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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 1: operations in Virginia.--battle of Chancellorsville.--siege of Suffolk. (search)
than half a dozen men. Meanwhile portions of Couch's corps (Second) had been waiting in concealment near Banks's and United States Fords, leaving the remainder, under General Gibbon, at Falmouth, in full view of the Confederates, so as to conceal tce. Pursuant to orders, Sickles now moved his corps stealthily away, and, marching swiftly, crossed the river at the United States Ford, and hastened to Chancellorsville. When Lee discovered Hooker's real intentions, he did not fly toward Richmo extremely anxious to press forward, and, by extending his lines to the left, cut off Hooker's communication with the United States Ford. While awaiting the arrival of General Hill to the front, he pushed forward with his staff and an escort on a p Villa, or Chancellorsville), as it appeared when the writer sketched it, in June, 1866. roads leading to Elly's and United States Fords, the right resting on the Rapid Anna, the left on the Rappahannock, and the apex at Bullock's house. On this l
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 2: Lee's invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania. (search)
, 48. revolution in the North expected Confederate States' seal, 49. events on the Rappahannock cknowledgment of the independence of the Confederate States were again strong and active. In Englanent to recognize the independence of the Confederate States. On this occasion the following resolutgment by them of the independence of the Confederate States of North America. and these culminateditish Government, making deadly war on the United States. Every right-minded Englishman condemned , 1862, the Emperor, after saying that the United States fed the factories of Europe with cotton, a Louis Napoleon supposed the power of the United States to be broken by the rebellion and civil waovement was offensive to the people of the United States, for they saw in it not only an outrage upFor a year the subject of a seal for the Confederate States had been before the Congress at Richmondaving around its margin the words, Confederate States of America, 22D Feb., 1862, with the followin[6 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 3: political affairs.--Riots in New York.--Morgan's raid North of the Ohio. (search)
hief of the land and naval forces of the Confederate States, to Abraham Lincoln, Commander-in-Chief of the land and naval forces of the United States. Stephens proceeded to Fortress Monroe in the flerms of the absolute independence of the Confederate States. A Rebel War Clerk, in his diary, underciety among his refugee friends from the Confederate States, with whom he was in sympathy. Meanwhily exequatur issued by a former Government [United States] which was, at the time of the issue, the sincerity and fidelity as citizens of the United States. So the discussion, so far as the Presidevor of peace and the independence of the Confederate States, assumed the lesser proportions of a rioitary service all white residents of the Confederate States between the ages of eighteen and forty-fs issued an address to the people of the Confederate States, July 15, 1863. calling out all who wery are so far from the subjugation of the Confederate States, that the defense of Maryland and Pennsy
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 5: the Chattanooga campaign.--movements of Sherman's and Burnside's forces. (search)
space of eight days, the two corps, twenty thousand strong, marched from the Rapid Anna to Washington, and were thence conveyed through West Virginia, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee, to the Tennessee River. Halleck determined to hold Chattanooga and East Tennessee at all hazards. For that purpose he ordered the concentration of three armies there, under one commander, and on the 16th of October, 1863. an order went out from the War Department, saying: By order of the President of the United States, the Departments of the Ohio [Burnside's], of the Cumberland [Rosecrans's], and of the Tennessee [Grant's], will constitute the Military Division of the Mississippi. Major-General U. S. Grant, United States Army, is placed in command of the Military Division of the Mississippi, with his Headquarters in the field. By the same order General Rosecrans was relieved of the command of the Army of the Cumberland, and General Thomas was assigned to it. General Sherman was promoted to the comman
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 6: siege of Knoxville.--operations on the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia. (search)
ued an order at Richmond, directing that Generals Hunter and Phelps (see page 225, volume II.) should no longer be held and treated as public enemies of the Confederate States, but as outlaws. Such fulminations of the chief Conspirator, who was always ready to raise the black flag when he thought it safe to do so, were quite commficer commanding naval forces of South Carolina, proclaimed, without the shadow of truth, the blockade of Charleston to be raised by a superior force of the Confederate States. Not a single vessel of the blockading squadron had been lost, for the Confederates did not make the Mercidita a prize by putting men on board of her, and that the ultimate success of the Confederates would be complete. All the trophies of victory secured by the Confederates were two 11-inch Dahlgren guns, two United States flags, two pennants, and three signal flags. The guns were immediately put into the Confederate service--substantial trophies of the affair, Beauregard said.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 7: the siege of Charleston to the close of 1863.--operations in Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. (search)
and their friends had indulged when contemplating the Atlanta, faded away. Instead of raiding up the Atlantic coast, spreading terror among the inhabitants of seaport towns, she was taken quietly to Philadelphia, and there exhibited for awhile for the benefit of the fund of the Union Volunteer Refreshment Saloon. See page 578, volume I. It is said that the cost of the Atlanta was defrayed entirely by the proceeds of the voluntary sale of their jewelry by the misguided women of the Confederate States. The example was followed at Charleston, where the building of a gun-boat was begun, with the expectation of money from similar sources, to carry it on. Although the attack on Sumter in April was a failure, the Government was determined to renew the attempt in connection with a land force. Dupont's views were so decidedly in opposition to the measure, because he could anticipate no other result than failure again, that soon after the capture of the Atlanta, when Gillmore was prepa
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 8: Civil affairs in 1863.--military operations between the Mountains and the Mississippi River. (search)
of the court, was Henry S. Foote, formerly United States Senator, and then misrepresenting Tennessee President, that for every soldier of the United States killed in violation of the laws of war, a ou Lieutenant-General of the Armies of the United States. With this high honor devolves upon you, ointed to the command of the armies of the United States. Abraham Lincoln. I assume command of the Armies of the United States. Headquarters will be in the field, and, until further orders, wi being made on the part of the so-called Confederate States, or the authorities or agents thereof, tll to ignore the actual existence of the Confederate States, and to contemptuously style them so-callow the subjugation of a nation like the Confederate States, by such a barbarous, despotic race as aarge the responsibility of this war on the United States. . . . The war in which we are engaged wasequip, and receive into the service of the United States, such number of volunteers of African desc[5 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 10: the last invasion of Missouri.--events in East Tennessee.--preparations for the advance of the Army of the Potomac. (search)
ing 12,177 in favor of it, and only 226 against it. Representatives in Congress and State officers were chosen under it, and the Legislature elected April 25. United States Senators. By every usual form the State was restored to its proper situation in the Union, in partial accordance with the terms of the President's Proclamatioof Mr. Malony, who told us that he was a fellow-craftsman, and rival in the tailoring business in that village, of Andrew Johnson, then acting President of the United States. This was for many years the home of Andrew Johnson, and the place of his useful business as the maker of garments, in which, it is said, he excelled, and wsix o'clock in the morning were at Mount Airy, twenty-eight hundred feet above the Richmond basin, and said to be the most lofty point of railway travel in the United States. We descended into the rugged valleys eastward of this Appalachian range, and then ascended the western gentle slope of the Blue Ridge, one of the most beauti
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 11: advance of the Army of the Potomac on Richmond. (search)
ense army-train, were now across the Rapid Anna, and well on the flank of the Confederate army lying behind the strong intrenchments on Mine Run. In this advance the Nationals had met no opposition, and it was an achievement, Grant said, which removed from his mind the most serious apprehensions which he had entertained concerning the crossing of the river in the face of an active, large, well-appointed, and ably commanded army. Report of Lieutenant-General Grant of the Armies of the United States, 1864-5, page 6. General Grant took occasion at the outset of the report to refer to the anomalous position of General Meade, who was the commander of the Army of the Potomac. He says he tried to leave General Meade in independent command of the army. His instructions were all given through Meade. They were general in their nature, leaving all the details to him. The campaigns that followed, Grant said, proved him to be the right man in the right place. His commanding in the presence
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 12: operations against Richmond. (search)
saying the necessities of the Army of the Potomac have bottled me up at Bermuda Hundred. See Report of Lieutenant-General U. S. Grant, of the Armies of the United States--1864-65, July 22, 1865. While Butler's main army was making movements toward Richmond, Kautz was out upon another raid on the railways leading to that cit of the Army of the Potomac was virtually closed, and, in view of the gloomy aspect of affairs, it recommended the setting apart of an early day throughout the United States as one for fasting, humiliation, and prayer. It also called for 400,000 more troops, and threatened an immediate and peremptory draft for that number if they an I was willing to make, all could not be accomplished that I had designed north of Richmond. --Report of Lieutenant-General U. S. Grant, of the Armies of the United States--1864-65, July 22, 1865. He had seriously crippled his adversary, who lacked means for recuperation, and he now determined to starve him into submission. Havi
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