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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.24 (search)
not be doing. He delighted in reading Caesar, Thucydides, Xenophon, Polybius, and lighter books also did not come amiss. From Cheltenham, he wrote:-- I have begun again on Thucydides. Gladstone's Gleanings are ended. They are all good. Strange! how I detect the church-going, God-fearing, conscientious Christian, in almost every paragraph. Julian Corbett's Drake is fair; I am glad I read it, and refreshed myself with what I knew before of the famous sailor. From the Bell Hotel, Gloucester, he wrote, June 3, 1891:-- I had a long walk into the country, which is simply buried under bushy green of grass and leaves. I saw the largest river in England yesterday: it appears to be a little wider than what I could hop over with a pole in my best days. It was a dirty, rusty-coloured stream, but the meadows were fat. The country seems to perspire under its covering of leafy verdure. I always loved the English country, and my secret attachment for it seemed to me well confirme
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 7.48 (search)
demand of William. War was the result of this refusal. The Conqueror regarding the Scottish war as a thing of little importance, sent Roger, a Norman nobleman, against Malcolm. But the King defeated and dispersed this army. Richard, Earl of Gloucester, was then sent with a stronger force, but he was incessantly harrassed by Patrick Dunbar, an ancestor of General Lee, and kept constantly engaged in light skirmishes, so that he accomplished but little. Odo, William's brother, was now sent witf Scottish auxiliaries to the assistance of King Henry III. On the death of Queen Margaret, in 1290, he claimed the throne of Scotland. He died in 1295, aged eighty-five. In 1244 he married Isabel, daughter of Gilbert de Clare, third Earl of Gloucester. Their eldest son, VIII.--Robert Bruce, Lord of Annandale, born about 1245, accompanied King Edward I to Palestine in 1269, and was ever after highly regarded by that Prince. In 1271 he married Margaret, sole heiress of the Earl of Carrick
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agreement of the people, (search)
, and Parishes therein, 6. Oxfordshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder named, 4; Oxford City, 2; Oxford University, 2. Gloucestershire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Gloucester, 7; Gloucester, 2. Herefordshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Hereford, 4; Hereford, 1. Worcestershire, with the Boroughs. Towns, and Parishes therein, except Worcester, 4; Woreester, 2. Warwickshire, with tGloucester, 2. Herefordshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Hereford, 4; Hereford, 1. Worcestershire, with the Boroughs. Towns, and Parishes therein, except Worcester, 4; Woreester, 2. Warwickshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Coventry, 5; Corentry, 2. Northamptonshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Northampton. 5 ; Northampton, 1. Bedfordshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, 4. Cambridgeshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder particularly named. 4; Cambridge University, 2; Cambridge Town, 2. Essex, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Colchester, 11; Colc
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Anne, Queen, (search)
father in his exile to France, but was dissuaded by Sarah Churchill, chief lady of the bed-chamber (afterwards the imperious Duchess of Marlborough), for whom she always had a romantic attachment. By the act of settlement at the accession of William and Mary, the crown was guaranteed to her in default of issue to these sovereigns. This exigency happening. Anne was proclaimed queen (March 8. 1702) on the death of William. Of her seventeen children, only one lived beyond infancy--Duke of Gloucester — who died at the age of eleven years. Feeble in character, but very amiable, Anne's reign became a conspicuous one in English history, for she was governed by some able ministers, and she was surrounded by eminent literary men. Her reign has been called the Augustan age of English Literature. The Duke of Marlborough the husband of her bosom friend, was one of her greatest Queen Anne. military leaders. A greater part of her reign was occupied in the prosecution of the War of the Spani
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bacon, Nathaniel, 1642- (search)
riot; born in Suffolk, England, Jan. 2, 1642. He was educated at the Inns of Court. London: came to America with a considerable fortune in 1670; settled in Gloucester county. Va., and owned a large estate high up on the James River. A lawyer by profession and eloquent in speech, he easily exercised great influence over the peoplimmediately marched against the Indians. The faithless governor, relieved of his presence, crossed the York River, called a convention of the inhabitants of Gloucester county. and proposed to proclaim Bacon a traitor. The convention refused to do so, when the haughty baronet issued such a proclamation on his own responsibility. en Bacon hastened to meet the approaching royalists, who, not disposed to fight, deserted their leader and joined the rebels. At the same time the royalists of Gloucester yielded their allegiance to Racon, and he resolved to cross the Chesapeake and drive the royalists and Berkeley from Virginia. His plans were suddenly frustrat
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Government, instrument of. (search)
bridge University, 1; Isle of Ely, 2; Cheshire, 4; Chester, 1; Cornwall, 8; Launceston, 1; Truro, 1; Penryn, 1; East Looe and West Looe, 1 Cumberland, 2; Carlisle, 1; Derbyshire, 4 Derby Town, 1; Devonshire, 11; Exeter, 2; Plymouth, 2; Clifton, Dartmouth, Hardness, 1; Totnes, 1; Barnstable, 1; Tiverton, 1; Honiton, 1; Dorsetshire, 6; Dorchester, 1; Weymouth and Melcomb-Regis, 1; Lyme-Regis, 1; Poole, 1; Durham, 2; City of Durham, 1; Essex, 13; Malden, 1; Colchester, 2; Gloucestershire, 5; Gloucester, 2; Tewkesbury, 1; Cirencester, 1; Herefordshire, 4; Hereford, 1; Leominster, 1; Hertfordshire, 5; St. Alban's, 1; Hertford, 1; Huntingdonshire, 3; Huntingdon, 1; Kent, 11; Canterbury, 2; Rochester, 1; Maidstone, 1 ; Dover, 1; Sandwich, 1; Queenborough, 1; Lancashire, 4; Preston, 1; Lancaster, 1; Liverpool, 1; Manchester, 1; Leicestershire, 4; Leicester, 2; Lincolnshire, 10; Lincoln, 2; Boston, 1; Grantham, 1; Stamford, 1; Great Grimsby, 1; Middlesex, 4; London, 6; Westminster, 2; Monmouth
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Tucker, Josiah 1711-1799 (search)
Tucker, Josiah 1711-1799 Clergyman; born in Laugharne, Wales, in 1711; educated at Oxford, he took orders, and was for many years a rector in Bristol; in 1758 he was Dean of Gloucester; he was a prolific writer on political and religious subjects, and published several tracts on the dispute between Great Britain and the American colonies, which attracted much attention. The British ministry knew more of the differences of opinion in the Continental Congress than did the Americans, for Gould have still retained a large and influential party in the colonies, the hatreds engendered by war would have been avoided, and, at the worst, the colonies would have been lost to Great Britain, as they finally were, without the expenditure of blood and treasure on both sides which the war caused. But vulgar expedients were preferred, and this proposition was denounced as the height of folly, and even the wise Burke called it childish. Dean Tucker died in Gloucester, England, Nov. 4, 1799.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts (search)
ensive military powers; it made a complete organization of the militia, embodied a force of minute-men, consisting of one quarter part of the force of the colony, and appointed to the chief command Jedediah Preble, Artemas Ward, and Seth Pomeroy; it proceeded to carry on the government; collectors of taxes were ordered to pay no more money to the late treasurer of the province, but to hand over all future collections to a treasurer appointed by the Congress.] Josiah Tucker, dean of Gloucester, England, declares the North American colonies should be a free and independent people......1774 Provincial Congress of Massachusetts, consisting of upwards of 300 members, meet at Cambridge......Feb. 1, 1775 Governor Gage sends a detachment of soldiers to Salem to seize some cannon said to be deposited there; they are met by a party of militia, but no collision takes place......Feb. 26, 1775 British troops, about 800 strong, under Lieutenant-Colonel Smith, start towards Concord abo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washington, Mary 1706-1659 (search)
el Ball, of Lancaster, to distinguish him from another Colonel Ball, his cousin. When Mary Ball was about seventeen years of age she wrote to her brother in England on family matters a letter which is still in existence, the conclusion of which is as follows: We have not had a school-master in our neighborhood until now (Jan. 14, 1728) in nearly four years. We have now a young master living with us, who was educated at Oxford, took orders, and came over as assistant to Reverend Kemp, of Gloucester. That parish is too poor to keep both, and he teaches school for his board. He teaches sister Susie and me and Madam Carter's boy and two other scholars. I am now learning pretty fast. Mamma, Susie, and I all send love to you and Mary. This letter from your loving sister, Mary Ball. Mary Ball married Augustine Washington in 1730. Their first child was George Washington, who, when seventeen years of age, wrote the following memorandum in his mother's Bible: George Washington, son t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Whitefield, George 1714- (search)
Whitefield, George 1714- Clergyman; born in Gloucester, England, Dec. 16, 1714; was a religious enthusiast in very early life, fasting twice a week for thirty-six hours, and at the age of eighteen became a member of the club in which the denomination of Methodists took its rise. He became intimately associated in religious matters with John and Charles Wesley. In 1736 he was ordained deacon, and preached with such extraordinary effect the next Sunday that a complaint was made that he had driven fifteen persons mad. The same year the Wesleys accompanied Oglethorpe to Georgia, and in 1737 John Wesley invited Whitefield to join him in his work in America. He came in May, 1738; and after George Whitefield. laboring four months, and perfecting plans for founding an orphan-house at Savannah, he returned to England to receive priest's orders and to collect funds for carrying out his benevolent plans. With more than $5,000 collected he returned to Savannah, and there founded an
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