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Diodorus Siculus, Library 16 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 14 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 6 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese) 4 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 4 0 Browse Search
Andocides, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, A Dialogue on Oratory (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 2 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 2 0 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Pausanias, Description of Greece. You can also browse the collection for Melos (Greece) or search for Melos (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 2 document sections:

Pausanias, Description of Greece, Elis 1, chapter 23 (search)
.C. On the right of the pedestal are inscribed the cities which took part in the engagement: first the Lacedaemonians, after them the Athenians, third the Corinthians, fourth the Sicyonians, fifth the Aeginetans; after the Aeginetans, the Megarians and Epidaurians, of the Arcadians the people of Tegea and Orchomenus, after them the dwellers in Phlius, Troezen and Hermion, the Tirynthians from the Argolid, the Plataeans alone of the Boeotians, the Argives of Mycenae, the islanders of Ceos and Melos, Ambraciots of the Thesprotian mainland, the Tenians and the Lepreans, who were the only people from Triphylia, but from the Aegean and the Cyclades there came not only the Tenians but also the Naxians and Cythnians, Styrians too from Euboea, after them Eleans, Potidaeans, Anactorians, and lastly the Chalcidians on the Euripus. Of these cities the following are at the present day uninhabited: Mycenae and Tiryns were destroyed by the Argives after the Persian wars. The Ambraciots and Anactor
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Elis 2, chapter 14 (search)
s' boxing-match. The artist who represented Telestas was Silanion. The statue of Milo the son of Diotimus was made by Dameas, also a native of Crotona. Milo won six vMilo won six victories for wrestling at Olympia, one of them among the boys; at Pytho he won six among the men and one among the boys. He came to Olympia to wrestle for the seventhrefused, moreover, to come to close quarters with him. It is further stated that Milo carried his own statue into the Altis. His feats with the pomegranate and the qua a tree-trunk that was drying up; wedges were inserted to keep the trunk apart. Milo in his pride thrust his hands into the trunk, the wedges slipped, and Milo was hMilo was held fast by the trunk until the wolves—a beast that roves in vast packs in the land of Crotona—made him their prey. Such was the fate that overtook Milo. Pyrrhus, theMilo. Pyrrhus, the son of Aeacides, who was king on the Thesprotian mainland and performed many remarkable deeds, as I have related in my account of the Athenians,Paus. 1.11 had his st