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Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 2 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Truculentus, or The Churl (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 2 0 Browse Search
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Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.), Scroll 15, line 9 (search)
e of the others wishes to go to bed let him leave us and do so; he can then take my master's pigs out when he has done breakfast in the morning. We two will sit here eating and drinking in the hut, and telling one another stories about our misfortunes; for when a man has suffered much, and been buffeted about in the world, he takes pleasure in recalling the memory of sorrows that have long gone by. As regards your question, then, my tale is as follows: "You may have heard of an island called Syra that lies over above Ortygia, where the land begins to turn round and look in another direction. It is not very thickly peopled, but the soil is good, with much pasture fit for cattle and sheep, and it abounds with wine and wheat. Dearth never comes there, nor are the people [dêmos] plagued by any sickness, but when they grow old Apollo comes with Artemis and kills them with his painless shafts. It contains two communities, and the whole country is divided between these two. My father Ktesios
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 7, line 453 (search)
s hour. While the king Aegeus and his son rejoiced, Minos prepared for war. He was invincible in men and ships—and stronger in his rage to wreak due vengeance on the king who slew his son Androgeus. But first he sought some friends to aid his warfare; and he scoured the sea with a swift fleet—which was his strength. Anaphe and Astypalaea, both agreed to join his cause—the first one moved by promises, the second by his threats. Level Myconus and the chalky fields of Cimolus agreed to aid, and Syros covered with wild thyme, level Seriphos, Paros of marble cliffs, and that place which Arne the impious Siphnian had betrayed, who having got the gold which in her greed she had demanded, was changed to a bird which ever since that day imagines gold its chief delight—a black-foot black-winged daw. But Oliarus, Didymae, and Tenos, Gyaros, Andros, and Peparethos rich in its glossy olives, gave no aid to the strong Cretan fleet. Sailing from them Minos went to Oenopia, known realm of the Aeacid
T. Maccius Plautus, Truculentus, or The Churl (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 2, scene 4 (search)
ely sent me a letter hither, that he'll make trial how much I value him. If I should raise and bring up the child which I should bear, that then I should have all his property. DINARCHUS I listen with pleasure. In fine, what is it you are contriving? PHRONESIUM My mother ordered the servant-maids, since now the tenth month is arriving close at hand, each to go in some different direction, to seek out and bespeak a boy or a girl, to be passed off as my own. Why need I make many words? You know Syra, the female hair-dresserThe female hair-dresser: "Tonstricem." Warner translates the word "tonstrix," "tire-woman;" but the real meaning is, "a female hair-dresser" or "barber." They were women who used to cut the hair and pare the nails of females., who now lives hard by our house? DINARCHUSI know her. PHRONESIUM She, with the utmost care, went about among the families, and secretly found out a child, and brought it to me. She said it was given to her. DINARCHUS O shocking traffic! She the