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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 62 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 16 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 12 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 8 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 8 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 8 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 8 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 8 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Ion (ed. Robert Potter) 6 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley). You can also browse the collection for Parnassus (Greece) or search for Parnassus (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 3, line 169 (search)
Meanwhile all nations of the earth were moved To share in Magnus' fortunes and the war, And in his fated ruin. Graecia sent, Nearest of all, her succours to the host. From Cirrha and Parnassus' double peak And from Amphissa, Phocis sent her youth: From swift Cephisus' fate-declaring stream, And Theban Dirce, chiefs Boeotian came: All Pisa mustered and Alpheus' youths,It was generally believed that the river Alpheus of the Peloponnesus passed under the sea and reappeared in the fountain of Arethusa at Syracuse. A goblet was said to have been thrown into the river in Greece, and to have reappeared in the Sicilian fountain. See the note in Grote's 'History of Greece,' Edition 1862, vol. ii., p. 8. Alpheus who in far Sicilian lands Beyond the billows seeks the day again: Arcadian Maenalus, and OEta loved By Hercules, and old Dodona's oaks Are left to silence; for the sacred train With all Epirus rushes to the war. Athens, deserted at the call to arms, Yet found three vessels in Apollo'
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 5, line 71 (search)
Between the western belt and that which boundsSee Book IV., 82. The furthest east, midway Parnassus rears His double summit:'Thus far hath one of steep Parnassus' brows Sufficed me: henceforth there is need of both, For my remaining enterprise.' Dante, 'Paradise,' i., 16 (Cary.) to the Bromian god And Paean consecrate, to whom coParnassus' brows Sufficed me: henceforth there is need of both, For my remaining enterprise.' Dante, 'Paradise,' i., 16 (Cary.) to the Bromian god And Paean consecrate, to whom conjoined The Theban band leads up the Delphic feast On each third year. This mountain, when the sea Poured o'er the earth her billows, rose alone, By loftiest peak scarce master of the waves, Parting the crest of waters from the stars. There, to avenge his mother, from her home Chased by the angered goddess while as yet She bore himceits Sought to dissuade the chieftain from his zeal To learn the future. ' What this hope,' she cried, Roman, that moves thy breast to know the fates? 'Long has Parnassus and its silent cleft 'Stifled the god; perhaps the breath divine 'Has left its ancient gorge and through the world 'Wanders in devious paths; or else the fane, '