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Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 6 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 4 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 4 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 4 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 4 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 2 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 2 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams). You can also browse the collection for Cyclades (Greece) or search for Cyclades (Greece) in all documents.

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P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 3, line 121 (search)
The tale was told us that Idomeneus, from his hereditary kindgom driven, had left his Crete abandoned, that no foe now harbored there, but all its dwellings lay untenanted of man. So forth we sailed out of the port of Delos, and sped far along the main. The maenad-haunted hills of Naxos came in view; the ridges green of fair Donysa, with Olearos, and Paros, gleaming white, and Cyclades scattered among the waves, as close we ran where thick-strewn islands vex the channelled seas with rival shout the sailors cheerly called: “On, comrades! On, to Crete and to our sires!” Freely behind us blew the friendly winds, and gave smooth passage to that fabled shore, the land of the Curetes, friends of Jove. There eagerly I labored at the walls of our long-prayed-for city; and its name was Pergamea; to my Trojan band, pleased with such name, I gave command to build altar and hearth, and raise the lofty tow
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 8, line 671 (search)
his squadron forth: upon his brows he wears the peerless emblem of his rostral crown. Opposing, in barbaric splendor shine the arms of Antony: in victor's garb from nations in the land of morn he rides, and from the Red Sea, bringing in his train Egypt and Syria, utmost Bactria's horde, and last—O shameless!—his Egyptian spouse. All to the fight make haste; the slanted oars and triple beaks of brass uptear the waves to angry foam, as to the deep they speed like hills on hill-tops hurled, or Cyclades drifting and clashing in the sea: so vast that shock of castled ships and mighty men! Swift, arrowy steel and balls of blazing tow rain o'er the waters, till the sea-god's world flows red with slaughter. In the midst, the Queen, sounding her native timbrel, wildly calls her minions to the fight, nor yet can see two fatal asps behind. Her monster-gods, barking Anubis, and his mongrel crew, on Neptune, Venus, and Minerva fling their impious arms; the face of angry Mars, carved out of iron, in