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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

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e of the fact.--(Doc. 8.)--Charleston Mercury, Dec. 28; Mess. Barnwell, Orr, and Adams, the Commissioners appointed by South Carolina to treat with the Federal Government, arrived in Washington to-day. This evening they have held a consultation with a few friends, among whom was Senator Wigfall, of Texas.--Boston Post. Dec. 27. In the Convention at Charleston, Mr. Rhett offered the following ordinance: First.--That the Conventions of the seceding slaveholding States of the United States unite with South Carolina., land hold a Convention at Montgomery, Ala., for the purpose of forming a Southern Confederacy. Second.--That the said seceding States appoint, by their respective Conventions or Legislatures, as many delegates as they have representatives in the present Congress of the United States, to the said Convention to be held at Montgomery ; and that on the adoption of the Constitution of the Southern Confederacy, the vote shall be by States. Third.--That wheneve
at Norfolk, Va., in consequence of the report that four companies of soldiers at Fortress Monroe had been ordered to Charleston.--Baltimore Sun. It is stated in Washington, on the authority of a member of the Georgia delegation, that the United States revenue cutter Dolphin was fired upon and seized to-day, by the secessionists at Savannah. Upon the same statement in Georgia, the Governor issued an order for her release.--Times, Jan. 5. The South Carolina Convention appointed Hons. eople of Florida, by the Charleston Mercury, to seize the forts and other defences at Pensacola and Key West, threatens the capture of the California treasure ships by letters of marque and privateers.--(Doc. 13.) Fast-day throughout the United States, by proclamation of the President. It is generally observed.--(Doc. 14.) Fort Morgan, at the entrance of Mobile Bay, was taken this morning by Alabama troops, and is now garrisoned by two hundred men.--The Press, Jan. 5. This eveni
Jan. 6. A meeting of citizens, irrespective of party, was held at Chicago, Ill., this evening. The resolutions adopted express love for the Union; regard every attempt to rend it as the basest treason and most insane folly; regard the Constitution of the United States as forming a union between the people of the several States, and intended to be perpetual; and every attempt by a State to secede or annul the laws of the United States, is not only usurping the powers of the general Government, but aggression upon the equal rights of the other States; that peaceable secession, if possible, must necessarily be a matter of agreement between the States, and until such agreement is made, the existing Government has no choice but to enforce the law and protect the property of the nation; that in view of what is now transpiring in the Southern States, of threats to prevent the inauguration of a President, constitutionally elected, it is incumbent upon the loyal people of the several S
Jan. 7. A variety of plans for capturing Fort Sumter have been devised, but as yet none have been put in practice. One man thought it might be taken by floating down to the fort rafts piled with burning tar-barrels, thus attempting to smoke the American troops out as you would smoke a rabbit out of a hollow. Another was for filling bombs with prussic acid and giving each of the United States soldiers a smell. Still another supposed that the fort might be taken without bloodshed by offering to each soldier ten dollars and a speaking to. And still another thought that by erecting a barricade of cotton bales, and arming it with cannon, a floating battery might be made, which, with the aid of Forts Moultrie and Johnson, and Castle Pinckney, together with redoubts thrown up on Morris' and Jones' Islands, and with further assistance of an armed fleet, an attack might be made on the fort, and at some convenient point a party of sharpshooters might be stationed, who would pick off
fforts were made to postpone action, which were voted down. The fifteen delegates who opposed the ordinance will sign it to-morrow, making the vote unanimous. Fireworks were displayed at the capitol in Jackson this evening. The excitement is intense.--New Orleans Picayune, Jan. 10. At half-past 7 A. M. the steamship Star of the West was signalled at the entrance of Charleston harbor. As she made her way toward Fort Sumter, a shot was sent across her bow from a battery on Morris' Island, when she displayed the United States flag, and was repeatedly fired into from the Morris' Island battery and from Fort Moultrie. Her course was then altered, and she again put to sea. Guns were run out at Fort Sumter, but none were fired. At 11 o'clock Major Anderson sent a flag with a communication to Governor Pickens, to inquire if this act had the sanction of the State Government; was informed that it had, and thereupon sent a special messenger to Washington with dispatches.--(Doc. 18.)
Jan. 18. In the Massachusetts State Legislature to-day, a series of resolutions was passed by a unanimous vote, tendering to the President of the United States such aid in men and money as he may request, to maintain the authority of the general Government. The preamble to the resolution declares that the State of South Carolina, in seizing the fortifications of the Federal Government, the Post Office, Custom House, moneys, arms, munitions of war, and by firing upon a vessel in the servh aid in men and money as he may request, to maintain the authority of the general Government. The preamble to the resolution declares that the State of South Carolina, in seizing the fortifications of the Federal Government, the Post Office, Custom House, moneys, arms, munitions of war, and by firing upon a vessel in the service of the United States, has committed an act of war. The Senate passed a bill authorizing the increase of the volunteer military of the State.--Boston Journal, Jan. 19.
ition to announce in the most positive terms that it is the intention of the English Government to acknowledge the independence of the Southern Confederacy as soon as it is formed. The London Times, in an article on the disunion movement in America, asserts that the United States cannot for many years be to the world what they have been. --(Doc. 25.) An effort was made by the New York police to seize a quantity of fire-arms which were known to be shipped on board the steamer MontgomerUnited States cannot for many years be to the world what they have been. --(Doc. 25.) An effort was made by the New York police to seize a quantity of fire-arms which were known to be shipped on board the steamer Montgomery. While the officers were searching on board for the arms, the captain ordered the vessel's fasts to be cut, and she steamed away from the pier, scarcely giving the policemen time to jump ashore. The five hundred muskets found on board the schooner Caspian were returned to the captain, the authorities being satisfied that the vessel was bound to Carthagena.--Chicago Tribune. The United States arsenal at Augusta, Ga., was surrendered to the State authorities, upon the demand of Governor
Jan. 29. The United States revenue cutter Robert McClelland, Captain Breshwood (a Virginian), was surrendered at New Orleans to the State of Louisiana.--Times, Feb. 8. Secretary Dix's dispatch to Hemphill Jones, to shoot on the spot any one who attempts to haul down the American flag caused great enthusiasm.--(Doc. 28.)
Jan. 31. The State of South Carolina, by her attorney-general, I. W. Hayne, offered to buy Fort Sumter, and declared that, if not permitted to purchase, she would seize the fort by force of arms. The United States, in reply, asserted political rights superior to the proprietary right, and not subject to the right of eminent domain. --Times, Feb. 9. The United States branch mint, and the custom-house at New Orleans, seized by the State authorities. In the mint were government funds to the amount of $389,000, and in the sub-treasury, $122,000--(Doc. 29.)--Louisville Journal, Feb. 2.
Feb. 2. The United States revenue cutter Lewis Cass, Capt. Morrison, a Georgian, was surrendered by the officer at Mobile to the State of Louisiana.--(Doc. 31.)--N. Y. Times, Feb. 6.
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