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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16,340 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 3,098 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2,132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,974 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,668 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 1,628 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,386 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1,340 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 1,170 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 1,092 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 20, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for United States (United States) or search for United States (United States) in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: September 20, 1861., [Electronic resource], An English officer killed by an elephant. (search)
w, it says, two--including Western Virginia, we may rather say three--battle-fields, upon which great actions may at any time be expected to take place, with more or less of casualty to our brave troops engaged therein. It behooves all the Confederate States to take timely order to meet this need. From Louisiana has been sent a large proportion of the armies in the field, in Eastern Virginia and in Missouri, white in Western Virginia and in Kentucky, our State is represented by the presenc increased. For we have good reason to believe that the approaching conflict, on the eastern bank of the Potomac, will be a severe one, and cannot but be attended with many casualties it is our bounden duty to provide for. A noble example has been set by Dr. Fenner and his associates from our own State, in the establishment of a hospital for the relief of such Louisianians as may stand in need of medical care. Let it be emulated by the good people of every one of the Confederate States.
The Daily Dispatch: September 20, 1861., [Electronic resource], An English officer killed by an elephant. (search)
United States movements in the Southwest. --The San Antonio (Texas) Ledger, learns from the Noticiose of Matamoras, of the arrival of an American schooner, which brought as passengers two officers of the U. S. Army, who forthwith proceeded to de by the enemy is a significant movement in connection with the apparent well established statement that Corwin, the United States Minister, has effected a treaty with Mexico, by which the privilege is conceded the United States of passing troops oUnited States of passing troops over Mexican territory for the purpose of invading Texas. If this be so, no intelligence will be more cheering to the Texans, thousands of whom would rejoice, in the language of Corwin in reference to the United States invasion of Mexico, to welcomeore cheering to the Texans, thousands of whom would rejoice, in the language of Corwin in reference to the United States invasion of Mexico, to welcome the hirelings and their perfidious yellow skin allies "with bloody hands to hospitable graves."
the ruthless invaders of Kentucky. The same paper has the following: Our officials were remarkably fortunate yesterday in the recovery of State arms, which had been secreted, with a view to their misapplication by members of the State Guard. Early in the day the three cannon, one a twelve-pounder and the others six-pounder, were taken from their hiding place and delivered over to our loyal friend Capt. Watkins, of the Semple Guards, which company has been, mustered into the United States service. Subsequently seizures of muskets and munitions of war were made by the authorities at the store of John Snyder and the building formerly occupied by L. L. Warren & Co., on Main street, between Third and Fourth. Arms were also found at the establishment of Sachs & Bro., on Main street, below Fourth, at Crutcher & McCready's, on Main street, near the Louisville Hotel, in an out-building on the alley between Brook and Preston and Market and Jefferson streets, and perhaps in other
Seizure of a Southern schooner, --A dispatch has been received at the Navy Department in Washington, from Commander Rovan, of the steamer Pawnee, Hatteras Inlet, giving the particulars of the capture of the prize schooner, Susan Jane, with a valuable cargo. She entered Hatteras Inlet supposing it to be still in possession of the Confederate States. She has been sent to Philadelphia in charge of Lieut. Crosby. This is the third vessel captured since the taking of the forts here.
The New York Daily News says its subscription list has increased over nine times since the bombardment of Fort Sumter, thus demonstrating the growing sympathy for its fearless course in opposing the war. A regiment has been formed in Georgia, to go into immediate service, named, in honor of Vice President Stephens. "The Stephens Independent Regiment of Volunteers." In New Orleans on Friday last, a little child of a Mrs. Adams was burned to death in a house occupied by its mother, which was entirely destroyed. A special term of the Confederate States District Court commenced at Goldsboro', N. C., on yesterday.
Swindling the United States. --The rush for the Government loan is so ready and extensive in New York, that numerous mistakes have been perpetrated by purchasers, of quite a serious character. The Commissioners have discovered in their receipts large numbers of counterfeit coins, for which there is no other manner of accounting for than in the "hurry of the moment," ardent supporters of the Government have not been very careful in shelling out.
d, and thus New York and San Francisco-- the two great commercial cities of the New World--will be in communication with the rapidity of the lighthing's wing, and the Golden State and the Empire State will ever be united in the ties of a fraternal Union. It had been stated by the Secessionists that California would secede, and if she did not join the Southern States would, in conjunction with Oregon and the Territory of Washington, form a Pacific Republic, distinct and separate from the United States. But events have dissipated these hopes and predictions, proving that California is a strong Union State; and as soon as the telegraph is completed, a brigade, consisting of three or four regiments, will start thence for the East, following the line of the wires, in order to take part in the conflict for the preservation of the Union which is now going forward on the Mississippi, the Potomac, and the Atlantic coast. If the subjugation of the rebels should not be completed before the be
gentleman recently from New York informs us that the recruiting in that city proceeds slowly and that a draft will probably have to be resorted to. The lawfulness of this draft, under the theory that the South is a rebellious district of the United States, is disputed by some lawyers, but law being obsolete in the United States, and Lincolnism being supreme, the draft will go on. Our informant thinks that while parties interested in army contracts are eager to fire the popular heart, yet Manasstrict of the United States, is disputed by some lawyers, but law being obsolete in the United States, and Lincolnism being supreme, the draft will go on. Our informant thinks that while parties interested in army contracts are eager to fire the popular heart, yet Manassas gave it such a soaking, it does not burn rapidly. "On to Richmond," however, is still believed practicable, but not by the Manassas route. Our informant anticipates scenes of great misery and riot in New York this winter.
Treasury notes. --The Treasury Department having satisfactory evidence that Treasury Notes of the denomination of Ten Dollars, engraved and printed by "J. Manonorier, New Orleans," (as appears in the margin of each note,) payable two years after date, were stolen from the packages in transitu from New Orleans to Richmond, the public are notified that no notes of that denomination and description, engraved by "J. Manonorier, New Orleans," have been issued by the Department, and that none will be issued. The parties who put the same in circulation have been discovered and arrested; but, to secure the public, the whole issue will be suppressed — and any such notes found in circulation are spurious. E. C. Elmore, se 20--6t Treas'r Confederate States.
H. M. Ashby, with an escort, arrived in Nashville a few days ago, from knoxville, having in charge four prisoners who have been sent on for trial before the Confederate States District Court, at the October term, on a charge of treason. The names of the prisoners are John Gray, John W. Smith, Joel W. Jarvis and J. W. Thornburg. srepresentations. They had a preliminary hearing before the Hon. West H. Humphreys, at Knoxville, and their guilt was so clear that he sent them before the Confederate States District Court for further trial, but the Sheriff of Knox county having refused to take an oath to support the Constitution of the Confederate States, Judgere the Confederate States District Court for further trial, but the Sheriff of Knox county having refused to take an oath to support the Constitution of the Confederate States, Judge Humphreys felt unwilling to commit them to his custody, as jailor of Knox county, and ordered that they be confined in the jail of Davidson county.
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