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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Libellus de politica conservatia Maris. Or, The Pollicy of keeping the Sea. (search)
passed other great ships of all the commons; The Trinitie, the Grace de Dieu, the holy Ghost, And other moe, which as nowe bee lost. What hope ye was the kings great intent Of thoo shippes, and what in minde hee meant? It was not ellis, but that hee cast to bee Lorde round about environ of the see. And when Harflew had her siege about, There came caracks horrible great and stoute In the narrow see willing to abide, To stoppe us there with multitude of pride. My Lord of Bedford came on and had the cure, Destroyed they were by that discomfiture. This was after the king Harflew had wonne, Whan our enemies to siege had begonne; That all was slaine or take, by true relation, To his worshippe, and of his English nation. There was present the kings chamberlaine At both battailes; which knoweth this in certaine; He can it tell otherwise then I: Aske him, and witte; I passe foorth hastily. What had this king of his magnificence, Of great courage, o
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, After the Chapitles of commodities of divers lands, sheweth the conclusion of keeping of the sea environ, by a storie of King Edgar and two incidents of King Edward the third, and King Henrie the fifth. Chap. 11. (search)
passed other great ships of all the commons; The Trinitie, the Grace de Dieu, the holy Ghost, And other moe, which as nowe bee lost. What hope ye was the kings great intent Of thoo shippes, and what in minde hee meant? It was not ellis, but that hee cast to bee Lorde round about environ of the see. And when Harflew had her siege about, There came caracks horrible great and stoute In the narrow see willing to abide, To stoppe us there with multitude of pride. My Lord of Bedford came on and had the cure, Destroyed they were by that discomfiture. This was after the king Harflew had wonne, Whan our enemies to siege had begonne; That all was slaine or take, by true relation, To his worshippe, and of his English nation. There was present the kings chamberlaine At both battailes; which knoweth this in certaine; He can it tell otherwise then I: Aske him, and witte; I passe foorth hastily. What had this king of his magnificence, Of great courage, o
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Another incident of keeping of the see, in the time of the marveilous werriour and victorious Prince, King Henrie the fifth, and of his great shippes. (search)
passed other great ships of all the commons; The Trinitie, the Grace de Dieu, the holy Ghost, And other moe, which as nowe bee lost. What hope ye was the kings great intent Of thoo shippes, and what in minde hee meant? It was not ellis, but that hee cast to bee Lorde round about environ of the see. And when Harflew had her siege about, There came caracks horrible great and stoute In the narrow see willing to abide, To stoppe us there with multitude of pride. My Lord of Bedford came on and had the cure, Destroyed they were by that discomfiture. This was after the king Harflew had wonne, Whan our enemies to siege had begonne; That all was slaine or take, by true relation, To his worshippe, and of his English nation. There was present the kings chamberlaine At both battailes; which knoweth this in certaine; He can it tell otherwise then I: Aske him, and witte; I passe foorth hastily. What had this king of his magnificence, Of great courage, o
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.25 (search)
will serve the higher intelligences in the country, with that same zeal, brightness, and inventiveness, which Stead devotes to the masses. Now I have faithfully said my say, and send you hearty greetings. November 17th, 1893. I have been to Bedford, and am back. My inviter and entertainer was Mr. A. Talbot, a Master of the Grammar School at Bedford. This school was founded in 1552, by Sir William Harper, a Lord Mayor of London, who endowed it with land which, at the time, brought only onBedford. This school was founded in 1552, by Sir William Harper, a Lord Mayor of London, who endowed it with land which, at the time, brought only one hundred and sixty pounds a year, but which has since grown to be sixteen thousand pounds a year. A new Grammar School was completed three years ago, at a cost of thirty thousand pounds, and is a magnificent structure of red brick with stone facings. Its Hall is superb, between forty and fifty feet high, and about one hundred feet, by forty feet. It was in this Hall I lectured to a very crowded audience. The new lecture on ‘Emin‘ was received in perfect silence until I finished, when the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Heckewelder, John Gottlieb Ernestus 1743-1823 (search)
Heckewelder, John Gottlieb Ernestus 1743-1823 Missionary; born in Bedford, England, March 12, 1743. Becoming a preacher in his youth, he came to America (1754), and labored forty years among the Indians of Pennsylvania, studying carefully their language, and producing a vocabulary. In 1762 he accompanied Christian Post on a mission to the Indians in Ohio; and in 1797 he was sent to superintend a mission on the Muskingum River. He settled at Bethlehem, Pa., after an adventurous career, and published (1819) a History of the manners and customs of the Indian Nations who formerly inhabited Pennsylvania and the neighboring States. He died in Bethlehem, Pa., Jan. 21, 1823. His daughter, Johanna Maria, was born at the present village of Port Washington, April 20, 1781, and was the first white child born within the present limits of Ohio. She lived a maiden at Bethlehem, Pa., until about 1870. In a diary kept by the younger pupils of the Bethlehem boarding-school, where Miss Hecke
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Jay, John 1817-1894 (search)
have the confirmation of the Senate, Washington nominated Mr. Jay (April 16), which nomination was confirmed April 19. The special minister arrived in England in June, where he was received with great courtesy by the British government. He negotiated a treaty which was not wholly satisfactory to his countrymen, closing his labors on Nov. 19; and from 1795 to 1801 he was governor of New York, under whose administration slavery was abolished. This was his last public office. He died in Bedford, N. Y., May 17, 1829. See Ames, Fisher. Jay's treaty. After Mr. Jay's formal reception in London, Lord Grenville, then at the head of foreign affairs, expressed great anxiety to bring the negotiations to a successful issue. There was a wide difference of views concerning matters in dispute. The Americans complained that, contrary to the provisions of the treaty of peace (1783), a large number of negroes had been carried off by the evacuating armies; and for this loss compensation was
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Standards, (search)
Standards, A flag or ensign round which men rally or unite for a common purpose; also an emblem of nationality. The practice of an army using standards dates from the earliest times. The emblem of the cross on standards and shields is due to the asserted miraculous appearance of a cross to Constantine, previous to his battle with Maxentius; Eusebius says that he received this statement from the Emperor himself, 312. The standard was named labarum. For the celebrated French standard, Auriflamme. The British imperial standard was first hoisted on the Tower of London, and on Bedford tower, Dublin, and displayed by the foot guards, on the union of the kingdoms, Jan. 1, 1801.
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: a summer abroad 1892-1893; aet. 73-74 (search)
l Ark of God was the Church Universal, which has been defined as the whole company of believing Christian people throughout the world. Many changes would occur, but the vital principle of religion would prove itself steadfast — a truly noble sermon, worthy of Phillips Brooks. July 12. To the New Gallery in which were two fine portraits by Herkomer, a superb one of Paderewski by Tadema, and one of Walter Crane by Watts, also of distinguished excellence. Later, called upon the Duchess of Bedford, a handsome woman, sister to Lady Henry Somerset. We talked of her sister's visit to the United States. I was well able to praise her eloquence and her general charm. She has known Lowell well. We talked of the old London, the old Boston, both past their palmiest literary days. She had heard Phillips Brooks at Westminster Abbey; admired him much, but thought him optimistic. July 14. Was engaged to spend the afternoon at Mrs. Moulton's reception and to dine with Sebastian Schlesinger
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Old portraits and modern Sketches (search)
steeple should fall upon my head. About this time, while wandering through Bedford in pursuit of employment, he chanced to see three or four poor old women sittiad that faith which the Scriptures spake of. Travelling one day from Elstow to Bedford, after a recent rain, which had left pools of water in the path, he felt a strowed the wonderful dream of his Pilgrim's Progress. He saw some holy people of Bedford on the sunny side of an high mountain, refreshing themselves in the pleasant aanishment. This sentence, however, was never executed, but he was remanded to Bedford jail, where he lay a prisoner for twelve years. Here, shut out from the worrt-sighted persecutors of Bunyan dream, when they closed upon him the door of Bedford jail, that God would overrule their poor spite and envy to His own glory and troud bishops he counted less than the humblest and poorest of his disciples at Bedford. When first arrested and thrown into prison, he supposed he should be called
rrassments of American affairs by taking the seals for the Northern Department. Those of the Southern, which included the colonies, were intrusted to the Duke of Bedford. The new secretary was a man of inflexible honesty and good — will to his country, untainted by duplicity or timidity. His abilities were not brilliant; but hconcealment, and was blunt, unabashed, and, without being aware of it, rudely impetuous, even in the presence of his sovereign. Newcastle was jealous of rivals;— Bedford was impatient of contradiction. Newcastle was timorous without caution, and rushed into difficulculties which he evaded by indecision;—the fearless, chap. I.} 1748. positive, uncompromising Bedford, energetic without sagacity, and stubborn with but a narrow range of thought, scorned to shun deciding upon any question that might arise, grew choleric at resistance, could not or would not foresee obstacles, and was known throughout America as ever ready at all hazards to vindicate authority<
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