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Aristophanes, Lysistrata (ed. Jack Lindsay), line 387 (search)
AGISTRATE Have the luxurious rites of the women glittered Their libertine show, their drumming tapped out crowds, The Sabazian Mysteries summoned their mob, Adonis been wept to death on the terraces, As I could hear the last day in the Assembly? For Demostratus—let bad luck befoul him— Was roaring, “We must sail for Sicily,” While a woman, throwing herself about in a dance Lopsided with drink, was shrilling out “Adonis, Woe for Adonis.” Then Demostratus shouted, “We must levy hoplites at Zacynthus,” And there the woman, up to the ears in wine, Was screaming “Weep for Adonis” on the house-top, The scoundrelly politician, that lunatic ox, Bellowing bad advice through tipsy shrieks: Such are the follies wantoning in them. MEN O if you knew their full effronery! All of the insults they've done, besides sousing us With water from their pots to our public disgrace For we stand here wringing our clothes like grown-up infants. MAGISTRATE By Poseidon, justly done! For i
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 3, line 258 (search)
more, but turned to prayers and offerings, asking grace, scarce knowing if those creatures were divine, or but vast birds, ill-omened and unclean. Father Anchises to the gods in heaven uplifted suppliant hands, and on that shore due ritual made, crying aloud; “Ye gods avert this curse, this evil turn away! Smile, Heaven, upon your faithful votaries.” Then bade he launch away, the chain undo, set every cable free and spread all sail. O'er the white waves we flew, and took our way where'er the helmsman or the winds could guide. Now forest-clad Zacynthus met our gaze, engirdled by the waves; Dulichium, same, and Neritos, a rocky steep, uprose. We passed the cliffs of Ithaca that called Laertes king, and flung our curse on fierce Ulysses' hearth and native land. nigh hoar Leucate's clouded crest we drew, where Phoebus' temple, feared by mariners, loomed o'er us; thitherward we steered and reached the little port and town. Our weary fleet dropped anchor, and lay beached along the stra
T. Maccius Plautus, Mercator, or The Merchant (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 3, scene 4 (search)
else that you can tell about him? EUTYCHUS It is just as much as I know. CHARINUS I' troth, for sure, with his lank jaws he has caused my jaw to dropHe has caused my jaw to drop: Literally, "he has given me a great evil." He puns upon the resemblance of the words "malum," an "evil," and "mala," the "jaw.". I cannot endure it; I'm determined that I'll go hence in exile. But what state in especial to repair to, I'm in doubt; Megara, Eretria, Corinth, Chalcis, Crete, Cyprus, Sicyon, Cnidos, Zacynthus, Lesbos, or Bœotia. EUTYCHUS Why are you adopting that design? CHARINUS Why, because love is tormenting me. EUTYCHUS What say you as to this? Suppose, if when you have arrived there, whither you are now intending to go, you begin there to fall desperately in love, and there, too, you fail of success, then you'll be taking flight from there as well, and after that, again, from another place, if the same shall happen, what bounds, pray, will be set to your exile, what limits to your flight?
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Notes in writing, besides more privie by mouth, that were given by M. Richard Hakluyt of Eiton in the Countie of Hereford, Esquire, Anno 1580: to M. Arthur Pet, and to M. Charles Jackman, sent by the Merchants of the Moscovie companie for the discovery of the Northeast straight, not altogether unfit for some other enterprises of discovery, hereafter to be taken in hand. (search)
Comfets of divers kinds made of purpose by him that is most excellent, that shal not dissolve. Prunes damaske. Dried Peares. Walnuts. Almonds. Olives to make them taste their wine. The apple John that dureth two yeeres to make shew of our fruits. Hullocke. Sacke. Vials of good sweet waters, and casting bottels of glasses to besprinkle the ghests withall, after their comming aboord. Suger to use with their wine if they will. The sweet oyle of Zante , and excellent French vineger, and a fine kind of Bisket stieped in the same do make a banketting dish, and a little Sugar cast in it cooleth and comforteth, and refresheth the spirits of man. Cynamon water, Imperiall water is to be had with you to make a shew of by taste, and also to comfort your sicke in the voyage. With these and such like, you may banket where you arrive the greater and best persons. Or with the gift of these Marmelades in small boxes, or small vials of sweet wat
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, For banketting on shipboord persons of credite. (search)
Comfets of divers kinds made of purpose by him that is most excellent, that shal not dissolve. Prunes damaske. Dried Peares. Walnuts. Almonds. Olives to make them taste their wine. The apple John that dureth two yeeres to make shew of our fruits. Hullocke. Sacke. Vials of good sweet waters, and casting bottels of glasses to besprinkle the ghests withall, after their comming aboord. Suger to use with their wine if they will. The sweet oyle of Zante , and excellent French vineger, and a fine kind of Bisket stieped in the same do make a banketting dish, and a little Sugar cast in it cooleth and comforteth, and refresheth the spirits of man. Cynamon water, Imperiall water is to be had with you to make a shew of by taste, and also to comfort your sicke in the voyage. With these and such like, you may banket where you arrive the greater and best persons. Or with the gift of these Marmelades in small boxes, or small vials of sweet wat
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of M. Roger Bodenham with the great Barke Aucher to Candia and Chio, in the yeere 1550. (search)
and, they are good archers, every one with his bowe and arrowes, a sword and a dagger, with long haire, and bootes that reach up to their grine, and a shirt of male, hanging the one halfe before, and the other halfe behinde, these were sent away againe assoone as the armie was past. They would drinke wine out of all measure. Then the armie being past, I laded my shippe with wines and other things: and so after I had that which I left in Chio, I departed for Messina . In the way I found about Zante , certaine Galliots of Turkes, laying abord of certaine vessels of Venice laden with Muscatels : I rescued them, and had but a barrell of wine for my powder and shot: and within a few dayes after I came to Messina . I had in my shippe a Spanish pilot called Noblezia, which I tooke in at Cades at my comming foorth: he went with me all this voyage into the Levant without wages, of good will that he bare me and the shippe, he stoode me in good steede untill I came backe againe to Cades, and
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of M. John Locke to Jerusalem. (search)
winde scanted, and wee minded to have gone to Zante , but we could not for that night. This Iland of Zante is distant from Cephalonia , 12 or 14 miles, but the towne of Cephalonia , from the towne of Zante , is distant fortie miles. This night we went but little forward. The 30 day we remainede entered the channell betweene Cephalonia , & Zante , the which chanell is about eight or tenne milWest and by North from the other. The towne of Zante lieth within a point of the land, where we came to the Emperour) went from Rome, and came to Zante , and there buried his head and arme, and wrotete, which is the Turkes, and is ten miles from Zante , it did belong to the Venetians, but they have we bare into the sea, because we had newes at Zante of twelve of the Turkes gallies, that came froand shoot neere the marke. This Ilande is from Zante 300 miles. The seventh we sayled all along thrke. This night we ankred afore the towne of Zante , where we that night went on land, and rested
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The first voyage or journey, made by Master Laurence Aldersey, Marchant of London, to the Cities of Jerusa lem, and Tripolis, &c. In the yeere 1581. Penned and set downe by himselfe. (search)
ose litle of our way: and while both he, and all of us were in our dumps, God sent us a merry gale of winde, that we ranne threescore and tenne leagues before it was twelve a clocke the next day, and in sixe dayes after we were seven leagues past Zante . And upon Munday morning, being the three and twentie of the same moneth, we came in the sight of Candia which day the winde came contrary, with great blasts, and stormes, untill the eight and twentie of the same moneth: in which time, the Marin 11 day of October we were boorded with foure gallies, manned with 1200 men, which also made a sleevelesse arrant, and troubled us very much, but our captaines pasport, and the gift of 100 chekins discharged all. The 27 of October we passed by Zante with a merrie winde, the 29 by Corfu , and the third of November we arrived at Istria , and there we left our great ship, and tooke small boates to bring us to Venice . The 9 of November I arrived again at Venice in good health, where I staie
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Remembrances for master S. to give him the better occasion to informe himselfe of some things in England, and after of some other things in Turkie, to the great profite of the Common weale of this Countrey. Written by the foresayd master Richard Hakluyt, for a principall English Factor at Constantinople 1582. (search)
brought into England from Vienna in Austria divers kinds of flowers called Tulipas, and those and other procured thither a little before from Constantinople by an excellent man called M. Carolus Clusius. And it is sayd that since we traded to Zante that the plant that beareth the Coren is also brought into this realme from thence: and although it bring not fruit to perfection, yet it may serve for pleasure and for some use, like as our vines doe, which we cannot well spare, although the cliTabacco hath bene brought hither out of the West Indies, it groweth heere, and with the herbe many have bene eased of the reumes, &c. Each one of a great number of things were woorthy of a journey to be made into Spaine, Italy , Barbarie, Egypt , Zante , Constantinople, the West Indies, and to divers other places neerer and further off then any of these, yet forasmuch as the poore are not able, and for that the rich setled at home in quiet will not, therefore we are to make sute to such as repai
brought into England from Vienna in Austria divers kinds of flowers called Tulipas, and those and other procured thither a little before from Constantinople by an excellent man called M. Carolus Clusius. And it is sayd that since we traded to Zante that the plant that beareth the Coren is also brought into this realme from thence: and although it bring not fruit to perfection, yet it may serve for pleasure and for some use, like as our vines doe, which we cannot well spare, although the cliTabacco hath bene brought hither out of the West Indies, it groweth heere, and with the herbe many have bene eased of the reumes, &c. Each one of a great number of things were woorthy of a journey to be made into Spaine, Italy , Barbarie, Egypt , Zante , Constantinople, the West Indies, and to divers other places neerer and further off then any of these, yet forasmuch as the poore are not able, and for that the rich setled at home in quiet will not, therefore we are to make sute to such as repai
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