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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 10: Prudence Crandall.—1833. (search)
nnecticut: Prudence Crandall to W. L. Garrison. Canterbury, Jan. 18th, 1833. Ms. Mr. Garrison: I am to you, srd letter: Prudence Crandall to W. L. Garrison. Canterbury, February 12th, 1833. Ms. Mr. Garrison: I can infod practically dismiss her white pupils instead, and make Canterbury the seat of the higher education of niggers. The good people of Canterbury, writes Arnold Ms. to W. L. G. Buffum from Providence, on March 4, I learn, have had three town meeti all hazards. If we suffer the school to be put down in Canterbury, other places will partake of the panic, and also prevenult of the meeting to be held in C. to-morrow will be Canterbury. waited for by us with great anxiety. Our brother May dred from the Legislature, amid the greatest rejoicing in Canterbury (even to the ringing of church bells); This act was rle the prejudices of the Ms. Mar. 19, 1833. people of Canterbury with all the mildness possible, as everything severe ten
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 12: American Anti-slavery Society.—1833. (search)
r own heart, and their bows shall be broken. Undeterred by the riotous demonstrations which had attended his return, and in forgetfulness or defiance of his Canterbury enemies who had sought to prevent his departure for England, Mr. Garrison, in the fourth week in October, paid a visit to Miss Crandall, and saw her Lib. 3.171, 175. school in the full tide of successful experiment. He saw also the stone which was thrown into the window by some unknown republican of Canterbury—the shattered pane of glass—the window-curtain stained by a volley of rotten eggs—and last, not least, a moral nondescript, though physically a human being, named A—— Andrew, Doctor Harris, presented me with five indictments for a panegyric upon their virtuous and magnanimous actions, in relation to Miss Crandall's nigger school in Canterbury, inserted in the Liberator of March 16, 1833. I shall readily comply with their polite and urgent invitation to appear at the Windham County Court on the se