Your search returned 180 results in 66 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Libellus de politica conservatia Maris. Or, The Pollicy of keeping the Sea. (search)
ed: Wich Duke sent againe, and him excused, Rehearsing that the mount of Saincte Michael, And Sainct Malo would never a dell Be subject unto his governance, Nor be under his obeysance: And so they did withouten him that deede. But when the king anon had taken heede: Hee in his herte set a judgement, Without calling of any Parliament, Or greate tarry to take long advise To fortifie anon he did devise Of English Townes three, that is to say, Dertmouth, Plymouth , the third it is Fowey : And gave hem helpe and notable puisance With insistence set them in governance Upon pety Bretayne for to werre. Those good sea men would no more differre, But bete hem home and made they might not rowte, Tooke prisoners, and made them for to lowte. And efte the Duke, an ensample wise, Wrote to the king as he first did devise, Him excusing: But our men wood With great power passed over the floode And werred foorth into the Dukes lond
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The commodities of pety Britaine, with her Rovers on the sea. The third Chapter. (search)
ed: Wich Duke sent againe, and him excused, Rehearsing that the mount of Saincte Michael, And Sainct Malo would never a dell Be subject unto his governance, Nor be under his obeysance: And so they did withouten him that deede. But when the king anon had taken heede: Hee in his herte set a judgement, Without calling of any Parliament, Or greate tarry to take long advise To fortifie anon he did devise Of English Townes three, that is to say, Dertmouth, Plymouth , the third it is Fowey : And gave hem helpe and notable puisance With insistence set them in governance Upon pety Bretayne for to werre. Those good sea men would no more differre, But bete hem home and made they might not rowte, Tooke prisoners, and made them for to lowte. And efte the Duke, an ensample wise, Wrote to the king as he first did devise, Him excusing: But our men wood With great power passed over the floode And werred foorth into the Dukes lond
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A storie of Edward the third his ordinance for Britayne. (search)
ed: Wich Duke sent againe, and him excused, Rehearsing that the mount of Saincte Michael, And Sainct Malo would never a dell Be subject unto his governance, Nor be under his obeysance: And so they did withouten him that deede. But when the king anon had taken heede: Hee in his herte set a judgement, Without calling of any Parliament, Or greate tarry to take long advise To fortifie anon he did devise Of English Townes three, that is to say, Dertmouth, Plymouth , the third it is Fowey : And gave hem helpe and notable puisance With insistence set them in governance Upon pety Bretayne for to werre. Those good sea men would no more differre, But bete hem home and made they might not rowte, Tooke prisoners, and made them for to lowte. And efte the Duke, an ensample wise, Wrote to the king as he first did devise, Him excusing: But our men wood With great power passed over the floode And werred foorth into the Dukes lond
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A report of Master Robert Flicke directed to Master Thomas Bromley, Master Richard Staper, and Master Cordall concerning the successe of a part of the London supplies sent to my Lord Thomas Howard to the Isles of the Azores, 1591. (search)
reased, as that the Prize was forced to cut over her maine maste: otherwise with the violence of the storme, her ground tackle being bad, she had driven on shore: which was the most cause that moved me to put in here; intending now here to discharge the goods without further adventure, and have certified thus much unto my Lord Admirall, and therewith also desired to understande the direction of the Lords of the Counsell together with yours, insomuch as my Lord Thomas Howard is not returned. How the rest of our consorts which were separated from us by weather have sped, or what Prizes they have taken, whereof there is much hope by reason of the scattering of the West Indian Fleete, as yet we are able to say nothing. And thus expecting your answere, and for all other matters referring me unto the bearer Captaine Furtho, I end. Plymouth the 24 of October. 1591. Your worships loving friend Robert Flicke.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Agreement of the people, (search)
Chichester, with the Suburbs and Liberties thereof, 1. Southampton County, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder named, 8 ; Winchester, with the Suburbs and Liberties thereof, 1; Southampton Town and the County thereof, 1. Dorsetshire, with the Boroughs. Towns, and Parishes therein, except Dorchester, 7; Dorchester, 1. Devonshire, with the Boroughs. Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder particularly named, 12; Exeter, 2; Plymouth, 2; Barnstaple, 1. Cornwall, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein. 8. Somersetshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except such as are hereunder named, 8; Bristol, 3; Taunton-Dean. 1. Wiltshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Salisbury, 7 ; Salisbury, 1. Berkshire, with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Reading, 5; Reading. 1. Surrey. with the Boroughs, Towns, and Parishes therein, except Southwark, 5; Southwar
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bradford, William, 1588-1657 (search)
anied the Pilgrims to America, and was one of the foremost in selecting a site for the colony. Before the Pilgrims landed, his wife fell into the sea from the Mayflower, and was drowned. He succeeded John Carver (April 5, 1621) as governor of Plymouth colony. He cultivated friendly relations with the Indians; and he was annually rechosen governor as long as he lived, excepting in five years. He wrote a history of Plymouth colony from 1620 to 1647, which was published by the Massachusetts HisPlymouth colony from 1620 to 1647, which was published by the Massachusetts Historical Society in 1856. He died in Plymouth, Mass., May 9, 1657. printer; born in Leicester, England, in 1658. A Friend, or Quaker, he came to America with Penn's early colonists in 1682. and landed near the spot where Philadelphia was afterwards built. He had learned the printer's trade in London, and, in 1686, he printed an almanac in Philadelphia. Mixed up in a political and social dispute in Pennsylvania, and suffering thereby, he removed to New York in 1693, and in that year prin
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Congregational Church (search)
iness. The officers of the church consist of a pastor, or pastors, and deacons, the number of both being determined by its needs. The principal instrument of church union lays in ecclesiastical councils, whose functions is to give counsel and to express fellowship, but never to issue commands. It is in this feature that the Congregational Church in the United States differs from that in Great Britain. The early home of Congregationalism was in New England, to which it was brought by the earliest settlers. The Pilgrims in Plymouth and the Puritans in Massachusetts and Connecticut united in its adoption. This form of church order has spread to the West and Northwest, but in the South and Southwest it is less strong. The Congregationalists have long recognized the importance of culture and an educated ministry, and have been the founders and supporters of many schools, colleges, and theological seminaries. In 1899 they reported 5,639 ministers, 5,620 churches, and 628,234 members.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Connecticut (search)
a counter-claim soon afterwards, based upon a patent issued by the King to English subjects. The agent of the Dutch West India Company took formal possession by proclamation of the Connecticut Valley as early as 1623 in the name of the States-General of Holland, and a peaceable and profitable trade with the Indians might have been carried on had not the Dutch exasperated the natives by seizing one of their chiefs and demanding a heavy ransom for his release. A Dutch embassy which visited Plymouth tried to get the Pilgrims to abandon Cape Cod Bay and seat themselves, under the jurisdiction of New Netherland, in the fertile Connecticut Valley, and a Mohegan chief, moved by equally strong self-interest, invited them to the same territory, his object being to make the English a barrier between his people and the powerful and warlike Pequods. In 1632 Edward Winslow visited the Connecticut Valley, and confirmed the truth of all the pleasant things the Dutch and Indians had said about i
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Drake, Sir Francis, -1595 (search)
and Drake returned to England stripped of all his property. The Spanish government refused to indemnify him for his losses, and he sought revenge and found it. Queen Elizabeth gave him a commission in the royal navy, and in 1572 he sailed from Plymouth with two ships for the avowed purpose of plundering the Spaniards. He did so successfully on the coasts of South America, and returned in 1573 with greater wealth than he ever possessed before. Drake was welcomed as a hero; he soon won the title honorably by circumnavigating the globe. He had seen from a mountain on Darien the waters of the Pacific Ocean, and resolved to explore them. Under the patronage of the Queen, he sailed from Plymouth in December, 1577; passed through the Strait of Magellan into the Pacific Ocean; pillaged the Spanish settlements on the coasts of Peru and Chile, and a Spanish galleon laden with gold and silver bullion; and, pushing northward, discovered the bay of San Francisco, took possession of California
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Exmouth, Edward Pellew, Viscount, 1757-1833 (search)
57-1833 naval officer; born in Dover, England, April 19, 1757; entered the navy at the age of thirteen years; first distinguished himself in the battle on Lake Champlain, in 1776; and rendered great assistance to Burgoyne in his invasion of New York. He became a post-captain in 1782. For the first capture of a vessel of the French navy (1792), in the war with France, Pellew was knighted and employed in blockading the French coast. For bravery in saving the people of a wrecked ship at Plymouth, in 1796, he was made a baronet. Pellew was in Parliament in 1802, but in 1804 was again in the naval service; was promoted to rear-admiral, and made commander-in-chief in the East Indies, when he annihilated the Dutch naval force there. He was created Baron Exmouth in 1814; made a full admiral of the blue, and allowed a pension of $10,000 a year. With a fleet of nineteen ships, he brought the Dey of Algiers to terms in 1816, and liberated about 1,200 prisoners. He died in Teignmouth, Ja
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...