of kings, Plunder the ashes of the noble dead, Italia's bravest, and in triumph add The mightiest warriors to her host of shades. This her sole toil, from Magnus' tombless corse What she may snatch, on w