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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The English Voyages, Navigations, and Discoveries (intended for the finding of a North-west passage) to the North parts of America, to Meta incognita, and the backeside of Gronland , as farre as 72 degrees and 12 minuts: performed first by Sebastian Cabota, and since by Sir Martin Frobisher, and M. John Davis, with the Patents, Discourses, and Advertisements thereto belonging. (search)
is, John Kelley, Edward Helman, William Dicke, Andrew Maddocke, Thomas Hill, Robert Wats Carpenter, William Russell, Christopher Gorney boy: James Cole, Francis Ridley, John Russell, Robert Cornish Musicians. The Mooneshine had 19. persons, William Bruton Captaine, John Ellis Master, the rest Mariners. The 7. of June the Captaine and the Master drewe out a proportion for the continuance of our victuals. The 8. day the wind being at Southwest and West southwest, we put in for Falmouth , where we remained untill the 13. The 13. the wind blew at North, and being faire weather we departed. The 14. with contrary wind we were forced to put into Silley. The 15. wee departed thence, having the wind North and by East moderate and faire weather. The 16. wee were driven backe againe, and were constrained to arrive at newe Grymsby in Silley: here the winde remained contrary 12. dayes, and in that space the Captaine, the Master and I went about all the Ilands, and the Ca
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The first voyage of M. John Davis, undertaken in June 1585. for the discoverie of the Northwest passage, Written by M. John Janes Marchant, sometimes servant to the worshipfull Master William Sanderson. (search)
is, John Kelley, Edward Helman, William Dicke, Andrew Maddocke, Thomas Hill, Robert Wats Carpenter, William Russell, Christopher Gorney boy: James Cole, Francis Ridley, John Russell, Robert Cornish Musicians. The Mooneshine had 19. persons, William Bruton Captaine, John Ellis Master, the rest Mariners. The 7. of June the Captaine and the Master drewe out a proportion for the continuance of our victuals. The 8. day the wind being at Southwest and West southwest, we put in for Falmouth , where we remained untill the 13. The 13. the wind blew at North, and being faire weather we departed. The 14. with contrary wind we were forced to put into Silley. The 15. wee departed thence, having the wind North and by East moderate and faire weather. The 16. wee were driven backe againe, and were constrained to arrive at newe Grymsby in Silley: here the winde remained contrary 12. dayes, and in that space the Captaine, the Master and I went about all the Ilands, and the Ca
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of the ship called the Marigold of M. Hill of Redrife unto Cape Briton and beyond to the latitude of 44 degrees and an half, 1593 Written by Richard fisher Master Hilles man of Redriffe. (search)
d to the latitude of 44 degrees and an half, 1593 Written by Richard fisher Master Hilles man of Redriffe. THE ship called the Marigold of 70 tunnes in burthen furnished with 20 men, wherof 10 were Mariners, the Masters name being Richard Strong of Apsham, the Masters mate Peter Langworth of Apsham, with 3 coopers, 2 butchers to flea the Morsses or sea Oxen (whereof divers have teeth above a cubit long & skinnes farre thicker then any buls hide) with other necessary people, departed out of Falmouth the 1 of June 1593 in consort of another ship of M. Drakes of Apsham, which upon some occasion was not ready so soone as shee should have bene by two moneths. The place for which these two ships were bound was an Island within the streightes of Saint Peter on the backe side of Newfoundland to the Southwest in the latitude of fortie seven degrees, called by the Britons of Saint Malo the Isle of Ramea, but by the Savages and naturals of the Continent next adjoyning, Menquit: On which Isle a
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of M. Charles Leigh, and divers others to Cape Briton and the Isle of Ramea. (search)
afton, and the Chancewel of London of the burthen of 70 tunnes, wherof was M. Steven Bennet, bound unto the river of Canada , set to sea at the sole and proper charge of Charles Leigh and Abraham Van Herwick of London merchants (the saide Charles Leigh himselfe, and Steven Van Herwick brother to the sayd Abraham, going themselves in the said ships as chiefe commanders of the voyage) departed from Graves-end on Fryday morning the 8 of April 1597. And after some hindrances, arriving at Falmouth in Cornewal the 28 of the said moneth put to sea againe. And with prosperous windes the 18 of May we were upon the banke of Newfoundland . The 19 we lost the Chancewel. The 20 we had sight of land and entred within the bay of Assumption, where our men contrary to my knowledge fought with a French ship: and afterward in the same bay wee met with our consort. Whereupon we presently put to sea againe: and the next day we arrived at Caplen bay, where we remained by extremitie of foule weather,
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Voyages and Navigations of the English nation to Virginia , and the severall discoveries therof chiefly at the charges of the honourable Sir Walter Ralegh knight, from 33 to 40 degrees of latitude: together with the successe of the English colonies there planted: as likewise a description of the Countrey, with the Inhabitants, and the manifold commodities. Whereunto are annexed the patents, letters, discourses, &c. to this part belonging. (search)
was sent for England . The 25. our Generall wayed anker, and set saile for England . About the 31. he tooke a Spanish ship of 300 tunne richly loaden, boording her with a boate made with boards of chests, which fell asunder, and sunke at the ships side, assoone as ever he and his men were out of it. The 10. of September, by foule weather the Generall then shipped in the prize, lost sight of the Tyger. The 6. the Tyger fell with the Landes end, and the same day came to anker at Falmouth . The 18. the General came with the prize to Plymmouth, and was courteously received by divers of his worshipfull friends. The names of those as well Gentlemen as others, that remained one whole yeere in Virginia , under the Governement of Master Ralph Lane. MASTER PHILIP AMADAS, Admirall of the countrey. Master Hariot. Master Acton. Master Edward Stafford. Thomas Luddington. Master Marvyn.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voiage made by Sir Richard Greenvile, for Sir Walter Ralegh, to Virginia , in the yeere 1585. (search)
ecotan , and the same day came aboord our Fleete ryding at Wococon. The 21. our Fleete ankering at Wococon, we wayed anker for Hatoraske. The 27. our Fleete ankered at Hatorask, and there we rested. The 29. Grangino brother to king Wingina came aboord the Admirall, and Manteo with him. The 2. the Admirall was sent to Weapomeiok. The 5. M. John Arundell was sent for England . The 25. our Generall wayed anker, and set saile for England . About the 31. he tooke a Spanish ship of 300 tunne richly loaden, boording her with a boate made with boards of chests, which fell asunder, and sunke at the ships side, assoone as ever he and his men were out of it. The 10. of September, by foule weather the Generall then shipped in the prize, lost sight of the Tyger. The 6. the Tyger fell with the Landes end, and the same day came to anker at Falmouth . The 18. the General came with the prize to Plymmouth, and was courteously received by divers of his worshipfull friends.
ecotan , and the same day came aboord our Fleete ryding at Wococon. The 21. our Fleete ankering at Wococon, we wayed anker for Hatoraske. The 27. our Fleete ankered at Hatorask, and there we rested. The 29. Grangino brother to king Wingina came aboord the Admirall, and Manteo with him. The 2. the Admirall was sent to Weapomeiok. The 5. M. John Arundell was sent for England . The 25. our Generall wayed anker, and set saile for England . About the 31. he tooke a Spanish ship of 300 tunne richly loaden, boording her with a boate made with boards of chests, which fell asunder, and sunke at the ships side, assoone as ever he and his men were out of it. The 10. of September, by foule weather the Generall then shipped in the prize, lost sight of the Tyger. The 6. the Tyger fell with the Landes end, and the same day came to anker at Falmouth . The 18. the General came with the prize to Plymmouth, and was courteously received by divers of his worshipfull friends.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
e a very good countrey. And we saw very fine champion ground, and woods. From this place we ranne for the banke of Newfoundland , whereas we met with divers, but none would take in a man of us, untill it pleased God that wee met with a barke of Falmouth , which received us all for a little time; and with her we tooke a French ship, wherein I left capitan de la Barbotier my deere friend, and all his company, and stayed my selfe aboord the English barke: and having passage in the same, in the moneth of August I arrived at Falmouth 1594. A voyage of the honourable Gentleman M. Robert Duddeley, now knight, to the isle of Trinidad , and the coast of Paria: with his returne home by the Isles of Granata, Santa Cruz, Sant Juan de puerto rico, Mona , Zacheo, the shoalds called Abreojos, and the isle of Bermuda . In which voyage he and his company tooke and sunke nine Spanish ships, wherof one was an armada of 600 tunnes. Written at the request of M. Richard Hakluyt.HAVING ever since I could
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A briefe note of a voyage to the East Indies, begun the 10 of April 1591, wherein were three tall ships, the Penelope of Captaine Raimond, Admirall, the Merchant royall, whereof was Captaine, Samuel Foxcroft, Viceadmirall, the Edward Bonaventure, whereof was Captaine, M. James Lancaster, Rere-admirall, with a small pinnesse. Written by Henry May, who in his returne homeward by the West Indies, suffred shipwracke upon the isle of Bermuda , wherof here is annexed a large description. (search)
e a very good countrey. And we saw very fine champion ground, and woods. From this place we ranne for the banke of Newfoundland , whereas we met with divers, but none would take in a man of us, untill it pleased God that wee met with a barke of Falmouth , which received us all for a little time; and with her we tooke a French ship, wherein I left capitan de la Barbotier my deere friend, and all his company, and stayed my selfe aboord the English barke: and having passage in the same, in the mone champion ground, and woods. From this place we ranne for the banke of Newfoundland , whereas we met with divers, but none would take in a man of us, untill it pleased God that wee met with a barke of Falmouth , which received us all for a little time; and with her we tooke a French ship, wherein I left capitan de la Barbotier my deere friend, and all his company, and stayed my selfe aboord the English barke: and having passage in the same, in the moneth of August I arrived at Falmouth 1594.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The discoverie of the large, rich, and beautifull Empire of Guiana, with a relation of the great and golden citie of Manoa (which the Spaniards call El Dorado) and the provinces of Emeria, Aromaia, Amapaia, and other countries, with their rivers adjoyning. Performed in the yeere 1595 by Sir Walter Ralegh Knight, Captaine of Her Majesties Guard, Lorde Warden of the Stanneries, and Her Highnesse Lieutenant Generall of the Countie of Corne-wall. (search)
e hands; for by a draught thereof all may be prevented by other nations: for I know it is this very yeere sought by the French, although by the way that they now take, I feare it not much. It was also tolde me yer I departed England , that Villiers the admirall was in preparation for the planting of Amazones, to which river the French have made divers voyages, and returned much golde, and other rarities. I spake with a captaine of a French ship that came from thence, his ship riding in Falmouth the same yere that my ships came first from Virginia . There was another this yeere in Helford that also came from thence, and had bene foureteene moneths at an anker in Amazones, which were both very rich. Although, as I am perswaded, Guiana cannot be entred that way, yet no doubt the trade of gold from thence passeth by branches of rivers into the river of Amazones, and so it doth on every hand far from the countrey it selfe; for those Indians of Trinidad have plates of golde from
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